Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Ai-Chi Aquatic Exercise

Hydrotherapy for the treatment of pain in people with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Hydrotherapy for the treatment of pain in people with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012 ;2012:473963. Epub 2011 Jul 14. PMID: 21785645 Abstract Author(s): Adelaida María Castro-Sánchez, Guillermo A Matarán-Peñarrocha, Inmaculada Lara-Palomo, Manuel Saavedra-Hernández, Manuel Arroyo-Morales, Carmen Moreno-Lorenzo Article Affiliation: Department of Nursing and Physical Therapy, University of Almeria (UAL), Carretera de Sacramento s/n, 04120 Almería, Granada, Spain. Abstract: Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating neurological disease. Several studies have reported that complementary and alternative therapies can have positive effects against pain in these patients. Objective. The objective was to investigate the effectiveness of an Ai-Chi aquatic exercise program against pain and other symptoms in MS patients. Methods. In this randomized controlled trial, 73 MS patients were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group for a 20-week treatment program. The experimental group underwent 40 sessions of Ai-Chi exercise in swimming pool and the control group 40 sessions of abdominal breathing and contraction-relaxation exercises in therapy room. Outcome variables were pain, disability, spasm, depression, fatigue, and autonomy, which were assessed before the intervention and immediately and at 4 and 10 weeks after the last treatment session. Results. The experimental group showed a significant (P<0.028) and clinically relevant decrease in pain intensity versus baseline, with an immediate posttreatment reduction in median visual analogue scale scores of 50% that was maintained for up to 10 weeks. Significant improvements were also observed in spasm, fatigue, disability, and autonomy. Conclusion. According to these findings, an Ai-Chi aquatic exercise program improves pain, spasms, disability, fatigue, depression, and autonomy in MS patients. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2012
Therapeutic Ai-Chi Aquatic Exercise

NCBI pubmed

An Ai Chi-based aquatic group improves balance and reduces falls in community-dwelling adults: A pilot observational cohort study.

Related Articles An Ai Chi-based aquatic group improves balance and reduces falls in community-dwelling adults: A pilot observational cohort study. Physiother Theory Pract. 2016 Nov;32(8):581-590 Authors: Skinner EH, Dinh T, Hewitt M, Piper R, Thwaites C Abstract BACKGROUND: Falls are associated with morbidity, loss of independence, and mortality. While land-based group exercise and Tai Chi programs reduce the risk of falls, aquatic therapy may allow patients to complete balance exercises with less pain and fear of falling; however, limited data exist. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to pilot the implementation of an aquatic group based on Ai Chi principles (Aquabalance) and to evaluate the safety, intervention acceptability, and intervention effect sizes. DESIGN: Pilot observational cohort study. METHODS: Forty-two outpatients underwent a single 45-minute weekly group aquatic Ai Chi-based session for eight weeks (Aquabalance). Safety was monitored using organizational reporting systems. Patient attendance, satisfaction, and self-reported falls were also recorded. Balance measures included the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, the Four Square Step Test (FSST), and the unilateral Step Tests. RESULTS: Forty-two patients completed the program. It was feasible to deliver Aquabalance, as evidenced by the median (IQR) attendance rate of 8.0 (7.8, 8.0) out of 8. No adverse events occurred and participants reported high satisfaction levels. Improvements were noted on the TUG, 10-meter walk test, the Functional Reach Test, the FSST, and the unilateral step tests (p < 0.05). The proportion of patients defined as high falls risk reduced from 38% to 21%. The study was limited by its small sample size, single-center nature, and the absence of a control group. CONCLUSIONS: Aquabalance was safe, well-attended, and acceptable to participants. A randomized controlled assessor-blinded trial is required. PMID: 27710164 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]