Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Glutamic and Aspartic Acid Reduced (G.A.R.D)

The effect of dietary glutamate on fibromyalgia and irritable bowel symptoms. 📎

Abstract Title: The effect of dietary glutamate on fibromyalgia and irritable bowel symptoms. Abstract Source: Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2012 Jul 4. Epub 2012 Jul 4. PMID: 22766026 Abstract Author(s): Kathleen F Holton, Douglas L Taren, Cynthia A Thomson, Robert M Bennett, Kim D Jones Article Affiliation: Departments of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Oregon Health&Science University, Portland, OR, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of a challenge with monosodium glutamate (MSG) as compared to placebo on the symptoms of fibromyalgia (FM), in participants who initially experienced>30% remission of symptoms on an excitotoxin elimination diet. METHODS: Fifty-seven FM patients who also had irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were placed on a 4-week diet that excluded dietary additive excitotoxins including MSG and aspartame. Thirty-seven people completed the diet and 84% of those reported that>30% of their symptoms resolved, thus making them eligible to proceed to challenges. Subjects who improved on the diet were then randomised to a 2-week double-blind placebo-controlled crossover challenge with MSG or placebo for 3 consecutive days each week. The primary outcome measure was total symptom score. Secondary outcome measures included visual analogue pain scales (VAS for FM and IBS), an IBS Quality of Life Questionnaire (IBS QOL) and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR). Repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyse crossover challenge results. RESULTS: The MSG challenge, as compared to placebo, resulted in a significant return of symptoms (total symptom score, p<0.02); a worsening of fibromyalgia severity as determined by the FIQR (p<0.03); decreased quality of life in regards to IBS symptoms (IBS QOL, p<0.05); and a non-significant trend toward worsening FM pain based on visual analogue scale (VAS, p<0.07). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that dietary glutamate may be contributing to FM symptoms in some patients. Future research on the role of dietary excitotoxins in FM is warranted. Article Published Date : Jul 03, 2012
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Glutamic and Aspartic Acid Reduced (G.A.R.D)

NCBI pubmed

Associations of neurofunctional, morphometric and metabolic abnormalities with clinical symptom severity and recognition deficit in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Related Articles Associations of neurofunctional, morphometric and metabolic abnormalities with clinical symptom severity and recognition deficit in obsessive-compulsive disorder. J Affect Disord. 2018 02;227:603-612 Authors: Moon CM, Jeong GW Abstract BACKGROUND: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) causes neural dysfunction associated with cognitive deficit and emotional dysregulation. This study assessed the associations of the neurofunctional changes, gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume alterations in conjunction with in vivo metabolic changes on the working memory tasks in patients with OCD. METHODS: Eighteen patients with OCD and 18 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and educational levels underwent high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), event-related functional MRI (fMRI), and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at 3T. RESULTS: In fMRI, patients with OCD showed lower activities in the cerebellum, inferior temporal gyrus, orbitofrontal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and calcarine gyrus compared to the controls. In VBM, the patients showed significantly reduced GM volumes, especially in the cerebellum, hippocampus, and superior temporal gyrus, together with significantly reduced WM volumes in the retrolenticular part of the internal capsule, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and orbitofrontal gyrus. In 1H-MRS, the ratios of N-acetylaspartate/creatine and choline/creatine were significantly lower in the DLPFC of the patients than in the controls, whereas the ratio of β∙γ-glutamine-glutamate/creatine was significantly higher in the patients than in the controls. LIMITATIONS: This study examined small numbers of subjects in each one of the groups. CONCLUSIONS: The findings will be helpful to aid us in understanding of neurocognitive impairment in OCD, and thus, enhancing the diagnostic accuracy for OCD by additional information on the associated brain functional deficit, cerebral volume change and metabolic abnormality. PMID: 29172053 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]