Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - High-Fat-Low-Carbohydrate

High-fat and ketogenic diets in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 📎

Abstract Title: High-fat and ketogenic diets in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Abstract Source: J Child Neurol. 2013 Aug ;28(8):989-92. Epub 2013 May 10. PMID: 23666040 Abstract Author(s): Sabrina Paganoni, Anne-Marie Wills Article Affiliation: Sabrina Paganoni Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease. Epidemiologic data suggest that malnutrition is a common feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and being overweight or obese confers a survival advantage in this patient population. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse models, a high-fat diet has been shown to lead to weight gain and prolonged survival. However, little research has been conducted to test whether nutritional interventions might ameliorate the disease course in humans. Here we review the currently available evidence supporting the potential role of dietary interventions as a therapeutic tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Ultimately, determining whether a high-fat or ketogenic diet could be beneficial in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will require large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Article Published Date : Jul 31, 2013

Dietary treatment of diabetes mellitus in the pre-insulin era (1914-1922).

Abstract Title: Dietary treatment of diabetes mellitus in the pre-insulin era (1914-1922). Abstract Source: Perspect Biol Med. 2006;49(1):77-83. PMID: 16489278 Abstract Author(s): [No authors listed] Abstract: Before the discovery of insulin, one of the most common dietary treatments of diabetes mellitus was a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. A review of Frederick M. Allen's case histories shows that a 70% fat, 8% carbohydrate diet could eliminate glycosuria among hospitalized patients. A reconsideration of the role of the high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet for the treatment of diabetes mellitus is in order. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2006
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION High-Fat-Low-Carbohydrate

NCBI pubmed

The mechanisms mediating the antiepileptic effects of the ketogenic diet, and potential opportunities for improvement with metabolism-altering drugs.

Related Articles The mechanisms mediating the antiepileptic effects of the ketogenic diet, and potential opportunities for improvement with metabolism-altering drugs. Seizure. 2017 Nov;52:15-19 Authors: Youngson NA, Morris MJ, Ballard JWO Abstract The ketogenic diet (KD) is increasingly being used to treat patients with intractable epilepsy. Despite decades of research, the reason for its success, when anticonvulsants have failed, is still not completely understood. There are, however, many candidate mechanisms which can be grouped into those that alter neuronal excitability at the synapse, and those that confer neuroprotection. The molecular underpinning of these mechanisms centres on the shift from glucose- to lipid-based energy generation that accompanies a high fat/low carbohydrate diet. Here we describe how changes in the relative abundances of energy substrates (ketone bodies), intermediates of glycolysis and fat metabolism, and metabolic end products (ATP, reactive oxygen species) underlie many of the antiepileptic effects of the KD. We propose that the success of the KD for treating epilepsy lies in the large variety of antiepileptic mechanisms that it confers. Different subsets of the mechanisms may be clinically relevant in different patients. We extend this to suggest that the broad benefits of the KD could therefore be achieved by pharmacologically promoting the production of ketone bodies in the liver as they represent a key mediator that is common to all of the proposed mechanisms. PMID: 28941398 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]