Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - High-fiber-high-fruit-high-vegetable-low-fat

Short term health impact of a yoga and diet change program on obesity. 📎

Abstract Title: Short term health impact of a yoga and diet change program on obesity. Abstract Source: Med Sci Monit. 2010 Jan;16(1):CR35-40. PMID: 20037492 Abstract Author(s): Shirley Telles, Visweswaraiah K Naveen, Acharya Balkrishna, Sanjay Kumar Abstract: BACKGROUND: Obese persons often find physical activity difficult. The effects of a yoga and diet change program, emphasizing breathing techniques practiced while seated, was assessed in obese persons. MATERIAL/METHODS: A single group of 47 persons were assessed on the first and last day of a yoga and diet change program, with 6 days of the intervention between assessments. The assessments were: body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumferences, mid-arm circumference, body composition, hand grip strength, postural stability, serum lipid profile and fasting serum leptin levels. Participants practiced yoga for 5 hours every day and had a low fat, high fiber, vegetarian diet. Last and first day data were compared using a t-test for paired data. RESULTS: Following the 6-day residential program, participants showed a decrease in BMI (1.6 percent), waist and hip circumferences, fat-free mass, total cholesterol (7.7 percent decrease), high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (8.7 percent decrease), fasting serum leptin levels (44.2 percent decrease) and an increase in postural stability and hand grip strength (p<0.05, all comparisons). CONCLUSIONS: A 6-day yoga and diet change program decreased the BMI and the fat-free mass. Total cholesterol also decreased due to reduced HDL levels. This suggests that a brief, intensive yoga program with a change in diet can pose certain risks. Benefits seen were better postural stability, grip strength (though a 'practice effect' was not ruled out), reduced waist and hip circumferences and a decrease in serum leptin levels. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2010

The effect of strict adherence to a high-fiber, high-fruit and -vegetable, and low-fat eating pattern on adenoma recurrence. 📎

Abstract Title: The effect of strict adherence to a high-fiber, high-fruit and -vegetable, and low-fat eating pattern on adenoma recurrence. Abstract Source: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Sep 1;170(5):576-84. Epub 2009 Jul 30. PMID: 19643809 Abstract Author(s): Leah B Sansbury, Kay Wanke, Paul S Albert, Lisa Kahle, Arthur Schatzkin, Elaine Lanza, Abstract: Individual differences in dietary intake are thought to account for substantial variation in cancer incidence. However, there has been a consistent lack of effect for low-fat, high-fiber dietary interventions and risk of colorectal cancer. These inconsistencies may reflect the multistage process of cancer as well as the range and timing of dietary change. Another potential reason for the lack of effect is poor dietary adherence among participants in these trials. The authors examined the effect of strict adherence to a low-fat, high-fiber, high-fruit and -vegetable intervention over 4 years among participants (n = 1,905) in the US Polyp Prevention Trial (1991-1998) on colorectal adenoma recurrence. There was a wide range of individual variation in the level of compliance among intervention participants. The most adherent participants, defined as "super compliers" (n = 210), consistently reported that they met or exceeded each of the 3 dietary goals at all 4 annual visits. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between dietary adherence and adenoma recurrence. The authors observed a 35% reduced odds of adenoma recurrence among super compliers compared with controls (odds ratio = 0.65, 95% confidence interval: 0.47, 0.92). Findings suggest that high compliance with a low-fat, high-fiber diet is associated with reduced risk of adenoma recurrence. Article Published Date : Sep 01, 2009
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION High-fiber-high-fruit-high-vegetable-low-fat

NCBI pubmed

Favorable Effects of a Ketogenic Diet on Physical Function, Perceived Energy, and Food Cravings in Women with Ovarian or Endometrial Cancer: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

Related Articles Favorable Effects of a Ketogenic Diet on Physical Function, Perceived Energy, and Food Cravings in Women with Ovarian or Endometrial Cancer: A Randomized, Controlled Trial. Nutrients. 2018 Aug 30;10(9): Authors: Cohen CW, Fontaine KR, Arend RC, Soleymani T, Gower BA Abstract Ketogenic diets (KDs) are gaining attention as a potential adjuvant therapy for cancer, but data are limited for KDs' effects on quality of life. We hypothesized that the KD would (1) improve mental and physical function, including energy levels, (2) reduce hunger, and (3) diminish sweet and starchy food cravings in women with ovarian or endometrial cancer. Participants were randomized to a KD (70:25:5 energy from fat, protein, and carbohydrate) or the American Cancer Society diet (ACS: high-fiber, lower-fat). Questionnaires were administered at baseline and after 12 weeks on the assigned diet to assess changes in mental and physical health, perceived energy, appetite, and food cravings. We assessed both between-group differences and within-group changes using ANCOVA and paired t-tests, respectively. After 12 weeks, there was a significant between-group difference in adjusted physical function scores (p < 0.05), and KD participants not receiving chemotherapy reported a significant within-group reduction in fatigue (p < 0.05). There were no significant between-group differences in mental function, hunger, or appetite. There was a significant between-group difference in adjusted cravings for starchy foods and fast food fats at 12 weeks (p < 0.05 for both), with the KD group demonstrating less frequent cravings than the ACS. In conclusion, in women with ovarian or endometrial cancer, a KD does not negatively affect quality of life and in fact may improve physical function, increase energy, and diminish specific food cravings. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT03171506. PMID: 30200193 [PubMed - in process]