Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Low Calorie Diet

Nigella sativa oil with a calorie-restricted diet can improve biomarkers of systemic inflammation in obese women: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Abstract Title: Nigella sativa oil with a calorie-restricted diet can improve biomarkers of systemic inflammation in obese women: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Abstract Source: J Clin Lipidol. 2016 Sep-Oct;10(5):1203-11. Epub 2015 Dec 7. PMID: 27678438 Abstract Author(s): Reza Mahdavi, Nazli Namazi, Mohammad Alizadeh, Safar Farajnia Article Affiliation: Reza Mahdavi Abstract: BACKGROUND: Inflammation is one of the primary mechanisms in the development of metabolic complications. Although anti-inflammatory characteristics of Nigella sativa (NS) have been indicated in animal models, clinical trials related to the effects of NS on inflammatory parameters are relatively scarce. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of NS oil combined with a calorie-restricted diet on systemic inflammatory biomarkers in obese women. METHODS: In this double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial, 90 volunteer obese (body mass index = 30-34.9 kg/m(2)) women aged 25-50 years were recruited. Participants were randomly divided into two groups, an intervention group (n = 45) and a placebo group (n = 45). Each group received either: (1) a low-calorie diet with 3 g/day of NS oil or (2) a low-calorie diet with 3 g/day placebo for 8 weeks. RESULTS: A total of 84 females (intervention group = 43; placebo group = 41) completed the trial. Subjects in the intervention group did not report any side effects with the NS oil supplementation. NS oil decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (-40.8% vs -16.1%, P = .04) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-54.5% vs -21.4%, P = .01) compared to the placebo group. However, there were no significant changes in interleukin-6 levels (-8.6 vs -2.4%, P = .6) in the NS group compared to the placebo group. CONCLUSIONS: NS oil supplementation combined with a calorie-restricted diet may modulate systemic inflammatory biomarkers in obese women. However, more studies are needed to clarify the efficacy of NS oil as an adjunct therapy to improve inflammatory parameters in obese subjects. Article Published Date : Aug 31, 2016

Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Conventional Versus Intensive Insulin Therapy: Efficacy of Low-Calorie Dietary Intervention.

Abstract Title: Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Conventional Versus Intensive Insulin Therapy: Efficacy of Low-Calorie Dietary Intervention. Abstract Source: Adv Ther. 2016 Feb 17. Epub 2016 Feb 17. PMID: 26886777 Abstract Author(s): Dimitrios Baltzis, Maria G Grammatikopoulou, Nikolaos Papanas, Christina-Maria Trakatelli, Evangelia Kintiraki, Maria N Hassapidou, Christos Manes Article Affiliation: Dimitrios Baltzis Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The aim of this prospective study was to assess the results of a standard low-calorie dietary intervention (7.5 MJ/day) on body weight (BW) and the metabolic profile of obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on intensive insulin therapy (IIT: 4 insulin injections/day) versus conventional insulin therapy (CIT: 2/3 insulin injections/day). METHODS: A total of 60 patients (n = 60, 23 males and 37 postmenopausal females) were recruited and categorized into two groups according to the scheme of insulin treatment. Thirty were on IIT (13 males and 17 females) and an equal number on CIT (10 males and 20 females). BW, body mass index (BMI), HbA1c, and metabolic parameters were compared at 6 and 12 months after baseline. RESULTS: Significant reductions were observed in the BW, BMI, HbA1c (p ≤ 0.001 for all) and cholesterol (p ≤ 0.05) at 6 months post-intervention. At 1 year, median BW reduction was 4.5 kg (3.3, 5.8) for patients on IIT and 4.8 kg (3.6, 7.0) for those on CIT. The 12-month dietary intervention increased prevalence of normoglycemia in the IIT group and reduced the prevalence of obesity prevalence among the CIT participants (all p < 0.001). CIT patients with BW reduction ≥5.0% demonstrated 11-fold greater chances of being normoglycemic (odds ratio 11.3, 95% CI 1.1-110.5). BW reduction ≥7.0% was associated with CIT, being overweight, and having normal HDLc, LDLc, and cholesterol levels. A reduction in BW between 5.0% and 6.9% was associated with IIT, normoglycemia, and obesity. CONCLUSION: A 12-month 1800-kcal dietary intervention achieved significant BW and HbA1c reductions irrespectively of insulin regimen. CIT was associated with BW reduction greater than 8.0%, whereas IIT was associated with higher rates of normoglycemia. Article Published Date : Feb 16, 2016

Oxidative Stress Responses to Nigella sativa Oil Concurrent with a Low-Calorie Diet in Obese Women: A Randomized, Double-Blind Controlled Clinical Trial.

Abstract Title: Oxidative Stress Responses to Nigella sativa Oil Concurrent with a Low-Calorie Diet in Obese Women: A Randomized, Double-Blind Controlled Clinical Trial. Abstract Source: Phytother Res. 2015 Jul 14. Epub 2015 Jul 14. PMID: 26179113 Abstract Author(s): Nazli Namazi, Reza Mahdavi, Mohammad Alizadeh, Safar Farajnia Article Affiliation: Nazli Namazi Abstract: The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of Nigella sativa (NS) oil concurrent with a low-calorie diet on lipid peroxidation and oxidative status in obese women. In this double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial, 50 volunteer obese (body mass index = 30-35 kg/m(2) ) women aged 25-50 years old were recruited. Participants were randomly divided into intervention (n = 25) and placebo (n = 25) groups. They received a low-calorie diet with 3 g/day NS oil or low-calorie diet with 3 g/day placebo for 8 weeks. Forty-nine women (intervention group = 25; placebo group = 24) completed the trial. NS oil concurrent with a low-calorie diet decreased weight in the NS group compared to the placebo group (-4.80 ± 1.50 vs. -1.40 ± 1.90 kg; p < 0.01). Comparison of red blood cell superoxidase dismutase (SOD) indicated significant changes in the NS group compared to the placebo group at the end of the study (88.98 ± 87.46 vs. -3.30 ± 109.80 U/gHb; p < 0.01). But no significant changes in lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase, and total antioxidant capacity concentrations were observed. NS oil concurrent with a low-calorie diet decreased weight and increased SOD levels in obese women. However, more studies are suggested to confirm the positive effects of NS in obesity and its complications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley&Sons, Ltd. Article Published Date : Jul 13, 2015

Lifestyle intervention with weight reduction: first-line treatment in mild obstructive sleep apnea. 📎

Abstract Title: Lifestyle intervention with weight reduction: first-line treatment in mild obstructive sleep apnea. Abstract Source: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009 Feb 15;179(4):320-7. Epub 2008 Nov 14. PMID: 19011153 Abstract Author(s): Henri P I Tuomilehto, Juha M Seppä, Markku M Partinen, Markku Peltonen, Helena Gylling, Jaakko O I Tuomilehto, Esko J Vanninen, Jouko Kokkarinen, Johanna K Sahlman, Tarja Martikainen, Erkki J O Soini, Jukka Randell, Hannu Tukiainen, Matti Uusitupa, Abstract: RATIONALE: Obesity is the most important risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, although included in clinical guidelines, no randomized controlled studies have been performed on the effects of weight reduction on mild OSA. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this prospective, randomized controlled parallel-group 1-year follow-up study was to determine whether a very low calorie diet (VLCD) with supervised lifestyle counseling could be an effective treatment for adults with mild OSA. METHODS: Seventy-two consecutive overweight patients (body mass index, 28-40) with mild OSA were recruited. The intervention group (n = 35) completed the VLCD program with supervised lifestyle modification, and the control group (n = 37) received routine lifestyle counseling. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was the main objectively measured outcome variable. Change in symptoms and the 15D-Quality of Life tool were used as subjective measurements. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The lifestyle intervention was found to effectively reduce body weight (-10.7 +/- 6.5 kg; body mass index, -3.5 +/- 2.1 [mean +/- SD]). There was a statistically significant difference in the mean change in AHI between the study groups (P = 0.017). The adjusted odds ratio for having mild OSA was markedly lowered (odds ratio, 0.24 [95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.72]; P = 0.011) in the intervention group. All common symptoms related to OSA, and some features of 15D-Quality of Life improved after the lifestyle intervention. Changes in AHI were strongly associated with changes in weight and waist circumference. CONCLUSIONS: VLCD combined with active lifestyle counseling resulting in marked weight reduction is a feasible and effective treatment for the majority of patients with mild OSA, and the achieved beneficial outcomes are maintained at 1-year follow-up. Article Published Date : Feb 15, 2009

Almonds vs complex carbohydrates in a weight reduction program.

Abstract Title: Almonds vs complex carbohydrates in a weight reduction program. Abstract Source: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003 Nov;27(11):1365-72. PMID: 14574348 Abstract Author(s): M A Wien, J M Sabaté, D N Iklé, S E Cole, F R Kandeel Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of an almond-enriched (high monounsaturated fat, MUFA) or complex carbohydrate-enriched (high carbohydrate) formula-based low-calorie diet (LCD) on anthropometric, body composition and metabolic parameters in a weight reduction program. DESIGN: A randomized, prospective 24-week trial in a free-living population evaluating two distinct macronutrient interventions on obesity and metabolic syndrome-related parameters during weight reduction. SUBJECTS: In total, 65 overweight and obese adults (age: 27-79 y, body mass index (BMI): 27-55 kg/m(2)). INTERVENTION: A formula-based LCD enriched with 84 g/day of almonds (almond-LCD; 39% total fat, 25% MUFA and 32% carbohydrate as percent of dietary energy) or self-selected complex carbohydrates (CHO-LCD; 18% total fat, 5% MUFA and 53% carbohydrate as percent of dietary energy) featuring equivalent calories and protein. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Various anthropometric, body composition and metabolic parameters at baseline, during and after 24 weeks of dietary intervention. RESULTS: LCD supplementation with almonds, in contrast to complex carbohydrates, was associated with greater reductions in weight/BMI (-18 vs -11%), waist circumference (WC) (-14 vs -9%), fat mass (FM) (-30 vs -20%), total body water (-8 vs -1%) and systolic blood pressure (-11 vs 0%), P=0.0001-0.05. A 62% greater reduction in weight/BMI, 50% greater reduction in WC and 56% greater reduction in FM were observed in the almond-LCD as compared to the CHO-LCD intervention. Ketone levels increased only in the almond-LCD group (+260 vs 0%, P<0.02). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increased in the CHO-LCD group and decreased in the almond-LCD group (+15 vs -6%, P=0.05). Glucose, insulin, diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and LDL-C to HDL-C ratio decreased significantly to a similar extent in both dietary interventions. Homeostasis model analysis of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) decreased in both study groups over time (almond-LCD: -66% and CHO-LCD: -35%, P<0.0001). Among subjects with type 2 diabetes, diabetes medication reductions were sustained or further reduced in a greater proportion of almond-LCD as compared to CHO-LCD subjects (96 vs 50%, respectively) [correction].  CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that an almond-enriched LCD improves a preponderance of the abnormalities associated with the metabolic syndrome. Both dietary interventions were effective in decreasing body weight beyond the weight loss observed during long-term pharmacological interventions; however, the almond-LCD group experienced a sustained and greater weight reduction for the duration of the 24-week intervention. Almond supplementation of a formula-based LCD is a novel alternative to self-selected complex carbohydrates and has a potential role in reducing the public health implications of obesity. Article Published Date : Nov 01, 2003
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Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Low Calorie Diet

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Caloric Restriction Prevents Carcinogen-Initiated Liver Tumorigenesis in Mice.

Related Articles Caloric Restriction Prevents Carcinogen-Initiated Liver Tumorigenesis in Mice. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2017 Nov;10(11):660-670 Authors: Ploeger JM, Manivel JC, Boatner LN, Mashek DG Abstract Caloric restriction (CR) and endurance exercise elicit wide-ranging health benefits including reduced risk of select cancers. In addition, diet composition influences oncogenesis, although its interactions with exercise and CR are not well understood. Therefore, to investigate the potential interactions between diet and lifestyle interventions on liver tumorigenesis, the carcinogen diethylnitrosamine was administered to 72 male C57Bl/6 mice that were subsequently fed diets enriched with lard (CTL) or olive oil and were further stratified to voluntary wheel running (Ex) or 30% CR for 49 weeks. Although Ex and diet composition did not influence liver oncogenesis, CR prevented hepatic tumor formation. In addition, CR reduced steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning, inflammation, and immune cell infiltration, all of which are hallmarks in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to liver tumorigenesis. RNA sequencing of nontransformed liver tissues from CR mice revealed changes in metabolic pathways and reduced inflammation, cytokine production, stellate cell activation and migration, and genes associated with liver injury and oncogenesis. These data demonstrate that CR protects against steatosis, liver inflammation, and liver injury and is a robust deterrent of carcinogen-induced hepatic oncogenesis. Cancer Prev Res; 10(11); 660-70. ©2017 AACR. PMID: 28847977 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Prevalence of renal uric acid stones in the adult.

Related Articles Prevalence of renal uric acid stones in the adult. Urolithiasis. 2017 Dec;45(6):553-562 Authors: Trinchieri A, Montanari E Abstract The aim of this study was to estimate uric acid renal stone prevalence rates of adults in different countries of the world. PubMed was searched for papers dealing with "urinary calculi and prevalence or composition" for the period from January 1996 to June 2016. Alternative searches were made to collect further information on specific topics. The prevalence rate of uric acid stones was computed by the general renal stone prevalence rate and the frequency of uric acid stones in each country. After the initial search, 2180 papers were extracted. Out of them, 79 papers were selected after the reading of the titles and of the abstracts. For ten countries, papers relating to both the renal stone prevalence in the general population and the frequency of uric stones were available. Additional search produced 13 papers that completed information on 11 more countries in 5 continents. Estimated prevalence rate of uric acid stones was >0.75% in Thailand, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Iran, South Africa (white population), United States and Australia; ranged 0.50-0.75% in Turkey, Israel, Italy, India (Southern), Spain, Taiwan, Germany, Brazil; and <0.50% in Tunisia, China, Korea, Japan, Caribe, South Africa (blacks), India (Northern). Climate and diet are major determinants of uric acid stone formation. A hot and dry climate increases fluid losses reducing urinary volume and urinary pH. A diet rich in meat protein causes low urinary pH and increased uric acid excretion. On the other hand, uric acid stone formation is frequently associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes type 2 that are linked to dietary energy excess mainly from carbohydrate and saturated fat and also present with low urine pH values. An epidemic of uric acid stone formation could be if current nutritional trends will be maintained both in developed countries and in developing countries and the areas of greater climatic risk for the formation of uric acid stones will enlarge as result of the "global warming". PMID: 28258472 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]