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Reversal of premature ovarian failure in a patient with Sjögren syndrome using an elimination diet protocol.

Abstract Title: Reversal of premature ovarian failure in a patient with Sjögren syndrome using an elimination diet protocol. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jul;16(7):807-9. PMID: 20618099 Abstract Author(s): Joe Feuerstein Article Affiliation: Department of Integrative Medicine, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, CT 06902, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Premature ovarian failure is diagnosed with a picture of amenorrhea, elevated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and age under 40 years. Twenty percent (20%) of patients with premature ovarian failure have a concomitant autoimmune disease. Cases of premature ovarian failure associated with Sjögren syndrome have been reported in the literature. PATIENT AND METHOD: We report a case of a 42-year-old white woman with Sjögren syndrome and premature ovarian failure who underwent a reversal of her premature ovarian failure and restoration of normal menses using an elimination diet protocol. The patient was diagnosed with her rheumatological condition in 2005 and started on disease-modifying antirheumatoid drugs, which were taken intermittently due to a concern over medication side-effects. Her menses became irregular at the time of initial diagnosis and finally ceased in 2006, with a dramatic elevation in her FSH, indicative of autoimmune-induced premature ovarian failure. In March 2009, she commenced an elimination diet protocol, eliminating gluten, beef, eggs, dairy products, nightshade vegetables, refined sugars, and citrus fruit for 4 months. RESULTS: Her repeat laboratory tests after 4 months showed a drop in FSH from 88 to 6.5 and a drop in erythrocyte sedimentation rate from 40 to 16. Her menses also resumed and her rheumatological symptoms significantly improved. CONCLUSIONS: It is hypothesized that the restoration of normal menses was caused by reduced inflammation in the ovarian tissue and supports the hypothesis that the gut immune system can influence autoimmune disease and inflammation. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2010
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Nightshade Free

NCBI pubmed

Comparable effects of breakfast meals varying in protein source on appetite and subsequent energy intake in healthy males.

Related Articles Comparable effects of breakfast meals varying in protein source on appetite and subsequent energy intake in healthy males. Eur J Nutr. 2018 Apr;57(3):1097-1108 Authors: Dougkas A, Östman E Abstract PURPOSE: The satiating effect of animal vs plant proteins remains unknown. The present study examined the effects of breakfasts containing animal proteins [milk (AP)], a blend of plant proteins [oat, pea and potato (VP)] or 50:50 mixture of the two (MP) compared with a carbohydrate-rich meal (CHO) on appetite, energy intake (EI) and metabolic measures. METHODS: A total of 28 males [mean age 27.4 (±SD 4.2) years, BMI 23.4 (±2.1) kg/m2] consumed three isoenergetic (1674 kJ) rice puddings matched for energy density and macronutrient content as breakfast (25% E from protein) in a single-blind, randomised, cross over design. Appetite ratings and blood samples were collected and assessed at baseline and every 30 and 60 min, respectively, until an ad libitum test meal was served 3.5 h later. Free-living appetite was recorded hourly and EI in weighed food records for the remainder of the day. RESULTS: No differences in subjective appetite ratings were observed after consumption of the AP, VP and MP. Furthermore, there were no differences between the AP, VP, MP and CHO breakfasts in ad libitum EI and self-reported EI during the remainder of the day. Although insulin metabolism was not affected, CHO induced a higher glucose response (P = 0.001) and total amino acids concentration was in the order of AP = MP > VP > CHO breakfast (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Manipulating the protein source of foods consumed as breakfast, elicited comparable effects on appetite and EI at both laboratory and free-living environment in healthy men. PMID: 28243787 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]