Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Environmental Exposure - Dead Sea climatotherapy

The effect of the Dead Sea environment on uveitis. 📎

Abstract Title: The effect of the Dead Sea environment on uveitis. Abstract Source: Neurol Res. 2010 Feb;32 Suppl 1:27-30. PMID: 15729957 Abstract Author(s): Ronit Yagev, Erez Tsumi, Joan Avigur, Pavel Polyakov, Jacov Levy, Tova Lifshitz Article Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Soroka University Medical Center and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Uveitis is an acute or chronic inflammatory process of the uvea caused by a number of etiologies. In many patients the etiology is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of the Dead Sea environment (climatotherapy) on the signs, symptoms and clinical course of chronic uveitis. METHODS: Fifty-five patients with chronic uveitis were examined at the beginning and end of a 3-4 week stay at the Dead Sea region and on repeat visits to the region. Study data included demographic information, medical history, etiology, diagnosis, medication, and a complete ophthalmic examination. RESULTS: Statistically significant improvements were seen between the two examinations within each visit in four parameters (negative values indicate improvement): a) visual acuity for near and far: Jaeger (-0.98 +/- 0.18, P Article Published Date : Feb 01, 2010
Therapeutic Actions Environmental Exposure - Dead Sea climatotherapy

NCBI pubmed

Vitiligo in Children: What's New in Treatment?

Related Articles Vitiligo in Children: What's New in Treatment? Open Access Maced J Med Sci. 2018 Jan 25;6(1):221-225 Authors: Gianfaldoni S, Tchernev G, Wollina U, Lotti J, Rovesti M, Satolli F, França K, Lotti T Abstract Vitiligo is an acquired chronic hypopigmentary disorder, which usually stars in childhood. The Authors discuss a short review of the more innovative therapies for childhood vitiligo. PMID: 29484028 [PubMed]
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