Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Exercise Strength Training

Effect of strength training on resting metabolic rate and physical activity: age and gender comparisons.

Abstract Title: Effect of strength training on resting metabolic rate and physical activity: age and gender comparisons. Abstract Source: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Apr ;33(4):532-41. PMID: 11283427 Abstract Author(s): J T Lemmer, F M Ivey, A S Ryan, G F Martel, D E Hurlbut, J E Metter, J L Fozard, J L Fleg, B F Hurley Article Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Performance, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. Abstract: PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare age and gender effects of strength training (ST) on resting metabolic rate (RMR), energy expenditure of physical activity (EEPA), and body composition. METHODS: RMR and EEPA were measured before and after 24 wk of ST in 10 young men (20-30 yr), 9 young women (20-30 yr), 11 older men (65-75 yr), and 10 older women (65-75 yr). RESULTS: When all subjects were pooled together, absolute RMR significantly increased by 7% (5928 +/- 1225 vs 6328 +/- 1336 kJ.d-1, P<0.001). Furthermore, ST increased absolute RMR by 7% in both young (6302 +/- 1458 vs 6719 +/- 1617 kJ x d(-1), P<0.01) and older (5614 +/- 916 vs 5999 +/- 973 kJ x d(-1), P<0.05) subjects, with no significant interaction between the two age groups. In contrast, there was a significant gender x time interaction (P<0.05) for absolute RMR with men increasing RMR by 9% (6645 +/- 1073 vs 7237 +/- 1150 kJ x d(-1), P<0.001), whereas women showed no significant increase (5170 +/- 884 vs 5366 +/- 692 kJ x d(-1), P = 0.108). When RMR was adjusted for fat-free mass (FFM) using ANCOVA, with all subjects pooled together, there was still a significant increase in RMR with ST. Additionally, there was still a gender effect (P<0.05) and no significant age effect (P = NS), with only the men still showing a significant elevation in RMR. Moreover, EEPA and TEE estimated with a Tritrac accelerometer and TEE estimated by the Stanford Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall Questionnaire did not change in response to ST for any group. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, changes in absolute and relative RMR in response to ST are influenced by gender but not age. In contrast to what has been suggested previously, changes in body composition in response to ST are not due to changes in physical activity outside of training. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2001
Therapeutic Actions EXERCISE Strength Training

NCBI pubmed

Breaking habits with mindful snacking? An email-based intervention targeting unwanted snacking habits in an Australian sample.

Related Articles Breaking habits with mindful snacking? An email-based intervention targeting unwanted snacking habits in an Australian sample. Eat Behav. 2018 Nov 30;32:37-43 Authors: Dibb-Smith A, Chapman J, Brindal E Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential for an email-based, mindful eating exercise to improve unwanted snacking habits. METHOD: Australian participants (N = 78, 86% female) with unwanted snacking habits engaged in a mindful eating email-based intervention, over a practice period of two weeks. All measures were completed using an online survey. Habit strength was measured using the Self-Report Habit Index (SHRI). Mindful eating was measured using the Mindful Eating Questionnaire (MEQ) and self-compassion was measured using the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS). Participants were emailed a mindful eating exercise and asked to make action plans to practice it. Reminders to perform the task were sent via email after one week. After two weeks, the MEQ, SCS and SHRI were readministered. RESULTS: Habit strength significantly increased over the two-week period and self-compassion significantly decreased. The amount of practice reported was not associated with these changes, but self-reported effort expended during practice sessions was partially associated. DISCUSSION: The intervention resulted in increased habit strength; potential mechanisms underlying these changes are discussed. Decreased self-compassion may be linked to both the electronic delivery of the intervention and the nature of the mindful eating task. PMID: 30557746 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Effects of Structured Exercise Training in Children and Adolescents With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

Related Articles Effects of Structured Exercise Training in Children and Adolescents With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Pediatr Phys Ther. 2019 Jan;31(1):3-21 Authors: Klepper S, Mano Khan TT, Klotz R, Gregorek AO, Chan YC, Sawade S Abstract PURPOSE: To examine safety and efficacy of exercise training (ET) for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to improve physical fitness, pain, functional capability, and quality of life. METHODS: Ovid Medline, PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, and Web of Science were searched from 1995 to April 2018 to find English-language articles examining effects of ET in JIA, ages 4 to 21 years. Quality of evidence/strength of clinical recommendations were assessed using the Cochrane GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Results were reported using the 2009 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist for health care interventions. RESULTS: Nine papers met inclusion criteria. A total of 457 individuals with JIA, ages 4 to 19.9 years, received ET or alternate activity, wait-list, or no intervention. Moderate-quality evidence supports Stott Pilates and underwater knee-resistance exercise. No adverse effects of ET were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Moderate-quality evidence exists for ET (30-50 minutes, 2-3 times/week, 12-24 weeks) to decrease pain, improve range of motion, knee strength, functional capability, and quality of life in JIA. PMID: 30557274 [PubMed - in process]

Lumbar stabilisation exercises versus back endurance-resistance exercise training in athletes with chronic low back pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

Related Articles Lumbar stabilisation exercises versus back endurance-resistance exercise training in athletes with chronic low back pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open Sport Exerc Med. 2018;4(1):e000452 Authors: Nowotny AH, Calderon MG, de Souza PA, Aguiar AF, Léonard G, Alves BMO, Amorim CF, da Silva RA Abstract Background: Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is an important disorder in athletes that may negatively affect their performance in competitions. The literature usually recommends physiotherapy based on exercises for back pain management in athletes. Recent evidence suggests that interventions based on lumbar muscle stabilisation exercises (LMSE) and back endurance-resistance exercises (BERE) may improve back pain and function performance. However, it is still unclear which type of exercise is more effective for the treatment of CLBP in athletes. Objective: To compare the efficacy of LMSE versus BERE in athletes with CLBP. Design: The study is a 2-arm, prospectively registered, randomised controlled trial. Setting: The physical therapy clinical and biomechanics laboratory of the UNOPAR University. Participants: 32 male athletes with CLBP, age between 18 and 40 years old, recruited from the local community. Intervention: An 8-week intervention programme will be carried out with LMSE s versus BERE. Measurements: Trunk neuromuscular patterns during balance tasks (unipodal and over a ball) using electromyography and force platform parameters, pain, disability, fear and avoidance will be assessed by a blinded assessor at baseline and at follow-up after 8 weeks of intervention period. Limitations: The absence of blinding intervention and the exclusion of female athletes, seated sports and swimmers will affect the internal and external validity of the study. Conclusions: The results of this study will elucidate which of these two interventions promote better results in trunk neuromuscular pattern, back pain and function in male athletes with CLBP. PMID: 30555717 [PubMed]

Effect of Whey Protein Supplementation on Physical Performance and Body Composition in Army Initial Entry Training Soldiers.

Related Articles Effect of Whey Protein Supplementation on Physical Performance and Body Composition in Army Initial Entry Training Soldiers. Nutrients. 2018 Sep 06;10(9): Authors: McAdam JS, McGinnis KD, Beck DT, Haun CT, Romero MA, Mumford PW, Roberson PA, Young KC, Lohse KR, Lockwood CM, Roberts MD, Sefton JM Abstract We investigated the effects of whey protein (WP) supplementation on body composition and physical performance in soldiers participating in Army Initial Entry Training (IET). Sixty-nine, male United States Army soldiers volunteered for supplementation with either twice daily whey protein (WP, 77 g/day protein, ~580 kcal/day; n = 34, age = 19 ± 1 year, height = 173 ± 6 cm, weight = 73.4 ± 12.7 kg) or energy-matched carbohydrate (CHO) drinks (CHO, 127 g/day carbohydrate, ~580 kcal/day; n = 35, age = 19 ± 1 year, height = 173 ± 5 cm, weight = 72.3 ± 10.9 kg) for eight weeks during IET. Physical performance was evaluated using the Army Physical Fitness Test during weeks two and eight. Body composition was assessed using 7-site skinfold assessment during weeks one and nine. Post-testing push-up performance averaged 7 repetitions higher in the WP compared to the CHO group (F = 10.1, p < 0.001) when controlling for baseline. There was a significant decrease in fat mass at post-training (F = 4.63, p = 0.04), but no significant change in run performance (F = 3.50, p = 0.065) or fat-free mass (F = 0.70, p = 0.41). Effect sizes for fat-free mass gains were large for both the WP (Cohen's d = 0.44) and CHO (Cohen's d = 0.42) groups. WP had a large effect on fat mass (FM) loss (Cohen's d = -0.67), while CHO had a medium effect (Cohen's d = -0.40). Twice daily supplementation with WP improved push-up performance and potentiated reductions in fat mass during IET training in comparison to CHO supplementation. PMID: 30200582 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Modifiable predictors of insufficient sleep durations: A longitudinal analysis of youth in the COMPASS study.

Related Articles Modifiable predictors of insufficient sleep durations: A longitudinal analysis of youth in the COMPASS study. Prev Med. 2018 01;106:164-170 Authors: Patte KA, Qian W, Leatherdale ST Abstract The purpose of the current study was to simultaneously examine commonly proposed risk and protective factors for sleep deprivation over time among a large cohort of Ontario and Alberta secondary school students. Using 4-year linked longitudinal data from youth in years 1 through 4 (Y1[2012/2013], Y2[2013/2014], Y3[2014/2015], Y4[2015/2016]) of the COMPASS study (n=26,205), the likelihood of students meeting contemporary sleep recommendations was tested based on their self-reported substance use, bullying victimization, physical activity, and homework and screen time. Models controlled for the effect of student-reported gender, race/ethnicity, grade, school clustering, and all other predictor variables. Relative to baseline, students became less likely to meet the sleep recommendations if at follow-up they had initiated binge drinking, experienced cyber bullying victimization, or were spending more time doing homework, with other factors held constant. The likelihood of reporting sufficient sleep increased if students had begun engaging in resistance training at least three times a week. No longitudinal effect was observed when students increased their caffeine consumption (energy drinks, coffee/tea), initiated cannabis or tobacco use, experienced other forms of bullying victimization (physical, verbal, or belongings), engaged in more moderate-vigorous physical activity, or increased their screen use of any type. Few of the commonly purported modifiable risk and protective factors for youth sleep deprivation held in multinomial longitudinal analyses. Causal conclusions appear premature, with further research required to confirm the targets likely to be most effective in assisting more youth in meeting the sleep recommendations. PMID: 29109016 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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