Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Exercise Strength Training

Effect of strength training on resting metabolic rate and physical activity: age and gender comparisons.

Abstract Title: Effect of strength training on resting metabolic rate and physical activity: age and gender comparisons. Abstract Source: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Apr ;33(4):532-41. PMID: 11283427 Abstract Author(s): J T Lemmer, F M Ivey, A S Ryan, G F Martel, D E Hurlbut, J E Metter, J L Fozard, J L Fleg, B F Hurley Article Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Performance, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. Abstract: PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare age and gender effects of strength training (ST) on resting metabolic rate (RMR), energy expenditure of physical activity (EEPA), and body composition. METHODS: RMR and EEPA were measured before and after 24 wk of ST in 10 young men (20-30 yr), 9 young women (20-30 yr), 11 older men (65-75 yr), and 10 older women (65-75 yr). RESULTS: When all subjects were pooled together, absolute RMR significantly increased by 7% (5928 +/- 1225 vs 6328 +/- 1336 kJ.d-1, P<0.001). Furthermore, ST increased absolute RMR by 7% in both young (6302 +/- 1458 vs 6719 +/- 1617 kJ x d(-1), P<0.01) and older (5614 +/- 916 vs 5999 +/- 973 kJ x d(-1), P<0.05) subjects, with no significant interaction between the two age groups. In contrast, there was a significant gender x time interaction (P<0.05) for absolute RMR with men increasing RMR by 9% (6645 +/- 1073 vs 7237 +/- 1150 kJ x d(-1), P<0.001), whereas women showed no significant increase (5170 +/- 884 vs 5366 +/- 692 kJ x d(-1), P = 0.108). When RMR was adjusted for fat-free mass (FFM) using ANCOVA, with all subjects pooled together, there was still a significant increase in RMR with ST. Additionally, there was still a gender effect (P<0.05) and no significant age effect (P = NS), with only the men still showing a significant elevation in RMR. Moreover, EEPA and TEE estimated with a Tritrac accelerometer and TEE estimated by the Stanford Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall Questionnaire did not change in response to ST for any group. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, changes in absolute and relative RMR in response to ST are influenced by gender but not age. In contrast to what has been suggested previously, changes in body composition in response to ST are not due to changes in physical activity outside of training. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2001
Therapeutic Actions EXERCISE Strength Training

NCBI pubmed

Benefits of Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A CASE REPORT.

Related Articles Benefits of Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A CASE REPORT. J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev. 2018 Apr 18;: Authors: Perrotta F, Bianco A, Cioffi G, Cennamo A, Mazzarella G Abstract CLINICAL CASE: We describe the case of a 50-y-old man with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) who underwent pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). The 8-wk training program, including resistance training and aerobic exercises, was conducted 3 d/wk under physiotherapist supervision. Clinical and functional assessment was performed prior to and following the program. At the end of the training program, meaningful improvements in primary outcomes, including spirometry values and exertional parameters, were noted. DISCUSSION: Pulmonary rehabilitation may represent a valid treatment in the management of symptoms in patients with IPF. Although the current guidelines for diagnosis and management of IPF recommend the use of PR programs, patients are not routinely referred to PR centers and exercise training for these patients is not standardized. SUMMARY: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal disease characterized by the loss of lung function, which results in a severe impairment of daily activities. Prospective studies testing the effectiveness of PR programs in larger cohorts of patients are still lacking. Furthermore, a standardization of pulmonary training programs should be developed to better understand the benefit of PR. PMID: 29672359 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

An Exercise Intervention to Unravel the Mechanisms Underlying Insulin Resistance in a Cohort of Black South African Women: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial and Baseline Characteristics of Participants.

Related Articles An Exercise Intervention to Unravel the Mechanisms Underlying Insulin Resistance in a Cohort of Black South African Women: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial and Baseline Characteristics of Participants. JMIR Res Protoc. 2018 Apr 18;7(4):e75 Authors: Goedecke JH, Mendham AE, Clamp L, Nono Nankam PA, Fortuin-de Smidt MC, Phiri L, Micklesfield LK, Keswell D, Woudberg NJ, Lecour S, Alhamud A, Kaba M, Lutomia FM, van Jaarsveld PJ, de Villiers A, Kahn SE, Chorell E, Hauksson J, Olsson T Abstract BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in black African women is complex and differs from that in their white counterparts. However, earlier studies have been cross-sectional and provide little insight into the causal pathways. Exercise training is consistently used as a model to examine the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance and risk for T2D. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine the mechanisms underlying the changes in insulin sensitivity and secretion in response to a 12-week exercise intervention in obese black South African (SA) women. METHODS: A total of 45 obese (body mass index, BMI: 30-40 kg/m2) black SA women were randomized into a control (n=22) or experimental (exercise; n=23) group. The exercise group completed 12 weeks of supervised combined aerobic and resistance training (40-60 min, 4 days/week), while the control group maintained their typical physical activity patterns, and both groups were requested not to change their dietary patterns. Before and following the 12-week intervention period, insulin sensitivity and secretion (frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test) and its primary and secondary determinants were measured. Dietary intake, sleep quality and quantity, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors were measured every 4 weeks. RESULTS: The final sample included 20 exercise and 15 control participants. Baseline sociodemographics, cardiorespiratory fitness, anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, physical activity, and diet did not differ between the groups (P>.05). CONCLUSIONS: The study describes a research protocol for an exercise intervention to understand the mechanisms underlying insulin sensitivity and secretion in obese black SA women and aims to identify causal pathways underlying the high prevalence of insulin resistance and risk for T2D in black SA women, targeting specific areas for therapeutic intervention. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Pan African Clinical Trial Registry PACTR201711002789113; http://www.pactr.org/ATMWeb/ appmanager/atm/atmregistry?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=portals_app_atmregistry_portal_page_13 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6xLEFqKr0). PMID: 29669711 [PubMed]

Effect of low-intensity resistance training with heat stress on the HSP72, anabolic hormones, muscle size, and strength in elderly women.

Related Articles Effect of low-intensity resistance training with heat stress on the HSP72, anabolic hormones, muscle size, and strength in elderly women. Aging Clin Exp Res. 2017 Oct;29(5):977-984 Authors: Yoon SJ, Lee MJ, Lee HM, Lee JS Abstract BACKGROUND: Several recent studies have reported that heat stress stimulates the activation of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72), leading to an increase in muscle synthesis. Some studies suggested that low-intensity resistance training combined with heat stress could improve muscle size and strength. AIM: This study aimed to identify the effect of low-intensity resistance training with heat stress over 12 weeks on the HSP72, anabolic hormones, muscle size, and strength in elderly women. METHODS: The subjects were physically healthy women of 65-75 years, who were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a low-intensity resistance training with heating sheet group (HRT group, n = 8), a moderate-intensity resistance training (RT group, n = 6), and a heating sheet group (HEAT group, n = 7). Computed tomography scans, 1-repetition maximum (1RM), and blood samples were taken pre- and post-training. RESULTS: The HSP72 did not vary significantly between the different groups and times. The IGF-1 and 1RM had significantly increased in all three groups after the training (respectively, p < 0.05). Moreover, the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the quadriceps showed a significantly greater increase in the HRT group than in the HEAT group (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: We found that low-intensity training with heat stress stimulated the anabolic hormones of elderly women, improving their muscle strength and hypertrophy. We believe that low-intensity training with heat stress is an effective way to prevent muscle atrophy and to improve muscle strength in elderly women. PMID: 27866347 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]