Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Head-Out Water Immersion

Water immersion for adjuvant treatment of refractory ascites in patients with liver cirrhosis

Abstract Title: [Water immersion for adjuvant treatment of refractory ascites in patients with liver cirrhosis]. Abstract Source: J Mol Cell Cardiol. 2009 Jul;47(1):85-95. Epub 2009 May 3. PMID: 18158879 Abstract Author(s): María-Elena López-Ortega, Ernesto Santiago-Luna, Mario Salazar-Páramo, José Luis Montañez-Fernández, Jacqueline Osuna-Rubio, Alejandro González-Ojeda Abstract: BACKGROUND: Head-out water immersion has been proposed as an adjuvant treatment in refractory ascites and hepatorenal syndrome. We undertook this study to present the results of management of patients with refractory ascites. METHODS: We included 10 patients with diagnosis of hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites. Variables were measured in four stages: stage I (basal); II (at the end of water immersion); III (72 h after water immersion); IV (1 week after water immersion concludes). Clinical and laboratory variables were measured and included general exams and renal function tests. Friedman test was used for statistics to establish differences between variables at the end of stage IV. We considered statistical significance when p<0.05. RESULTS: Median age was 53.8 years, corresponding to seven men and three women with a Child's classification of B or C. Statistically significant variables were weight (p=0.02) and abdominal circumference (p=0.003), as a result of an increased urine output (p=0.03) and glomerular filtration rate (p<0.002). Renal plasma rate increased until stage III, returning to basal level in stage IV. Serum potassium levels decreased but the difference was marginal (p=0.052). During follow-up, two patients died as a consequence of liver insufficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Head-out water immersion showed a decrease in weight and abdominal circumference, which means reduction of ascites. There was a transitory improvement in renal function. No collateral events were reported. Water immersion could be proposed as an adjuvant treatment in patients with refractory ascites and liver cirrhosis. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2009
Therapeutic Actions Head-Out Water Immersion

NCBI pubmed

Central chemosensitivity is augmented during two hours of thermoneutral head out water immersion in healthy men and women.

Related Articles Central chemosensitivity is augmented during two hours of thermoneutral head out water immersion in healthy men and women. Exp Physiol. 2018 Mar 12;: Authors: Sackett JR, Schlader ZJ, O'Leary MC, Chapman CL, Johnson BD Abstract NEW FINDINGS: What is the central question of the study? Is central chemosensitivity blunted during thermoneutral head out water immersion in healthy humans? What is the main finding and its importance? Central chemosensitivity is augmented during thermoneutral head out water immersion in healthy men and women. Thus, we suggest that the central chemoreceptors do not contribute CO2 retention during head out water immersion. ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) retention occurs during water immersion. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that central chemosensitivity to hypercapnia is blunted during two hours of thermoneutral head out water immersion (HOWI) in healthy young adults. Twenty-six participants (age: 22 ± 2 years, BMI: 24 ± 3 kg/m2 , 14 women) participated in two experimental visits: a HOWI visit (HOWI) and a dry time-control visit (Control). Central chemosensitivity was assessed via a rebreathing test at baseline, 10 minutes, 60 minutes, 90 minutes, 120 minutes, and post HOWI and Control. End tidal CO2 tension (PETCO2 ), minute ventilation, blood pressure, and heart rate were recorded continuously. PETCO2 increased from baseline throughout HOWI (peak increase at 120 minutes: 2 ± 2 mmHg; p < 0.001) and the change in PETCO2 was greater throughout HOWI than Control (p < 0.001). The change in minute and alveolar ventilation was not different across time (p ≥ 0.173) or between conditions (p ≥ 0.052). Central chemosensitivity was greater than baseline throughout HOWI (peak increase: 0.74 ± 1.01 L/min/mmHg at 120 minutes; p < 0.001) and the change in central chemosensitivity was greater throughout HOWI than Control (p ≤ 0.006). We also divided the cohort into tertiles based on baseline central chemosensitivity (i.e., Low, Intermediate, and High) and compared Low vs. High during HOWI. Low demonstrated an increase in PETCO2 starting at 10 minutes (2 ± 3 mmHg; p < 0.001), whereas High didn't exhibit an increase in PETCO2 until 60 minutes (2 ± 2 mmHg; p = 0.018). These data indicate that CO2 retention occurs throughout HOWI despite augmented central chemosensitivity and that having a high baseline central chemosensitivity might delay the onset of CO2 retention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29527752 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]