Therapeutic Actions Hypnosis

NCBI pubmed

Identification of metabolites of Helicid in vivo using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

Related Articles Identification of metabolites of Helicid in vivo using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Biomed Chromatogr. 2018 Apr 18;:e4263 Authors: Diao X, Liao M, Cheng X, Liang C, Sun Y, Zhang X, Zhang L Abstract Helicid is an active natural aromatic phenolic glycoside ingredient originating from well-known traditional Chinese herb medicine and has the significant effects of sedative hypnosis, anti-inflammatory analgesia and antidepressant. In this study, we analyzed the potential metabolites of Helicid in rats by multiple mass defect filter (MMDF)and dynamic background subtraction (DBS)in ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS). Moreover, we used a novel data processing method 'key product ions (KPIs)' to rapidly detect and identifymetabolites as an assistant tool. MetabolitePilotTM 2.0 software and PeakViewTM 2.2 software were used for analyzing metabolites. Twenty metabolites of Helicid (including 15 phase I metabolites and 5 phase II metabolites) were detected by comparing with the blank samples, respectively. Thebiotransformationroute of Helicid was identified as demethylation, oxidation, dehydroxylation, hydrogenation, decarbonylation,glucuronide conjugation and methylation.This is the first study of simultaneously detecting and identifying Helicid metabolism in rats by employing UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS technology. This experiment not only proposed a method for rapidly detecting and identifying metabolites, but also provided useful information for further study of the pharmacology and mechanism of Helicid in vivo. Furthermore, it provided an effective method for the analysis of other aromatic phenolic glycosides metabolic components in vivo. PMID: 29669394 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Streams of Unconsciousness II: Hypnosis Reflected in the Styx.

Related Articles Streams of Unconsciousness II: Hypnosis Reflected in the Styx. Anesthesiology. 2018 May;128(5):991 Authors: PMID: 29664781 [PubMed - in process]

[Self-hypnosis training for in-hospital chronic pain patients : A retrolective observational study].

Related Articles [Self-hypnosis training for in-hospital chronic pain patients : A retrolective observational study]. Schmerz. 2018 Apr 16;: Authors: Keil PC, Lindenberg N, Lassen CL, Graf BM, Meier J, Wiese CH Abstract BACKGROUND: Hypnosis is probably one of the oldest therapies known to man. In the last decades modern hypnosis has mainly been used by psychotherapists; however, hypnosis is becoming increasingly more important as a therapeutic method in medicine. Hypnosis can be used for a variety of medical indications. In the literature there is much evidence for the effectiveness of hypnosis. The aim of the present investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of hypnosis in inpatient treatment of chronic pain patients and to present a self-hypnosis program, which can be easily integrated into pain therapy. METHODS: From October 2012 to April 2013 all inpatient chronic pain patients were included (group 1: non-hypnosis group, group 2: hypnosis group). Concerning group 2 a standardized protocol for hypnotherapy was integrated in addition to the standardized pain management program. The main goal of hypnotherapy was to integrate a self-hypnosis training so that further implementation in a domestic setting could be guaranteed. By means of standardized test procedures, e. g. Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Pain Disability Index (PDI), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) and Numerical Rating Scales (NRS) for pain and general well-being, data were evaluated before and after the pain therapy. RESULTS: The prestandardized and poststandardized test procedures of 30 chronic pain patients were evaluated (17 patients without hypnosis, 13 patients with hypnosis). The main diagnosis according to ICD-10 was "chronic pain disorder" (F45.41) with a MPSS stage III in all patients. The PDI was significantly improved in the hypnosis group (p = 0.019). The other items all showed a trend towards improvement in the hypnosis group (exception GAD-7) but without statistical significance (p > 0.05). DISCUSSION: In a small patient collective, the present investigation was able to show that the integration of modern hypnotherapy into the treatment of chronic pain patients in an inpatient setting can be another useful therapeutic aspect. In particular, the instructions for learning independently seem to be useful due to the limited in-patient time. More research needs to be carried out to support our initial findings. PMID: 29663083 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Use, applicability and reliability of depth of hypnosis monitors in children - a survey among members of the European Society for Paediatric Anaesthesiology.

Related Articles Use, applicability and reliability of depth of hypnosis monitors in children - a survey among members of the European Society for Paediatric Anaesthesiology. BMC Anesthesiol. 2018 Apr 16;18(1):40 Authors: Cheung YM, Scoones G, Stolker RJ, Weber F Abstract BACKGROUND: To assess the thoughts of practicing anaesthesiologists about the use of depth of hypnosis monitors in children. METHODS: Members of the European Society for Paediatric Anaesthesiology were invited to participate in an online survey about their thoughts regarding the use, applicability and reliability of hypnosis monitoring in children. RESULTS: The survey achieved a response rate of 30% (N = 168). A total of 138 completed surveys were included for further analysis. Sixty-eight respondents used hypnosis monitoring in children (Users) and 70 did not (Non-users). Sixty-five percent of the Users reported prevention of intra-operative awareness as their main reason to apply hypnosis monitoring. Among the Non-users, the most frequently given reason (43%) not to use hypnosis monitoring in children was the perceived lack or reliability of the devices in children. Hypnosis monitoring is used with a higher frequency during propofol anaesthesia than during inhalation anaesthesia. Hypnosis monitoring is furthermore used more frequently in children > 4 years than in younger children. An ideal hypnosis monitor should be reliable for all age groups and any (combination of) anaesthetic drug. We found no agreement in the interpretation of monitor index values and subsequent anaesthetic interventions following from it. CONCLUSIONS: Prevention of intraoperative awareness appears to be the most important reason to use hypnosis monitoring in children. The perceived lack of reliability of hypnosis monitoring in children is the most important reasons not to use it. No consensus currently exists on how to adjust anaesthesia according to hypnosis monitor index values in children. PMID: 29661242 [PubMed - in process]