Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Laser Treatment

Optimal Laser Phototherapy Parameters for Pain Relief.

Abstract Title: Optimal Laser Phototherapy Parameters for Pain Relief. Abstract Source: Photomed Laser Surg. 2018 Mar 27. Epub 2018 Mar 27. PMID: 29583080 Abstract Author(s): Rohit J Kate, Sarah Rubatt, Chukuka S Enwemeka, Wendy E Huddleston Article Affiliation: Rohit J Kate Abstract: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Studies on laser phototherapy for pain relief have used parameters that vary widely and have reported varying outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal parameter ranges of laser phototherapy for pain relief by analyzing data aggregated from existing primary literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Original studies were gathered from available sources and were screened to meet the pre-established inclusion criteria. The included articles were then subjected to meta-analysis using Cohen's d statistic for determining treatment effect size. From these studies, ranges of the reported parameters that always resulted into large effect sizes were determined. These optimal ranges were evaluated for their accuracy using leave-one-article-out cross-validation procedure. RESULTS: A total of 96 articles met the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis and yielded 232 effect sizes. The average effect size was highly significant: d = +1.36 (confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.04-1.68). Among all the parameters, total energy was found to have the greatest effect on pain relief and had the most prominent optimal ranges of 120-162 and 15.36-20.16 J, which always resulted in large effect sizes. The cross-validation accuracy of the optimal ranges for total energy was 68.57% (95% CI = 53.19-83.97). Fewer and less-prominent optimal ranges were obtained for the energy density and duration parameters. None of the remaining parameters was found to be independently related to pain relief outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of meta-analysis indicate that laser phototherapy is highly effective for pain relief. Based on the analysis of parameters, total energy can be optimized to yield the largest effect on pain relief. Article Published Date : Mar 26, 2018

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and pain management with low-level laser therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

Abstract Title: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and pain management with low-level laser therapy: a randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol. 2014 May ;117(5):590-4. Epub 2014 Feb 6. PMID: 24725989 Abstract Author(s): Margit Albrektson, Lennart Hedström, Håkan Bergh Article Affiliation: Margit Albrektson Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has an analgesic effect in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). STUDY DESIGN: A randomized single-blinded placebo-controlled trial was conducted with LLLT (wavelength, 809 nm; power, 60 mW; pulse frequency, 1800 Hz; duration, 80 seconds per treatment; dose, 6.3 J/cm(2)) in 40 patients with RAS. The intervention group was treated with LLLT on 3 occasions, with a 1-day interval. The control group was treated similarly, without any laser power. Pain perception (visual analog scale [VAS] rating) and patients' experience of eating, drinking, and brushing teeth was registered. RESULTS: VAS rating decreased (day 0 until day 2) from 84.7 to 31.5 (LLLT) and from 81.7 to 76.1 (placebo) (P<.0001). LLLT also relieved the difficulty of drinking, eating, and brushing teeth. CONCLUSIONS: LLLT reduced the pain and the inconvenience of eating, drinking, and brushing teeth for patients with RAS, compared with placebo. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2014

Complementary treatment with oral pidotimod plus vitamin C after laser vaporization for female genital warts: a prospective study. 📎

Abstract Title: Complementary treatment with oral pidotimod plus vitamin C after laser vaporization for female genital warts: a prospective study. Abstract Source: J Med Life. 2010 Jul-Sep;3(3):286-8. PMID: 20945819 Abstract Author(s): S Zervoudis, G Iatrakis, P Peitsidis, A Peitsidou, L Papandonopolos, M K Nikolopoulou, L Papadopoulos, R Vladareanu Article Affiliation: Technol. Educational Institution of Athens, Athens, Greece. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: This is a prospective study to assess a complementary treatment for genital warts after laser vaporization. 62 patients were enrolled in two randomized groups: Al: laser vaporization alone. A2: laser vaporization, followed with Pidotimod plus vitamin C for 2 1/2 months. The latter treatment shortened the time of warts remission and marginally decreased the rate of the warts' recurrence: 81% versus 67% (N.S.). Despite the non-significant difference, this complementary treatment seems to have some efficiency. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2010

The use of low-level light for hair growth: part I.

Abstract Title: The use of low-level light for hair growth: part I. Abstract Source: J Cosmet Laser Ther. 2009 Jun;11(2):110-7. PMID: 19466643 Abstract Author(s): Marc R Avram, Nicole E Rogers Article Affiliation: Cornell Department of Dermatology, New York, NY, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a new therapy for the treatment of hair loss. It has received enormous media attention and tremendous marketing budgets from companies that sell the devices, but no independent, peer-reviewed studies have demonstrated its efficacy in this application. Here we investigate the efficacy of LLLT in enhancing hair growth. METHODS: A total of seven patients were exposed to LLLT twice weekly for 20 minutes each time over a period of 3-6 months. Five patients were treated for a total of 3 months and two were treated for 6 months. Videomicroscopic images were taken at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months, and analyzed for changes in vellus hair counts, terminal hair counts, and shaft diameter. Both videomicroscopic and global images underwent blinded review for evidence of subjective improvement. Patients also answered questionnaires assessing hair growth throughout the study. Neither patients nor physicians conducting the study received any financial compensation. RESULTS: The results indicate that on average patients had a decrease in the number of vellus hairs, an increase in the number of terminal hairs, and an increase in shaft diameter. However, paired i-testing indicated that none of these changes was statistically significant. Also, blinded evaluation of global images did not support an improvement in hair density or caliber. CONCLUSIONS: LLLT may be a promising treatment option for patients who do not respond to either finasteride or minoxidil, and who do not want to undergo hair transplantation. This technology appears to work better for some people than for others. Factors predicting who will most benefit are yet to be determined. Larger, longer-term placebo-controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings, and demonstrate statistical significance, or refute them altogether. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2009

Low-intensity laser therapy is an effective treatment for recurrent herpes simplex infection. Results from a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. 📎

Abstract Title: Low-intensity laser therapy is an effective treatment for recurrent herpes simplex infection. Results from a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Abstract Source: Glia. 2009 Mar;57(4):402-13. PMID: 10469307 Abstract Author(s): A Schindl, R Neumann Abstract: Recurrent infection with herpes simplex virus is a common disease. Recently, alternative therapies have been introduced. Among those, low-intensity laser therapy mainly used for the acceleration of wound healing and in pain therapy has previously been shown to be of benefit in herpes zoster infections. In this study we evaluated the influence of low-intensity laser therapy (wavelength 690 nm, intensity: 80 mW per cm2, dose: 48 J per cm2) in 50 patients with recurrent perioral herpes simplex infection (at least once per month for more than 6 mo) in a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial design. Patients in the laser group received daily irradiations for 2 wk, whereas patients in the placebo group were sham-irradiated. After completion of the laser/sham treatment, patients were asked to return to the Department of Dermatology, University of Vienna Medical School at the time of recurrence. All except two patients completed the study and were monitored for 52 wk. The median recurrence-free interval in the laser-treated group was 37.5 wk (range: 2-52 wk) and in the placebo group 3 wk (range: 1-20 wk). This difference was found to be statistically significant (p<0.0001; Wilcoxon's Rank Sum Test). In conclusion, we demonstrated that a total of 10 irradiations with low-intensity laser therapy significantly lowers the incidence of local recurrence of herpes simplex infection. Since this athermic phototherapeutic modality represents a safe, noninvasive treatment, it might be considered as an alternative to established therapeutic regimens in this indication. Article Published Date : Mar 01, 2009

Phototherapy in peripheral nerve regeneration: From basic science to clinical study. 📎

Abstract Title: Phototherapy in peripheral nerve regeneration: From basic science to clinical study. Abstract Source: Neurosurg Focus. 2009 Feb;26(2):E8. PMID: 19199510 Abstract Author(s): Shimon Rochkind Article Affiliation: Division of Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction, Department of Neurosurgery, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECT: This review summarizes the continuous study of low-power laser radiation treatment of a severely injured peripheral nerve. Laser phototherapy was applied as a supportive factor for accelerating and enhancing axonal growth and regeneration after injury or a reconstructive peripheral nerve procedure. In nerve cell cultures, laser phototherapy was used to stimulate activation of nerve cells. METHODS: Low-power laser radiation was used for treatment of peripheral nerve injury using a rat sciatic nerve model after crush injury, neurorrhaphy, or neurotube reconstruction. Nerve cell growth and axonal sprouting were investigated using laser phototherapy on embryonic rat brain cultures. The outcome in animal studies facilitated a clinical double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study that measured the effectiveness of 780-nm laser phototherapy on patients suffering from incomplete peripheral nerve injuries for 6 months to several years. RESULTS: Animal studies showed that laser phototherapy has an immediate protective effect, maintains functional activity of the injured nerve, decreases scar tissue formation at the injury site, decreases degeneration in corresponding motor neurons of the spinal cord, and significantly increases axonal growth and myelinization. In cell cultures, laser irradiation accelerates migration, nerve cell growth, and fiber sprouting. A pilot clinical double-blind, placebocontrolled, randomized study showed that in patients with incomplete long-term peripheral nerve injury, 780-nm laser radiation can progressively improve peripheral nerve function, which leads to significant functional recovery. CONCLUSIONS: Using 780-nm laser phototherapy accelerates and enhances axonal growth and regeneration after injury or a reconstructive peripheral nerve procedure. Laser activation of nerve cells, their growth, and axonal sprouting can be considered as potential treatment of neuronal injury. Animal and clinical studies show the promoting action of phototherapy on peripheral nerve regeneration, making it possible to suggest that the time for broader clinical trials has arrived. Article Published Date : Feb 01, 2009

Chapter 25: Phototherapy in peripheral nerve injury: effects on muscle preservation and nerve regeneration.

Abstract Title: Chapter 25: Phototherapy in peripheral nerve injury: effects on muscle preservation and nerve regeneration. Abstract Source: Int Rev Neurobiol. 2009;87:445-64. PMID: 19682654 Abstract Author(s): Shimon Rochkind, Stefano Geuna, Asher Shainberg Article Affiliation: Division of Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction, Department of Neurosurgery, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Abstract: Posttraumatic nerve repair and prevention of muscle atrophy represent a major challenge of restorative medicine. Considerable interest exists in the potential therapeutic value of laser phototherapy for restoring or temporarily preventing denervated muscle atrophy as well as enhancing regeneration of severely injured peripheral nerves. Low-power laser irradiation (laser phototherapy) was applied for treatment of rat denervated muscle in order to estimate biochemical transformation on cellular and tissue levels, as well as on rat sciatic nerve model after crush injury, direct or side-to-end anastomosis, and neurotube reconstruction. Nerve cells' growth and axonal sprouting were investigated in embryonic rat brain cultures. The animal outcome allowed clinical double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study that measured the effectiveness of 780-nm laser phototherapy on patients suffering from incomplete peripheral nerve injuries for 6 months up to several years. In denervated muscles, animal study suggests that the function of denervated muscles can be partially preserved by temporary prevention of denervation-induced biochemical changes. The function of denervated muscles can be restored, not completely but to a very substantial degree, by laser treatment initiated at the earliest possible stage post injury. In peripheral nerve injury, laser phototherapy has an immediate protective effect. It maintains functional activity of the injured nerve for a long period, decreases scar tissue formation at the injury site, decreases degeneration in corresponding motor neurons of the spinal cord, and significantly increases axonal growth and myelinization. In cell cultures, laser irradiation accelerates migration, nerve cell growth, and fiber sprouting. In a pilot, clinical, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study in patients with incomplete long-term peripheral nerve injury, 780-nm laser irradiation can progressively improve peripheral nerve function, which leads to significant functional recovery. A 780-nm laser phototherapy temporarily preserves the function of a denervated muscle, and accelerates and enhances axonal growth and regeneration after peripheral nerve injury or reconstructive procedures. Laser activation of nerve cells, their growth, and axonal sprouting can be considered as potential treatment for neural injury. Animal and clinical studies show the promoting action of phototherapy on peripheral nerve regeneration, which makes it possible to suggest that the time for broader clinical trials has come. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2009

Efficacy of 780-nm laser phototherapy on peripheral nerve regeneration after neurotube reconstruction procedure (double-blind randomized study).

Abstract Title: Efficacy of 780-nm laser phototherapy on peripheral nerve regeneration after neurotube reconstruction procedure (double-blind randomized study). Abstract Source: Photomed Laser Surg. 2007 Jun;25(3):137-43. PMID: 17603852 Abstract Author(s): Shimon Rochkind, Leonor Leider-Trejo, Moshe Nissan, Merav H Shamir, Oleg Kharenko, Malvina Alon Article Affiliation: Division of Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: This pilot double-blind randomized study evaluated the efficacy of 780-nm laser phototherapy on the acceleration of axonal growth and regeneration after peripheral nerve reconstruction by polyglycolic acid (PGA) neurotube. BACKGROUND DATA: The use of a guiding tube for the reconstruction of segmental loss of injured peripheral nerve has some advantages over the regular nerve grafting procedure. Experimental studies have shown that laser phototherapy is effective in influencing nerve regeneration. METHODS: The right sciatic nerve was transected, and a 0.5-cm nerve segment was removed in 20 rats. A neurotube was placed between the proximal and the distal parts of the nerve for reconnection of nerve defect. Ten of 20 rats received post-operative, transcutaneous, 200-mW, 780-nm laser irradiation for 14 consecutive days to the corresponding segments of the spinal cord (15 min) and to the reconstructed nerve (15 min). RESULTS: At 3 months after surgery, positive somato-sensory evoked responses were found in 70% of the irradiated rats (p = 0.015), compared to 30% of the non-irradiated rats. The Sciatic Functional Index in the irradiated group was higher than in the non-irradiated group (p<0.05). Morphologically, the nerves were completely reconnected in both groups, but the laser-treated group showed an increased total number of myelinated axons. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that postoperative 780-nm laser phototherapy enhances the regenerative process of the peripheral nerve after reconnection of the nerve defect using a PGA neurotube. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2007

low-level laser therapy applied transcranially to mice following traumatic brain injury significantly reduces long-term neurological deficits.

Abstract Title: low-level laser therapy applied transcranially to mice following traumatic brain injury significantly reduces long-term neurological deficits. Abstract Source: J Neurotrauma. 2007 Apr;24(4):651-6. PMID: 17439348 Abstract Author(s): Amir Oron, Uri Oron, Jackson Streeter, Luis de Taboada, Alexander Alexandrovich, Victoria Trembovler, Esther Shohami Article Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zerifin, Israel. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been evaluated in this study as a potential therapy for traumatic brain injury (TBI). LLLT has been found to modulate various biological processes. Following TBI in mice, we assessed the hypothesis that LLLT might have a beneficial effect on their neurobehavioral and histological outcome. TBI was induced by a weight-drop device, and motor function was assessed 1 h post-trauma using a neurological severity score (NSS). Mice were then divided into three groups of eight mice each: one control group that received a sham LLLT procedure and was not irradiated; and two groups that received LLLT at two different doses (10 and 20 mW/cm(2) ) transcranially. An 808-nm Ga-As diode laser was employed transcranially 4 h post-trauma to illuminate the entire cortex of the brain. Motor function was assessed up to 4 weeks, and lesion volume was measured. There were no significant changes in NSS at 24 and 48 h between the laser-treated and non-treated mice. Yet, from 5 days and up to 28 days, the NSS of the laser-treated mice were significantly lower (p<0.05) than the traumatized control mice that were not treated with the laser. The lesion volume of the laser treated mice was significantly lower (1.4%) than the non-treated group (12.1%). Our data suggest that a non-invasive transcranial application of LLLT given 4 h following TBI provides a significant long-term functional neurological benefit. Further confirmatory trials are warranted. Article Published Date : Apr 01, 2007

Low-level laser therapy applied transcranially to rats after induction of stroke significantly reduces long-term neurological deficits. 📎

Abstract Title: Low-level laser therapy applied transcranially to rats after induction of stroke significantly reduces long-term neurological deficits. Abstract Source: Stroke. 2006 Oct;37(10):2620-4. Epub 2006 Aug 31. PMID: 16946145 Abstract Author(s): Amir Oron, Uri Oron, Jieli Chen, Anda Eilam, Chunling Zhang, Menachem Sadeh, Yair Lampl, Jackson Streeter, Luis DeTaboada, Michael Chopp Article Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zerifin 70300, Israel. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) modulates various biological processes. In the present study, we assessed the hypothesis that LLLT after induction of stroke may have a beneficial effect on ischemic brain tissue. METHODS: Two sets of experiments were performed. Stroke was induced in rats by (1) permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery through a craniotomy or (2) insertion of a filament. After induction of stroke, a battery of neurological and functional tests (neurological score, adhesive removal) was performed. Four and 24 hours poststroke, a Ga-As diode laser was used transcranially to illuminate the hemisphere contralateral to the stroke at a power density of 7.5 mW/cm2. RESULTS: In both models of stroke, LLLT significantly reduced neurological deficits when applied 24 hours poststroke. Application of the laser at 4 hours poststroke did not affect the neurological outcome of the stroke-induced rats as compared with controls. There was no statistically significant difference in the stroke lesion area between control and laser-irradiated rats. The number of newly formed neuronal cells, assessed by double immunoreactivity to bromodeoxyuridine and tubulin isotype III as well as migrating cells (doublecortin immunoactivity), was significantly elevated in the subventricular zone of the hemisphere ipsilateral to the induction of stroke when treated by LLLT. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that a noninvasive intervention of LLLT issued 24 hours after acute stroke may provide a significant functional benefit with an underlying mechanism possibly being induction of neurogenesis. Article Published Date : Oct 01, 2006

Treatment of molluscum contagiosum with the pulsed dye laser over a 28-month period.

Abstract Title: Treatment of molluscum contagiosum with the pulsed dye laser over a 28-month period. Abstract Source: Cutis. 2003 May;71(5):414-6. PMID: 12769411 Abstract Author(s): John G Hancox, Jeffrey Jackson, Sean McCagh Abstract: Although benign, molluscum contagiosum causes cosmetic concern, infection, or transmission to close contacts. Treating patients with multiple lesions, especially children, may be difficult. Complications of treatment include infection, scarring, and limited posttreatment activity. The pulsed dye laser (PDL) has proven safe and effective for the treatment of many skin lesions, but little data exist for its role in the treatment of molluscum contagiosum. The purpose of this study is to describe the use, over a 28-month period, of the 585-nm PDL for the treatment of molluscum contagiosum. The benefits of this treatment are discussed. The charts of 43 patients receiving PDL treatment for molluscum contagiosum between November 1997 and March 2000 were reviewed. Number and location of lesions at initial presentation and on follow-up visits were recorded. Attempts were made to contact patients who were lost to follow-up. All of the approximately 1250 lesions treated resolved, and 35% of patients (n = 15) had no new lesions after 2 treatments. No complications were associated with the procedure. The PDL is a reasonable alternative to traditional treatment modalities for molluscum contagiosum. Benefits to the patient may include prompt response, fewer treatments, and minimal morbidity. Article Published Date : May 01, 2003
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