Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Light Therapy - Colored

Green tea and red light--a powerful duo in skin rejuvenation.

Abstract Title: Green tea and red light--a powerful duo in skin rejuvenation. Abstract Source: Photomed Laser Surg. 2009 Dec;27(6):969-71. PMID: 19817517 Abstract Author(s): Andrei P Sommer, Dan Zhu Article Affiliation: Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Juvenile skin has been the subject of intense research efforts since ancient times. This article reports on synergistic complementarities in the biological actions of green tea and red light, which inspired the design of a green tea-assisted facial rejuvenation program. BACKGROUND DATA: The approach is based on previous laboratory experiments providing insight into a mechanism by which visible light interacts with cells and their microenvironment. METHODS: After 2 months of extreme oxidative stress, green tea-filled cotton pads were placed once per day for 20 minutes onto the skin before treatment with an array of light-emitting diodes (central wavelength 670 nm, dermal dose 4 J/cm2). RESULTS: Rejuvenated skin, reduced wrinkle levels, and juvenile complexion, previously realized in 10 months of light treatment alone were realized in 1 month. CONCLUSION: The accelerated skin rejuvenation based on the interplay of the physicochemical and biological effects of light with the reactive oxygen species scavenging capacity of green tea extends the action spectrum of phototherapy. The duo opens the gate to a multitude of possible biomedical light applications and cosmetic formulas, including reversal of topical deterioration related to excess reactive oxygen species, such as graying of hair. Article Published Date : Dec 01, 2009

A prospective, randomized, open and comparative study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of blue light treatment versus a topical benzoyl peroxide 5% formulation in patients with acne grade II and III. 📎

Abstract Title: [A prospective, randomized, open and comparative study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of blue light treatment versus a topical benzoyl peroxide 5% formulation in patients with acne grade II and III]. Abstract Source: An Bras Dermatol. 2009 Oct;84(5):463-8. PMID: 20098847 Abstract Author(s): Lúcia H F de Arruda, Vanessa Kodani, Antonio Bastos Filho, Carla Bassanezi Mazzaro Abstract: BACKGROUND: Many acne patients improve after exposure to sunlight and there are many reports about the efficacy of blue light phototherapy on acne lesions. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of blue light treatment versus topical benzoyl peroxide 5% formulation in patients with acne grades II and III. METHODS: Sixty volunteers with facial acne were included and evaluated in 5 visits: the first one for screening, another 3 held on days 7, 14 and 28 of treatment, and the last one after 14 days of the end of treatment. Thirty of them were irradiated with Blue Light (8 times, twice a week) and the other thirty were treated with topical Benzoyl Peroxide 5% formulation, auto-applied twice a day, every day. We assessed the severity of acne by counting the lesions and analyzing the photographs. RESULTS: The improvement achieved by the blue light was the same as the one with benzoyl peroxide, regardless of the type of lesion (p 0.05). Otherwise, the side effects were less frequent in the group treated with blue light. CONCLUSIONS: Blue light irradiation was as effective as benzoyl peroxide in acne treatment grades II and III but there were fewer side effects. Article Published Date : Oct 01, 2009

Phototherapy with blue (415 nm) and red (660 nm) light in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

Abstract Title: Phototherapy with blue (415 nm) and red (660 nm) light in the treatment of acne vulgaris. Abstract Source: Br J Dermatol. 2000 May;142(5):973-8. PMID: 10809858 Abstract Author(s): P Papageorgiou, A Katsambas, A Chu Abstract: In this study we have evaluated the use of blue light (peak at 415 nm) and a mixed blue and red light (peaks at 415 and 660 nm) in the treatment of acne vulgaris. One hundred and seven patients with mild to moderate acne vulgaris were randomized into four treatment groups: blue light, mixed blue and red light, cool white light and 5% benzoyl peroxide cream. Subjects in the phototherapy groups used portable light sources and irradiation was carried out daily for 15 min. Comparative assessment between the three light sources was made in an observer-blinded fashion, but this could not be achieved for the use of benzoyl peroxide. Assessments were performed every 4 weeks. After 12 weeks of active treatment a mean improvement of 76% (95% confidence interval 66-87) in inflammatory lesions was achieved by the combined blue-red light phototherapy; this was significantly superior to that achieved by blue light (at weeks 4 and 8 but not week 12), benzoyl peroxide (at weeks 8 and 12) or white light (at each assessment). The final mean improvement in comedones by using blue-red light was 58% (95% confidence interval 45-71), again better than that achieved by the other active treatments used, although the differences did not reach significant levels. We have found that phototherapy with mixed blue-red light, probably by combining antibacterial and anti-inflammatory action, is an effective means of treating acne vulgaris of mild to moderate severity, with no significant short-term adverse effects. Article Published Date : May 01, 2000
Therapeutic Actions Light Therapy - Colored

NCBI pubmed

DNA Staining Method Based on Formazan Precipitation Induced by Blue Light Exposure.

Related Articles DNA Staining Method Based on Formazan Precipitation Induced by Blue Light Exposure. J Vis Exp. 2018 01 28;(131): Authors: Paredes AJ, Alfaro-Valdés HM, Wilson CAM Abstract DNA staining methods are very important for biomedical research. We designed a simple method that allows DNA visualization to the naked eye by the formation of a colored precipitate. It works by soaking the acrylamide or agarose DNA gel in a solution of 1x (equivalent to 2.0 µM) SYBR Green I (SG I) and 0.20 mM nitro blue tetrazolium that produces a purple precipitate of formazan when exposed to sunlight or specifically blue light. Also, DNA recovery tests were performed using an ampicillin resistant plasmid in an agarose gel stained with our method. A larger number of colonies was obtained with our method than with traditional staining using SG I with ultraviolet illumination. The described method is fast, specific, and non-toxic for DNA detection, allowing visualization of biomolecules to the "naked eye" without a transilluminator, and is inexpensive and appropriate for field use. For these reasons, our new DNA staining method has potential benefits to both research and industry. PMID: 29443080 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]