Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Maggot therapy

Maggot therapy in wound management. 📎

Abstract Title: [Maggot therapy in wound management]. Abstract Source: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Sep 24;129(18):1864-7. PMID: 19844278 Abstract Author(s): Birgit Margrethe Falch, Louis de Weerd, Arnfinn Sundsfjord Article Affiliation: Det medisinske fakultet, Universitetet i Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Maggots' ability to prevent infections and promote wound healing has been known since the 19th century. Increasing problems with treatment-resistant wounds and antibiotic-resistant bacteria has aroused interest in maggot therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Literature on maggot therapy - identified through a non-systematic search of Pubmed - was reviewed. RESULTS: Maggot therapy is the medical use of disinfected fly larvae (usually the larvae of Lucilia sericata) in treatment of wounds resistant to conventional treatment. The maggots work through three mechanisms of action; they debride wounds by dissolving necrotic tissue, clean wounds by killing bacteria and promote wound healing. The larvae have a broad antibacterial action against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including MRSA. Maggot therapy is used to debride a number of complicated skin and soft tissue wounds - e.g.. pressure ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, neurovascular ulcers, traumatic wounds and burns - but also as a treatment for osteomyelitis. Large controlled clinical trials have not been performed. Maggot therapy has not been associated with serious side effects. INTERPRETATION: Maggot therapy seems to be an effective and environmentally friendly treatment of complicated necrotic wounds that are resistant to conventional treatment. Maggot therapy should also be considered in earlier stages of treatment. Article Published Date : Sep 24, 2009

Clinical and microbiological efficacy of MDT in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

Abstract Title: Clinical and microbiological efficacy of MDT in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Abstract Source: J Wound Care. 2007 Oct;16(9):379-83. PMID: 17987750 Abstract Author(s): T I Tantawi, Y M Gohar, M M Kotb, F M Beshara, M M El-Naggar Article Affiliation: Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical and microbiological efficacy of maggot debridement therapy (MDT) in the management of diabetic foot ulcers unresponsive to conventional treatment and surgical intervention. METHOD: Consecutive diabetic patients with foot wounds presenting at the vascular surgery unit and the diabetic foot unit of Alexandria Main University Hospital were selected for MDT. Lucilia sericata medicinal maggots were applied to the ulcers for three days per week. Changes in the percentage of necrotic tissue and ulcer surface area were recorded each week over the 12-week follow-up period. Semiquantitative swab technique was used to determine the bacterial load before and after MDT. RESULTS: The sample comprised 10 patients with 13 diabetic foot ulcers. The mean baseline ulcer surface area was 23.5cm2 (range 1.3-63.1), and the mean percentage of necrotic tissue was 74.9% (range 29.9-100). Complete debridement was achieved in all ulcers in a mean of 1.9 weeks (range 1-4). Five ulcers (38.5%) were completely debrided with one three-day MDT cycle. The mean reduction in ulcer size was significant at 90.2%, and this occurred in a mean of 8.1 weeks (range 2-12). The mean weekly reduction in ulcer size was 16.1% (range 8.3-50). Full wound healing occurred in 11 ulcers (84.6%) within a mean of 7.3 weeks (range 2-10). The bacterial load of all ulcers reduced sharply after the first MDT cycle to below the 10(5) threshold, which facilitates healing. CONCLUSION: The results highlight the potential benefits of MDT in diabetic wound care in developing countries. MDT was proved to be a rapid, simple and efficient method of treating these ulcers. Article Published Date : Oct 01, 2007

Maggot therapy for treating diabetic foot ulcers unresponsive to conventional therapy. 📎

Abstract Title: Maggot therapy for treating diabetic foot ulcers unresponsive to conventional therapy. Abstract Source: Diabetes Care. 2003 Feb;26(2):446-51. PMID: 12547878 Abstract Author(s): Ronald A Sherman Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of maggot therapy for treating foot and leg ulcers in diabetic patients failing conventional therapy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Retrospective comparison of changes in necrotic and total surface area of chronic wounds treated with either maggot therapy or standard (control) surgical or nonsurgical therapy. RESULTS: In this cohort of 18 patients with 20 nonhealing ulcers, six wounds were treated with conventional therapy, six with maggot therapy, and eight with conventional therapy first, then maggot therapy. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated no significant change in necrotic tissue, except when factoring for treatment (F [1.7, 34] = 5.27, P = 0.013). During the first 14 days of conventional therapy, there was no significant debridement of necrotic tissue; during the same period with maggot therapy, necrotic tissue decreased by an average of 4.1 cm(2) (P = 0.02). After 5 weeks of therapy, conventionally treated wounds were still covered with necrotic tissue over 33% of their surface, whereas after only 4 weeks of therapy maggot-treated wounds were completely debrided (P = 0.001). Maggot therapy was also associated with hastened growth of granulation tissue and greater wound healing rates. CONCLUSIONS: Maggot therapy was more effective and efficient in debriding nonhealing foot and leg ulcers in male diabetic veterans than was continued conventional care. Article Published Date : Feb 01, 2003

Maggot versus conservative debridement therapy for the treatment of pressure ulcers.

Abstract Title: Maggot versus conservative debridement therapy for the treatment of pressure ulcers. Abstract Source: Wound Repair Regen. 2002 Jul-Aug;10(4):208-14. PMID: 12191002 Abstract Author(s): Ronald A Sherman Article Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-4800, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: To define the efficacy and safety of maggot therapy, a cohort of 103 inpatients with 145 pressure ulcers was evaluated. Sixty-one ulcers in 50 patients received maggot therapy at some point during their monitored course; 84 ulcers in 70 patients did not. Debridement and wound healing could be quantified for 43 maggot-treated wounds and 49 conventionally treated wounds. Eighty percent of maggot-treated wounds were completely debrided, while only 48% of wounds were completely debrided with conventional therapy alone (p=0.021). Within 3 weeks, maggot-treated wounds contained one-third the necrotic tissue (p = 0.05) and twice the granulation tissue (p<0.001), compared to non-maggot-treated wounds. Of the 31 measurable maggot-treated wounds monitored initially during conventional therapy, necrotic tissue decreased 0.2 cm(2) per week during conventional therapy, while total wound area increased 1.2 cm(2) per week. During maggot therapy, necrotic tissue decreased 0.8 cm(2) per week (p = 0.003) and total wound surface area decreased 1.2 cm2 per week (p = 0.001). Maggot therapy was more effective and efficient in debriding chronic pressure ulcers than were the conventional treatments prescribed. Patients readily accepted maggot therapy, and adverse events were uncommon. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2002

Maggot therapy for the treatment of intractable wounds.

Abstract Title: Maggot therapy for the treatment of intractable wounds. Abstract Source: Int J Dermatol. 1999 Aug;38(8):623-7. PMID: 10487456 Abstract Author(s): K Y Mumcuoglu, A Ingber, L Gilead, J Stessman, R Friedmann, H Schulman, H Bichucher, I Ioffe-Uspensky, J Miller, R Galun, I Raz Article Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Fly maggots have been known for centuries to help debride and heal wounds. Maggot therapy was first introduced in the USA in 1931 and was routinely used there until the mid-1940s in over 300 hospitals. With the advent of antimicrobiols, maggot therapy became rare until the early 1990s, when it was re-introduced in the USA, UK, and Israel. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of maggot therapy for the treatment of intractable, chronic wounds and ulcers in long-term hospitalized patients in Israel. METHODS: Twenty-five patients, suffering mostly from chronic leg ulcers and pressure sores in the lower sacral area, were treated in an open study using maggots of the green bottle fly, Phaenicia sericata. The wounds had been present for 1-90 months before maggot therapy was applied. Thirty-five wounds were located on the foot or calf of the patients, one on the thumb, while the pressure sores were on the lower back. Sterile maggots (50-1000) were administered to the wound two to five times weekly and replaced every 1-2 days. Hospitalized patients were treated in five departments of the Hadassah Hospital, two geriatric hospitals, and one outpatient clinic in Jerusalem. The underlying diseases or the causes of the development of wounds were venous stasis (12), paraplegia (5), hemiplegia (2), Birger's disease (1), lymphostasis (1), thalassemia (1), polycythemia (1), dementia (1), and basal cell carcinoma (1). Subjects were examined daily or every second day until complete debridement of the wound was noted. RESULTS: Complete debridement was achieved in 38 wounds (88.4%); in three wounds (7%), the debridement was significant, in one (2.3%) partial, and one wound (2.3%) remained unchanged. In five patients who were referred for amputation of the leg, the extremities was salvaged after maggot therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Maggot therapy is a relatively rapid and effective treatment, particularly in large necrotic wounds requiring debridement and resistant to conventional treatment and conservative surgical intervention. Article Published Date : Aug 01, 1999
Therapeutic Actions Maggot therapy

NCBI pubmed

Design and Biological Evaluation of Antifouling Dihydrostilbene Oxime Hybrids.

Related Articles Design and Biological Evaluation of Antifouling Dihydrostilbene Oxime Hybrids. Mar Biotechnol (NY). 2018 Apr;20(2):257-267 Authors: Moodie LWK, Cervin G, Trepos R, Labriere C, Hellio C, Pavia H, Svenson J Abstract By combining the recently reported repelling natural dihydrostilbene scaffold with an oxime moiety found in many marine antifoulants, a library of nine antifouling hybrid compounds was developed and biologically evaluated. The prepared compounds were shown to display a low antifouling effect against marine bacteria but a high potency against the attachment and growth of microalgae down to MIC values of 0.01 μg/mL for the most potent hybrid. The mode of action can be characterized as repelling via a reversible non-toxic biostatic mechanism. Barnacle cyprid larval settlement was also inhibited at low μg/mL concentrations with low levels or no toxicity observed. Several of the prepared compounds performed better than many reported antifouling marine natural products. While several of the prepared compounds are highly active as antifoulants, no apparent synergy is observed by incorporating the oxime functionality into the dihydrostilbene scaffold. This observation is discussed in light of recently reported literature data on related marine natural antifoulants and antifouling hybrids as a potentially general strategy for generation of improved antifoulants. PMID: 29532333 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Nardostachys jatamansi Ethanol Extract Ameliorates Aβ42 Cytotoxicity.

Related Articles Nardostachys jatamansi Ethanol Extract Ameliorates Aβ42 Cytotoxicity. Biol Pharm Bull. 2018 Apr 01;41(4):470-477 Authors: Liu QF, Jeon Y, Sung YW, Lee JH, Jeong H, Kim YM, Yun HS, Chin YW, Jeon S, Cho KS, Koo BS Abstract The Nardostachys jatamansi DC (NJ) root has been used as a sedative or analgesic to treat neurological symptoms and pain in traditional Korean medicine. Here, we investigate the potential effects of NJ on Alzheimer's disease (AD) and reveal the molecular mechanism through which NJ exerts its effects. The neuroprotective effect of the NJ root ethanol extract against β amyloid (Aβ) toxicity was examined in vitro using a cell culture system and in vivo using a Drosophila AD model. The NJ extract and chlorogenic acid, a major component of NJ, inhibited Aβ-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, the NJ extract rescued the neurological phenotypes of the Aβ42-expressing flies (decreased survival and pupariation rate and a locomotor defect) and suppressed Aβ42-induced cell death in the brain. We also found that NJ extract intake reduced glial cell number, reactive oxygen species level, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, and nitric oxide level in Aβ42-expressing flies, without affecting Aβ accumulation. These data suggest that the neuroprotective activity of NJ might be associated with its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, as well as its inhibitory action against ERK signaling; thus, NJ is a promising medicinal plant for the development of AD treatment. PMID: 29398668 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Effects of selected Palestinian plants on the in vitro exsheathment of the third stage larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes.

Related Articles Effects of selected Palestinian plants on the in vitro exsheathment of the third stage larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes. BMC Vet Res. 2017 Nov 03;13(1):308 Authors: Jamous RM, Ali-Shtayeh MS, Abu-Zaitoun SY, Markovics A, Azaizeh H Abstract BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal parasites are one of the main restrictions to small ruminant production. Their pathological importance is primarily related to the major production losses, in quantity or quality, induced by the direct action of worms. Control of these parasites is based exclusively on the frequent use of anthelmintic drugs. However, the resistance to anthelmintics in worm populations after commercialisation of chemical drugs is now widespread. Therefore, there is a need to find new natural resources to ensure sustainable and effective treatment and control of these parasites. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anthelmintic activity, as minimum inhibitory concentration (IC 50 mg/mL), of different plant extracts using larval exsheathment inhibition assay using a two-species but steady population of parasitic nematodes (ca. 20% Teladorsagia circumcinta and 80% Trichostrongylus colubriformis). RESULTS: The study showed that the ethanolic extracts of 22 out of the 48 plant extracts, obtained from 46 plant species, have an inhibitory effect >50% (at concentrations of 100 mg/mL) on the third stage larvae (L3) of the nematodes exhibited the strongest inhibition activity (94%) with IC 50 of 0.02 mg/mL, where other members of the Rhamnaceae family have shown to possess strong anthelmintic activity (70-89%). CONCLUSIONS: Plant extracts are potential rich resources of anthelmintics to combat helminthic diseases. Our results suggest that extracts from Rhamnus elaternus, Epilobium hirsutum, Leucaena leucocephala and Rhamnus palaestinus have promising anthelmintic activity, with potential applications in animal therapeutics and feed. PMID: 29100544 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Pruritic rash on the buttock.

Related Articles Pruritic rash on the buttock. Cutis. 2017 Apr;99(4):232;262;264 Authors: Osswald B, Gilson RT PMID: 28492597 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]