Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Martial Arts Practice

A randomized controlled trial of Kung Fu training for metabolic health in overweight/obese adolescents: the "martial fitness" study.

Abstract Title: A randomized controlled trial of Kung Fu training for metabolic health in overweight/obese adolescents: the "martial fitness" study. Abstract Source: J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Jul;22(7):595-607. PMID: 19774841 Abstract Author(s): Tracey W Tsang, Michael Kohn, Chin Moi Chow, Maria Fiatarone Singh Abstract: Twenty overweight/obese adolescents underwent six months of Kung Fu or placebo (Tai Chi) training, 3x.wk(-1). Outcomes included fasting insulin and insulin resistance, lipids, glucose and HbA(1c), and C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP decreased significantly (p = 0.03) in both groups over time at six months. Although insulin sensitivity did not change, HbA(1c) tended to decrease over time (p = 0.09), again with no group difference (p = 0.60). Reduced CRP was related to increased upper body strength (p = 0.01). Increased lean body mass was related to reductions in HbA(1c), insulin resistance, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Improvements in lean body mass appear to have a potential role in favorable metabolic outcomes, independent of changes in fat mass. Further research in this area is warranted before definite conclusions can be drawn about the efficacy of martial arts training for metabolic outcomes in this cohort. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2009
Therapeutic Actions Martial Arts Practice

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BONE MASS BY QUANTITATIVE ULTRASOUND OF FINGER PHALANGES IN YOUNG KARATE PRACTITIONERS.

Related Articles BONE MASS BY QUANTITATIVE ULTRASOUND OF FINGER PHALANGES IN YOUNG KARATE PRACTITIONERS. Rev Paul Pediatr. 2017 Oct-Dec;35(4):436-442 Authors: Barbeta CJO, Gonçalves EM, Ribeiro KDS, Ribeiro R, Roman EP, Guerra-Júnior G Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate bone mass by quantitative ultrasound of the phalanges in young karate practitioners compared to a control group. METHODS: Sample composed of 162 karate practitioners (52 females) and 326 healthy controls (110 females) aged 6 to 16 years old, in Western Paraná (Southern Brazil). Weight, height, BMI, amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS) and bone transmission time (BTT) were evaluated. BMI, AD-SoS and BTT values were converted to Z scores. Mann-Whitney, chi-square or Fisher Exact tests and multiple linear regression were applied, with significance level set at p≤0.05. RESULTS: Both genders showed higher values of BTT as Z scores when compared to control group. Females from the control group had higher AD-SoS values (m/s and Z score) compared to female karate practitioners. When relative and absolute frequencies were assessed according to BTT Z score in both groups, male karate practitioners' bone mass was shown to be adequate more frequently. In female practitioners, age and weight were independent predictors of AD-SoS (R2=0.42) and BTT (R2=0.45), respectively. Among male karate practitioners, age was related to 26% of AD-SoS variances and height was responsible for 36% of BTT variances. CONCLUSIONS: Children and adolescents who practice karate were shown to have more bone mass in comparison to the control group, regardless of gender. BTT was more sensitive for this evaluation. PMID: 28977128 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Effects of Taping on Achilles Tendon Protection and Kendo Performance.

Related Articles Effects of Taping on Achilles Tendon Protection and Kendo Performance. J Sport Rehabil. 2018 Mar 01;27(2):157-164 Authors: Tsai FH, Chu IH, Huang CH, Liang JM, Wu JH, Wu WL Abstract CONTEXT: It has been reported that there is a high rate of Achilles tendon injury among kendo athletes. For protection and to support the area, kendo athletes habitually use taping during practice or games. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of various taping techniques on injury prevention and functional performance in kendo athletes. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: 15 University Kendo Team athletes with at least 2 y kendo experience. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Athletes completed 5 stepping backwards and striking cycles under 4 taping conditions: no taping, athletic taping of ankle joint (AT-Ankle), athletic taping of Achilles tendon (AT-Achilles), and Kinesio-Tex taping of Achilles tendon (KT-Achilles). Jump distance, lower limb angular motion, left foot-ground contact time, Achilles tendon force (ATF), and soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle activities were measured. RESULTS: Lowest peak ATF was found in AT-Achilles during heel-down phase, with statistically significant difference from KT-Achilles peak force. Significant decline of soleus muscle electromyography amplitude was also found when compared to no taping during heel-down phase and other conditions during pushing phase. Conversely, KT-Achilles showed significant decrease in foot-ground contact time compared with no taping and greater ankle range of motion than in AT-Ankle. CONCLUSION: To protect the Achilles tendon, AT-Achilles taping is recommended since it tends to decrease ATF. Conversely, to enhance athlete performance, we recommend KT-Achilles taping to speed up kendo striking motion. However, the Achilles tendon must withstand greatest forces concurrently. This finding implies that AT-Achilles taping can protect the injured Achilles tendon and KT-Achilles taping can enhance performance on the kendo striking motion. PMID: 28253065 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]