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The SENSE Study: Treatment Mechanisms of a Cognitive Behavioral and Mindfulness-Based Group Sleep Improvement Intervention for At-Risk Adolescents.

Related Articles The SENSE Study: Treatment Mechanisms of a Cognitive Behavioral and Mindfulness-Based Group Sleep Improvement Intervention for At-Risk Adolescents. Sleep. 2017 Jun 01;40(6): Authors: Blake M, Schwartz O, Waloszek JM, Raniti M, Simmons JG, Murray G, Blake L, Dahl RE, Bootzin R, McMakin DL, Dudgeon P, Trinder J, Allen NB Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to test whether a cognitive behavioral and mindfulness-based group sleep intervention would improve sleep and anxiety on school nights in a sample of at-risk adolescents. We also examined whether benefits to sleep and anxiety would be mediated by improvements in sleep hygiene awareness and presleep hyperarousal. Methods: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial conducted with 123 adolescent participants (female = 60%; mean age = 14.48) who had high levels of sleep problems and anxiety symptoms. Participants were randomized into a sleep improvement intervention (n = 63) or active control "study skills" intervention (n = 60). Preintervention and postintervention, participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS), Sleep Beliefs Scale (SBS), and Presleep Hyperarousal Scale (PSAS) and wore an actiwatch and completed a sleep diary for five school nights. Results: The sleep intervention condition was associated with significantly greater improvements in actigraphy-measured sleep onset latency (SOLobj), sleep diary measured sleep efficiency (SEsubj), PSQI, SCAS, SBS, and PSAS, with medium to large effect sizes. Improvements in the PSQI and SCAS were specifically mediated by the measured improvements in the PSAS that resulted from the intervention. Improvements in SOLobj and SEsubj were not specifically related to improvements in any of the putative treatment mechanisms. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that presleep arousal but not sleep hygiene awareness is important for adolescents' perceived sleep quality and could be a target for new treatments of adolescent sleep problems. PMID: 28431122 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Reducing Stress Among Mothers in Drug Treatment: A Description of a Mindfulness Based Parenting Intervention.

Related Articles Reducing Stress Among Mothers in Drug Treatment: A Description of a Mindfulness Based Parenting Intervention. Matern Child Health J. 2017 Jun;21(6):1377-1386 Authors: Short VL, Gannon M, Weingarten W, Kaltenbach K, LaNoue M, Abatemarco DJ Abstract Background Parenting women with substance use disorder could potentially benefit from interventions designed to decrease stress and improve overall psychosocial health. In this study we assessed whether a mindfulness based parenting (MBP) intervention could be successful in decreasing general and parenting stress in a population of women who are in treatment for substance use disorder and who have infants or young children. Methods MBP participants (N = 59) attended a two-hour session once a week for 12 weeks. Within-group differences on stress outcome measures administered prior to the beginning of the MBP intervention and following the intervention period were investigated using mixed-effects linear regression models accounting for correlations arising from the repeated-measures. Scales assessed for pre-post change included the Perceived Stress Scale-10 (PSS) and the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI). Results General stress, as measured by the PSS, decreased significantly from baseline to post-intervention. Women with the highest baseline general stress level experienced the greatest change in total stress score. A significant change also occurred across the Parental Distress PSI subscale. Conclusions Findings from this innovative interventional study suggest that the addition of MBP within treatment programs for parenting women with substance use disorder is an effective strategy for reducing stress within this at risk population. PMID: 28078528 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]