Therapeutic Actions Myofascial Release

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Combined Effects of Self-Myofascial Release and Dynamic Stretching on Range of Motion, Jump, Sprint, and Agility Performance.

Related Articles Combined Effects of Self-Myofascial Release and Dynamic Stretching on Range of Motion, Jump, Sprint, and Agility Performance. J Strength Cond Res. 2018 Jun 14;: Authors: Richman ED, Tyo BM, Nicks CR Abstract Richman, ED, Tyo, BM, and Nicks, CR. Combined effects of self-myofascial release and dynamic stretching on range of motion, jump, sprint, and agility performance. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-Massage has been used as both a pre- and post-exercise modality with purported benefits to flexibility and athletic performance. This study was designed to determine the effect of a 6-minute protocol of self massage known as self-myofascial release (SMR) using a foam rolling device in conjunction with a general warm-up and sport-specific dynamic stretching (DS) session on flexibility and explosive athletic performance in a sample of 14 female collegiate athletes. After familiarization, participants completed 2 testing sessions that began with 5 minutes of jogging at a self-selected pace, followed by either a 6-minute foam rolling session (SMR) or 6 minutes of light walking (LW) and a subsequent 6-minute period of sport-specific DS. Sit-and-reach (SR) was measured after a general warm-up, the SMR, or LW session, and following DS, after which participants performed 3 trials each of squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DJ). Two additional tests, the agility T-Test (TT) and a 10-yd short sprint (SP), were then performed. The change in SR after SMR was significantly greater than the change seen in SR after LW, although the total changes seen in each condition were not statistically different after the addition of DS. Squat jump and CMJ improved by 1.72 ± 2.47 cm and 2.63 ± 3.74 cm (p = 0.070, p = 0.070), with no significant change to DJ, SP, and TT. Self-myofascial release in the form of foam rolling after a general warm-up and preceding a DS session seems to improve SJ and CMJ with no detriment to flexibility, DJ, sprint, and agility performance in comparison with LW and DS. PMID: 29912081 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Response to the letter to the editor on "Effects of Myofascial Release on Pressure Pain Thresholds in Patients with Neck Pain. A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial".

Related Articles Response to the letter to the editor on "Effects of Myofascial Release on Pressure Pain Thresholds in Patients with Neck Pain. A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial". Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2018 Jun 15;: Authors: Rodríguez-Huget M, Lomas-Vega R PMID: 29912003 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Measuring effect size - to standardize on not to standardize? (Comment on "Effects of myofascial release on pressure pain thresholds in patients with neck pain" by Rodríguez-Huguet et al.1).

Related Articles Measuring effect size - to standardize on not to standardize? (Comment on "Effects of myofascial release on pressure pain thresholds in patients with neck pain" by Rodríguez-Huguet et al.1). Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2018 Jun 15;: Authors: Saltychev M PMID: 29912002 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

A comparison of the effect of the active release and muscle energy techniques on the latent trigger points of the upper trapezius.

Related Articles A comparison of the effect of the active release and muscle energy techniques on the latent trigger points of the upper trapezius. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2017 Oct;21(4):920-925 Authors: Sadria G, Hosseini M, Rezasoltani A, Akbarzadeh Bagheban A, Davari A, Seifolahi A Abstract BACKGROUND/AIM: The increasing use of computer in daily life has brought about numerous musculoskeletal problems. Impairments in the head, neck and shoulders are more common compared with the other parts of the body. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two manual treatments in two separate groups, i.e., active release technique (ART) and muscle energy technique (MET) on the latent trigger points (LTrPs) in the upper trapezius muscle. The set criteria in the study included the active range of cervical lateral flexion, pain intensity on the visual analog scale (VAS), and the upper trapezius muscle thickness. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This clinical trial study assessed the outcome measures within and between groups before and after the intervention. The target population were 64 (32 males, 32 females) participants who had been selected from among the staff members and the students of a rehabilitation school, and the employees of an engineering company who had LTrPs in their upper trapezius muscle and were from 18 to 50 years old. RESULTS: The immediate effects of MET and ART on the patients of each groups with LTrPs in their upper trapezius muscle were increased active range of cervical lateral flexion (P < 0.001), decreased pain intensity on VAS (P < 0.05) and decreased thickness of the upper trapezius muscle (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Both manual techniques of ART and MET reduced the symptoms of LTrPs in the upper trapezius in the two groups equally, neither technique being superior to the other. PMID: 29037649 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]