CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Myofascial Release

Effects of the myofascial release in diffuse systemic sclerosis.

Abstract Title: Effects of the myofascial release in diffuse systemic sclerosis. Abstract Source: Acta Neurobiol Exp (Wars). 2010;70(2):177-86. PMID: 19761954 Abstract Author(s): Marilene Marfin Martin Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To improve breathing and functionality of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and hands, by increasing the range of motion (ROM), and to reduce the level of pain. METHOD: Twenty myofascial release (MR) sessions in 2002 with assessments (chest expansion, mouth opening, ROM of wrist and fingers). Between the 19th and the 20th session there was a break of 110 days. Every winter, 1-3 sessions have been made. RESULTS: Chest: expansion increased by 3.5 cm and pain was eliminated at the scar from a biopsy; TMJ: an 8mm increase in mouth opening with pain eliminated; hands and fingers: increase of ROM in all joints of fingers and wrists, of up to 100%, reduction in ulcerations and recovery of nail growth. CONCLUSION: The connective tissue affected by diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc) is subject to remodeling through MR, receding when the work is interrupted. Resuming the treatment on a regular basis increased the ROM in joints, reduced the effects of the Raynaud Phenomenon and the pain. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2010

Randomized multicenter feasibility trial of myofascial physical therapy for the treatment of urological chronic pelvic pain syndromes. 📎

Abstract Title: Randomized multicenter feasibility trial of myofascial physical therapy for the treatment of urological chronic pelvic pain syndromes. Abstract Source: J Urol. 2009 Aug;182(2):570-80. Epub 2009 Jun 17. PMID: 19535099 Abstract Author(s): Mary P FitzGerald, Rodney U Anderson, Jeannette Potts, Christopher K Payne, Kenneth M Peters, J Quentin Clemens, Rhonda Kotarinos, Laura Fraser, Annemarie Cosby, Carole Fortman, Cynthia Neville, Suzanne Badillo, Lisa Odabachian, Andrea Sanfield, Betsy O'Dougherty, Rick Halle-Podell, Liyi Cen, Shannon Chuai, J Richard Landis, Keith Mickelberg, Ted Barrell, John W Kusek, Leroy M Nyberg, Abstract: PURPOSE: We determined the feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial designed to compare 2 methods of manual therapy (myofascial physical therapy and global therapeutic massage) in patients with urological chronic pelvic pain syndromes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We recruited 48 subjects with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome or interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome at 6 clinical centers. Eligible patients were randomized to myofascial physical therapy or global therapeutic massage and were scheduled to receive up to 10 weekly treatments of 1 hour each. Criteria to assess feasibility included adherence of therapists to prescribed therapeutic protocol as determined by records of treatment, adverse events during study treatment and rate of response to therapy as assessed by the patient global response assessment. Primary outcome analysis compared response rates between treatment arms using Mantel-Haenszel methods. RESULTS: There were 23 (49%) men and 24 (51%) women randomized during a 6-month period. Of the patients 24 (51%) were randomized to global therapeutic massage, 23 (49%) to myofascial physical therapy and 44 (94%) completed the study. Therapist adherence to the treatment protocols was excellent. The global response assessment response rate of 57% in the myofascial physical therapy group was significantly higher than the rate of 21% in the global therapeutic massage treatment group (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: We judged the feasibility of conducting a full-scale trial of physical therapy methods and the preliminary findings of a beneficial effect of myofascial physical therapy warrants further study. Article Published Date : Aug 01, 2009

Efficacy of myofascial release techniques in the treatment of primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

Abstract Title: Efficacy of myofascial release techniques in the treatment of primary Raynaud's phenomenon. Abstract Source: J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2008 Jul;12(3):274-80. Epub 2008 Mar 5. PMID: 19083682 Abstract Author(s): Anne Walton Abstract: OBJECTIVE: This study investigated whether myofascial release techniques performed on upper body connective tissue could mitigate the frequency, duration or pain intensity associated with primary Raynaud's phenomenon. METHODS: Five treatments were administered over a 3-week treatment period on a 35-year-old female experiencing primary Raynaud's phenomenon for the past 12 years. A log was kept documenting frequency, duration and severity of pain. The myofascial work targeted the upper back, neck and arms according to hypothetical fascial meridian lines. RESULTS: Symptom duration was the one characteristic that showed improvement. After the first treatment, the duration of the subject's vasospastic episodes was reduced by almost half and continued to decrease throughout the 3 weeks of treatments. Neither the frequency or number of affected digits varied significantly from the pre-treatment weeks. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that by releasing restricted fascia, myofascial techniques may influence the duration and severity of the vasospastic episodes experienced in primary Raynaud's phenomenon. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2008
Therapeutic Actions Myofascial Release

NCBI pubmed

Physical therapy intervention for women with dyspareunia: a randomized clinical trial.

Physical therapy intervention for women with dyspareunia: a randomized clinical trial. J Sex Marital Ther. 2019 Jan 14;:1-31 Authors: Schvartzman R, Schvartzman L, Francisco Ferreira C, Vettorazzi J, Bertotto A, Celeste Osório Wender M Abstract The dyspareunia negatively affects women´s quality of life, and is a frequent complaint during the peri and postmenopausal period. A randomized trial evaluated sexual function, quality of life, pain, and pelvic floor muscle function of climacteric women aged between 40-60 years-old, with complaints of dyspareunia for at least 6 months and being sexually active. They were assessed before and after their randomization in one of the following interventions: the first group (n = 21) received five one-hour sessions of thermotherapy for relaxation of pelvic floor muscles, myofascial release, and pelvic training (Pelvic Floor Muscle Training - PFMT group). The second group (n = 21) received five one-hour sessions during which heat was applied to the lower back with myofascial release of abdominal diaphragm, piriformis, and iliopsoas muscles, with no involvement of pelvic training (Lower Back - LB group). Forty-two climacteric women with dyspareunia (mean ± SD, PFMT group: 51.9 ± 5.3 years, LB group: 50.6 ± 4.7 years, Student's t test, p = 0.397) were studied. Pain scores (mean ± SEM) in the PFMT group decreased from 7.77 ± 0.38 to 2.25 ± 0.30; and in the LB group from 7.62 ± 0.29 to 5.58 ± 0.49 (Generalized Estimating Equation - GEE model, p ≤ 0.001 for group, time, and interaction pairwise comparisons). Conclusion: The proposed pelvic floor muscle training protocol was effective to improve pain, quality of life, sexual function, and pelvic floor muscle function in climacteric women with dyspareunia. PMID: 30640585 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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