Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Oil Pulling

The Effect of Coconut Oil pulling on Streptococcus mutans Count in Saliva in Comparison with Chlorhexidine Mouthwash.

Abstract Title: The Effect of Coconut Oil pulling on Streptococcus mutans Count in Saliva in Comparison with Chlorhexidine Mouthwash. Abstract Source: J Contemp Dent Pract. 2016 ;17(1):38-41. Epub 2016 Jan 1. PMID: 27084861 Abstract Author(s): Mamta Kaushik, Pallavi Reddy, Roshni Sharma, Pooja Udameshi, Neha Mehra, Aditya Marwaha Article Affiliation: Mamta Kaushik Abstract: OBJECTIVES: Oil pulling is an age-old practice that has gained modern popularity in promoting oral and systemic health. The scientific verification for this practice is insufficient. Thus, this study evaluated the effect of coconut oil pulling on the count of Streptococcus mutans in saliva and to compare its efficacy with that of Chlorhexidine mouthwash: in vivo. The null hypothesis was that coconut oil pulling has no effect on the bacterial count in saliva. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A randomized controlled study was planned and 60 subjects were selected. The subjects were divided into three groups, Group A: STUDY GROUP: Oil pulling, Group B: STUDY GROUP: Chlorhexidine, and Group C: CONTROL GROUP: Distilled water. Group A subjects rinsed mouth with 10 ml of coconut oil for 10 minutes. Group B subjects rinsed mouth with 5 ml Chlorhexidine mouthwash for 1 minute and Group C with 5 ml distilled water for 1 minute in the morning before brushing. Saliva samples were collected and cultured on 1st day and after 2 weeks from all subjects. Colonies were counted to compare the efficacy of coconut oil and Chlorhexidine with distilled water. RESULTS: Statistically significant reduction in S. mutans count was seen in both the coconut oil pulling and Chlorhexidine group. CONCLUSION: Oil pulling can be explored as a safe and effective alternative to Chlorhexidine. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Edible oil-pulling therapy is natural, safe and has no side effects. Hence, it can be considered as a preventive therapy at home to maintain oral hygiene. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2015

Effect of coconut oil in plaque related gingivitis - A preliminary report. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of coconut oil in plaque related gingivitis - A preliminary report. Abstract Source: Niger Med J. 2015 Mar-Apr;56(2):143-7. PMID: 25838632 Abstract Author(s): Faizal C Peedikayil, Prathima Sreenivasan, Arun Narayanan Article Affiliation: Faizal C Peedikayil Abstract: BACKGROUND: Oil pulling or oil swishing therapy is a traditional procedure in which the practitioners rinse or swish oil in their mouth. It is supposed to cure oral and systemic diseases but the evidence is minimal. Oil pulling with sesame oil and sunflower oil was found to reduce plaque related gingivitis. Coconut oil is an easily available edible oil. It is unique because it contains predominantly medium chain fatty acids of which 45-50 percent is lauric acid. Lauric acid has proven anti inflammatory and antimicrobial effects. No studies have been done on the benefits of oil pulling using coconut oil to date. So a pilot study was planned to assess the effect of coconut oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of coconut oil pulling/oil swishing on plaque formation and plaque induced gingivitis. A prospective interventional study was carried out. 60 age matched adolescent boys and girls in the age-group of 16-18 years with plaque induced gingivitis were included in the study and oil pulling was included in their oral hygiene routine. The study period was 30 days. Plaque and gingival indices of the subjects were assessed at baseline days 1,7,15 and 30. The data was analyzed using paired t test. RESULTS: A statistically significant decrease in the plaque and gingival indices was noticed from day 7 and the scores continued to decrease during the period of study. CONCLUSION: Oil pulling using coconut oil could be an effective adjuvant procedure in decreasing plaque formation and plaque induced gingivitis. Article Published Date : Feb 28, 2015

Effect of oil pulling on halitosis and microorganisms causing halitosis: a randomized controlled pilot trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of oil pulling on halitosis and microorganisms causing halitosis: a randomized controlled pilot trial. Abstract Source: J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent. 2011 Apr-Jun;29(2):90-4. PMID: 21911944 Abstract Author(s): Sharath Asokan, R Saravana Kumar, Pamela Emmadi, R Raghuraman, N Sivakumar Article Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College, Chennai, India. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Oil pulling therapy has been used extensively as a traditional Indian folk remedy for many years for strengthening teeth, gums, and jaws and to prevent decay, oral malodor, bleeding gums and dryness of throat, and cracked lips. AIMS: The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of oil pulling with sesame oil on halitosis and the microorganisms that could be responsible for it and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine mouthwash. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Group I (oil pulling) and group II (chlorhexidine) included 10 adolescents each. The following parameters were assessed: marginal gingival index, plaque index, organoleptic breath assessment (ORG 1), self-assessment of breath (ORG 2), and BANA test from tongue coating samples on days 0 and 14 of the experimental period. RESULTS: The comparisons of the pre and post therapy values of plaque and modified gingival index score showed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.005 and 0.007, respectively) in group I and II. There was a definite reduction in the ORG 1, ORG 2, scores and BANA test score in both groups I and II. CONCLUSIONS: Oil pulling therapy has been equally effective like chlorhexidine on halitosis and organisms, associated with halitosis. Article Published Date : Apr 01, 2011

Tooth brushing, oil pulling and tissue regeneration: A review of holistic approaches to oral health. 📎

Abstract Title: Tooth brushing, oil pulling and tissue regeneration: A review of holistic approaches to oral health. Abstract Source: J Ayurveda Integr Med. 2011 Apr ;2(2):64-8. PMID: 21760690 Abstract Author(s): Abhinav Singh, Bharathi Purohit Article Affiliation: Department of Public Health Dentistry, People's College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, India. Abstract: Even though dentistry was not a specialized branch of Ayurveda, it is included in its Shalakya Tantra (system of surgery). Problems such as deformities of the oral cavity, plaques and infections were managed in ancient India. Traditional medicine can treat various infectious and chronic conditions. Research has shown that all kinds of chewing sticks described in ancient Ayurveda texts have medicinal and anti-cariogenic properties. Its oil pulling (Kaval, Gandush) practice is claimed to cure about 30 systemic diseases. Amla (Emblic myrobalan), is a general rebuilder of oral health. Bilberry fruit (Vaccinium myrtillus) and hawthorn berry (Crateagus oxycanthus) stabilize collagen, strengthening the gum tissue. Liquorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabral) promotes anti-cavity action, reduces plaque, and has an antibacterial effect. Use of safe, quality products and practices should be ensured based on available evidence if traditional medicine is to be acknowledged as part of primary health care. Scientific validations of the Ayurveda dental health practices could justify their incorporation into modern dental care. Publicity of these techniques using appropriate media would benefit the general population by giving more confidence in the ancient practices, thus preventing tooth decay and loss. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2011

Mechanism of oil-pulling therapy - in vitro study. 📎

Abstract Title: Mechanism of oil-pulling therapy - in vitro study. Abstract Source: Indian J Dent Res. 2011 Jan-Feb;22(1):34-7. PMID: 21525674 Abstract Author(s): Sharath Asokan, T K Rathinasamy, N Inbamani, Thangam Menon, S Senthil Kumar, Pamela Emmadi, R Raghuraman Article Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College, Chennai, India. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Oil pulling has been used extensively as a traditional Indian folk remedy without scientific proof for many years for strengthening teeth, gums and jaws and to prevent decay, oral malodor, bleeding gums and dryness of throat and cracked lips. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of sesame oil and lignans isolated from sesame oil on oral microorganisms and to check whether saponification or emulsification occurs during oil-pulling therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The in vitro study was carried out in three different phases: (1) Antibacterial activity of the lignans and sesame oil were tested by minimum inhibitory concentration assay by agar dilution method and agar well diffusion method, respectively. (2) Increase in free fatty acid level of oil and the quantity of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) used up in the titration are good indicators of saponification process. This was assessed using analytical tests for vegetable oils. (3) Swished oil was observed under light microscope to assess the status of the oil, presence of microorganisms, oral debris and foreign bodies. RESULTS: Sesamin and sesamolin isolated from sesame oil did not have any antibacterial effect against oral microorganisms like Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus viridans. Emulsification of sesame oil occurs during oil-pulling therapy. Increased consumption of NaOH in titration is a definite indication of a possible saponification process. CONCLUSION: The myth that the effect of oil-pulling therapy on oral health was just a placebo effect has been broken and there are clear indications of possible saponification and emulsification process, which enhances its mechanical cleaning action. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2011

Effect of oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis: a randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis: a randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. Abstract Source: Indian J Dent Res. 2009 Jan-Mar;20(1):47-51. PMID: 19336860 Abstract Author(s): Sharath Asokan, Pamela Emmadi, Raghuraman Chamundeswari Abstract: BACKGROUND: Oil pulling has been used extensively as a traditional Indian folk remedy for many years for strengthening teeth, gums, and the jaw and to prevent decay, oral malodor, bleeding gums, dryness of the throat, and cracked lips. AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oil pulling with sesame oil on plaque-induced gingivitis and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine mouthwash. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 20 age-matched adolescent boys with plaque-induced gingivitis were selected for this study. They were divided randomly into the study or oil pulling group (Group I) and the control or chlorhexidine group (Group II) with 10 subjects in each group. Plaque index and modified gingival index scores were recorded for the 20 subjects and baseline plaque samples were also collected. The plaque samples were used to identify the microorganisms and to measure the total colony count of the aerobic microorganisms present. The study group was subjected to oil pulling with sesame oil and the control group was given chlorhexidine mouthwash everyday in the morning before brushing. Reassessment of the index scores and collection of plaque for measuring the colony count of the aerobic microorganisms was done after 10 days. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant reduction of the pre- and post-values of the plaque and modified gingival index scores in both the study and control groups (P < 0.001 in both). There was a considerable reduction in the total colony count of aerobic microorganisms present in both the groups. CONCLUSION: The oil pulling therapy showed a reduction in the plaque index, modified gingival scores, and total colony count of aerobic microorganisms in the plaque of adolescents with plaque-induced gingivitis. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2009

Effect of oil pulling on Streptococcus mutans count in plaque and saliva using Dentocult SM Strip mutans test: a randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of oil pulling on Streptococcus mutans count in plaque and saliva using Dentocult SM Strip mutans test: a randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. Abstract Source: J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent. 2008 Mar;26(1):12-7. PMID: 18408265 Abstract Author(s): S Asokan, J Rathan, M S Muthu, Prabhu V Rathna, P Emmadi, , Abstract: BACKGROUND: Oil pulling has been used extensively for many years, without scientific evidence or proof, as a traditional Indian folk remedy to prevent teeth decay, oral malodor, bleeding gums, dryness of throat and cracked lips, and for strengthening the teeth, gums, and jaws. AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oil pulling with sesame oil on the count of Streptococcus mutans in plaque and saliva of children, using the Dentocult SM Strip mutans test, and to compare its efficacy with that of chlorhexidine mouthwash. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty age-matched adolescent boys were selected based on information obtained through a questionnaire. They were divided randomly into two groups: the control or chlorhexidine group (group I) and the study or oil pulling group (group II); there were ten subjects in each group. Plaque and saliva samples were collected from all the 20 subjects on the strips from the Dentocult SM kit and, after incubation, the presence of S. mutans was evaluated using the manufacturers' chart. The study group practiced oil pulling with sesame oil and the control group used chlorhexidine mouthwash for 10 min every day in the morning before brushing. Samples were collected from both groups after 24 h, 48 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks and the efficacy of oil pulling was compared with that of chlorhexidine mouthwash. RESULTS: There was a reduction in the S. mutans count in the plaque and saliva samples of both the study and the control groups. The reduction in the S. mutans count in the plaque of the study group was statistically significant after 1 and 2 weeks (P=0.01 and P=0.008, respectively); the control group showed significant reduction at all the four time points (P=0.01, P=0.04, P=0.005, and P=0.005, respectively, at 24 h, 48 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks). In the saliva samples, significant reduction in S. mutans count was seen in the control group at 48 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks (P=0.02, P=0.02, P=0.008, respectively). CONCLUSION: Oil pulling can be used as an effective preventive adjunct in maintaining and improving oral health. Article Published Date : Mar 01, 2008
Therapeutic Actions Oil Pulling

NCBI pubmed

Exogenous lipoid pneumonia associated with oil pulling: Report of two cases.

Related Articles Exogenous lipoid pneumonia associated with oil pulling: Report of two cases. Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 2018 Sep 07;88(3):922 Authors: Wong CF, Yan SW, Wong WM, Ho RSL Abstract Two ladies with history of carcinoma of tongue presenting with un-resolving pneumonia were ultimately diagnosed to have lipoid pneumonia, and both were subsequently found to be associated with the practice of oil pulling which is a popular complementary therapy. Apart from cessation of oil pulling, they were treated with repeated therapeutic lobar broncho-alveolar lavage. despite the potential benefits of oil pulling on oral health, people especially those at risk of aspiration, should be properly informed of this potential risk when considering this form of complementary therapy. PMID: 30203635 [PubMed - in process]