Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Positive Mood

Mood color choice helps to predict response to hypnotherapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. 📎

Abstract Title: Mood color choice helps to predict response to hypnotherapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Abstract Source: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2010;10:75. Epub 2010 Dec 7. PMID: 21138549 Abstract Author(s): [No authors listed] Article Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Approximately two thirds of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) respond well to hypnotherapy. However, it is time consuming as well as expensive to provide and therefore a way of predicting outcome would be extremely useful. The use of imagery and color form an integral part of the hypnotherapeutic process and we have hypothesised that investigating color and how it relates to mood might help to predict response to treatment. In order to undertake this study we have previously developed and validated a method of presenting colors to individuals for research purposes called the Manchester Color Wheel (MCW). Using this instrument we have been able to classify colors into positive, neutral and negative shades and this study aimed to assess their predictive role in hypnotherapy. METHODS: 156 consecutive IBS patients (aged 14-74, mean 42.0 years, 127 (81%) females, 29 (19%) males) were studied. Before treatment, each patient was asked to relate their mood to a color on the MCW as well as completing the IBS Symptom Severity Score, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, the Non-colonic Symptom Scale, the Quality of Life Scale and the Tellegen Absorption Scale (TAS) which is a measure of hypnotisability. Following hypnotherapy all these measures were repeated with the exception of the TAS. RESULTS: For patients with a positive mood color the odds of responding to hypnotherapy were nine times higher than that of those choosing either a neutral or negative color or no color at all (odds ratio: 8.889; p = 0.042). Furthermore, a high TAS score and the presence of HAD anxiety also had good predictive value (odds ratio: 4.024; p = 0.092, 3.917; p<0.001 respectively) with these markers and a positive mood color being independent of each other. In addition, these factors could be combined to give an even stronger prediction of outcome. Twice as many responders (63, 77.8%) had a positive mood color or were anxious or had a high TAS score compared with 32 (42.7%) without these factors (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: A positive mood color, especially when combined with HAD anxiety and a high TAS score, predict a good response to hypnotherapy. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2010
Therapeutic Actions Positive Mood

NCBI pubmed

Waist-to-hip ratio affects female body attractiveness and modulates early brain responses.

Related Articles Waist-to-hip ratio affects female body attractiveness and modulates early brain responses. Eur J Neurosci. 2018 Oct 22;: Authors: Del Zotto M, Framorando D, Pegna AJ Abstract This investigation examined the electrophysiological response underlying the visual processing of waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) in female bodies, a characteristic known to affect perceived attractiveness. WHRs of female bodies were artificially adjusted to values of 0.6, 0.7, 0.8 or 0.9. Behavioural ratings of attractiveness of the bodies revealed a preference for WHRs of 0.7 in the overall group of participants, which included both male and female heterosexual individuals. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were then recorded while participants performed a selective attention task involving photographs of female models and scrambled images. Results showed that the P1 (80-120 ms) and N1 (130-170 ms) components situated over posterior brain regions were the earliest components to be modulated by attention and bodies. Interestingly, the VPP, a vertex-positive potential occurring between 120-180 ms, produced a greater positivity for WHRs of 0.7 compared to the other ratios. However, this increase was only observed when the body stimuli were attended, while no effect was observed for unattended bodies. These findings provide evidence of an early brain sensitivity to visual attributes that constitute secondary sexual characteristics. Although they are relatively discrete from the point of view of their physical quality, these signs possess strong behavioural significance, producing greater reported attractiveness, likely by conveying the biological meaning that signals good health and greater reproductive success. Our results therefore reveal that attributes associated with sexual attractiveness in female bodies are processed rapidly in the stream of visual processing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30347463 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Synthetic small molecules as anti-biofilm agents in the struggle against antibiotic resistance.

Related Articles Synthetic small molecules as anti-biofilm agents in the struggle against antibiotic resistance. Eur J Med Chem. 2018 Oct 17;161:154-178 Authors: Parrino B, Schillaci D, Carnevale I, Giovannetti E, Diana P, Cirrincione G, Cascioferro S Abstract Biofilm formation significantly contributes to microbial survival in hostile environments and it is currently considered a key virulence factor for pathogens responsible for serious chronic infections. In the last decade many efforts have been made to identify new agents able to modulate bacterial biofilm life cycle, and many compounds have shown interesting activities in inhibiting biofilm formation or in dispersing pre-formed biofilms. However, only a few of these compounds were tested using in vivo models for their clinical significance. Contrary to conventional antibiotics, most of the anti-biofilm compounds act as anti-virulence agents as they do not affect bacterial growth. In this review we selected the most relevant literature of the last decade, focusing on the development of synthetic small molecules able to prevent bacterial biofilm formation or to eradicate pre-existing biofilms of clinically relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. In addition, we provide a comprehensive list of the possible targets to counteract biofilm formation and development, as well as a detailed discussion the advantages and disadvantages of the different current biofilm-targeting strategies. PMID: 30347328 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Subjective Age and Emotion Covariation: Findings from Two Daily Experience Studies.

Related Articles Subjective Age and Emotion Covariation: Findings from Two Daily Experience Studies. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2018 Oct 20;: Authors: Shrira A, Segel-Karpas D, Bodner E, Palgi Y Abstract Objectives: This paper focuses on an aspect of emotional complexity as seen in the covariation between positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA). Lifespan theories predict distinctive patterns of change in emotion covariation with chronological age. Nevertheless, research shows mixed evidence with most studies failing to find a significant connection between chronological age and emotion covariation. We propose to look beyond chronological age and assess the relationship between subjective age and emotion covariation. Subjective age refers to how old one perceives oneself to be, and therefore may be more pertinent to one's emotional experience than chronological age. We further explored whether the relationship between subjective age and emotion covariation is modified by chronological age. Method: We used data from two daily diary study samples (N=188, mean age=57.84, range=29-100, and N=334, mean age=58.15, range=30-90). Results: Multilevel models showed that individuals who perceived themselves as older showed stronger inverse PA-NA relationship, reflecting lower emotional complexity. Chronological age (net of subjective age) and emotion covariation were unrelated in both samples. Moreover, in Study 2 there was a three-way interaction between PA, subjective age and chronological age, suggesting that subjective age is more strongly related to emotion covariation among older adults than among younger adults. Discussion: The relationship between subjective age and emotion covariation is discussed in light of lifespan theories. PMID: 30346582 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Altitudinal variation of the gut microbiota in wild house mice.

Related Articles Altitudinal variation of the gut microbiota in wild house mice. Mol Ecol. 2018 Oct 22;: Authors: Suzuki TA, Martins FM, Nachman MW Abstract The maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in the gut is critical for the maintenance of a healthy gut microbiota. However, few studies have explored how the concentration of atmospheric oxygen affects the gut microbiota in natural populations. High altitude environments provide an opportunity to study the potential effects of atmospheric oxygen on the composition and function of the gut microbiota. Here, we characterized the cecal microbial communities of wild house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) in two independent altitudinal transects, one in Ecuador and one in Bolivia, from sea level to nearly 4000m. First, we found that differences in altitude were associated with differences in the gut microbial community after controlling for the effects of body mass, diet, reproductive status, and population of origin. Second, obligate anaerobes tended to show a positive correlation with altitude while all other microbes tended to show a negative correlation with altitude. These patterns were seen independently in both transects, consistent with the expected effects of atmospheric oxygen on gut microbes. Prevotella was the most-enriched genus at high elevations in both transects, consistent with observations in high-altitude populations of pikas, ruminants, and humans, and also consistent with observations of laboratory mice exposed to hypoxic conditions. Lastly, the renin-angiotensin system, a recently proposed microbiota-mediated pathway of blood pressure regulation, was the top predicted metagenomic pathway enriched in high altitudes in both transects. These results suggest that high altitude environments affect the composition and function of the gut microbiota in wild mammals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30346069 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Functional characterization of two cellulase genes in the Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis for wilting in tomato.

Related Articles Functional characterization of two cellulase genes in the Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis for wilting in tomato. Mol Plant Microbe Interact. 2018 Oct 22;: Authors: Hwang IS, Oh EJ, Lee HB, Oh CS Abstract Diverse plant pathogens secrete cellulases to degrade plant cell walls. Previously, the plasmid-borne cellulase gene, celA was shown to be important for the virulence of the Gram-positive bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis in tomato. However, details of the contribution of cellulases to the development of wilting in tomato have not been well determined. To better understand the contribution of cellulases to the virulence of C. michiganensis in tomato, a mutant lacking cellulase activity was generated and complemented with truncated forms of certain cellulase genes, and virulence of those strain was examined. A celA mutant of the C. michiganensis type strain LMG7333 lost its cellulase activity and almost all of its ability to cause wilting in tomato. The cellulase catalytic domain and cellulose-binding domain of CelA together were sufficient for both cellulase activity and the development of wilting in tomato. However, the expansin domain did not affect virulence or cellulase activity. The celA ortholog of C. sepedonicus restored the full virulence of the celA mutant of C. michiganensis. Another cellulase gene, celB located in the chromosome, carries a single-base deletion in most C. michiganensis strains, but does not carry a functional signal peptide in its N-terminus. Nevertheless, an experimentally modified CelB protein with a CelA signal peptide was secreted and able to cause wilting in tomato. These results indicate that cellulases are major virulence factors of C. michiganensis that causes wilting in tomato. Furthermore, there are natural variations among cellulase genes directly affecting their function. PMID: 30345870 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

What is animal happiness?

Related Articles What is animal happiness? Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2018 Oct 22;: Authors: Webb LE, Veenhoven R, Harfeld JL, Jensen MB Abstract Today, we see a growing concern for the quality of life of nonhuman animals and an accompanying call for viable means of assessing how well animals thrive. Past research focused on minimizing negatives such as stress, while more recent endeavors strive to promote positives such as happiness. But what is animal happiness? Although often mentioned, the term lacks a clear definition. With recent advances in the study of animal emotion, current interest into positive rather than negative experiences, and the call for captive and domesticated animals to have good lives, the time is ripe to examine the concept of animal happiness. We draw from the human and animal literature to delineate a concept of animal happiness and propose how to assess it. We argue that animal happiness depends on how an individual feels generally-that is, a typical level of affect. PMID: 30345570 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The Learning Curve Does Not Affect Positive Surgical Margin Status in Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy.

Related Articles The Learning Curve Does Not Affect Positive Surgical Margin Status in Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy. Urol J. 2018 Oct 21;: Authors: Islamoglu E, Karamik K, Ozsoy C, Tokgoz H, Ates M, Savas M Abstract PURPOSE: To assess the oncologic results of our robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) cases and investigate whether the learning curve (LC) affects the oncological outcomes.  Materials and Methods: Between March 2015 and September 2017, 111 patients underwent RALP by a single surgeon in our clinic. The learning curve was analyzed using the moving average method. We compared the rate of positive surgical margins(PSM) and oncological outcomes, operation times, hematocrit changes and duration of hospitalization among the patients during and after the LC. Complications were also noted according to Clavien system. RESULTS: LC analysis using the moving average method showed that the LC stabilized between cases 51-60. So, patients were classified into two groups; 1-50 cases (Group 1) and 51-111 cases (Group 2). PSM rates were 36% for group 1 and 18% for group 2, and statistically different (p=0,032). Extracapsular invasion (ECI) was significantly higher in group 1 (56,5%) than in group 2 (29,5%) (p=0,005). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that presence of ECI was an independent factor for PSM associated with the groups (OR: 2.512; 95% CI: 1.055-5.979). Both operation time and duration of postoperative hospitalization were significantly reduced from group 1 to group 2. A total of 11 patients (10%) had complications and one of them (0,9%) required surgical intervention. CONCLUSION: We can conclude that at least 50 RALP cases are needed to gain proficiency even for an experienced surgeon in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Our study demonstrates that surgeons experience can affect the perioperative variables but the LC does not affect PSM status in RALP. PMID: 30345493 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Optimization of Anterior Incision Placement for Distal Biceps Repair.

Related Articles Optimization of Anterior Incision Placement for Distal Biceps Repair. Cureus. 2018 Aug 14;10(8):e3141 Authors: Klebanov N, Wei DH, Harrison BJ, Kimball HL Abstract Introduction Damage to the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) is a known complication when using a cortical button during distal biceps tendon repair. Prior studies show that the trajectory of the drill through the biceps tuberosity can affect the distance from the PIN. We develop a mathematical model to predict the location of the tuberosity based on a palpable bony landmark and patient demographic factors. Methods The medical charts and elbow radiographs of (n = 82) adult patients were retrospectively reviewed. Using standard radiographic software, two observers measured the distance from the olecranon tip to the center of the biceps tuberosity. Multivariate regression analysis was used to build a linear model. The model was cross-validated with five arms from three distinct cadavers. A surgical wire was guided into the volar aspect of each forearm using the model, and a dissection was then performed to assess the proximity of the surgical wire to the insertion of the biceps tendon on the radial tuberosity. Results Olecranon-tuberosity distance (OTD) ranged from 52.3 mm to 77.2 mm (mean 66.5 mm). Univariate analyses revealed males had significantly longer OTD (mean 69.3 mm) compared to females (mean 61.2 mm, t-test, p < 0.001). Increased body mass index (BMI) weakly correlated with increased distance (Pearson's r = 0.22, p = 0.048). Height showed strong positive correlation with increased distance (r = 0.77, p < 0.001). Multivariate regression revealed that significant predictive factors for olecranon-tuberosity distance were height (coefficient = 35.8, p < 0.001), BMI (coefficient = 0.14, p = 0.032), and male sex (coefficient = 3.17, p = 0.0039). The average error in the cadaveric validation, measured as distance from the surgical wire to the distal biceps insertion was 1.8 mm. Conclusion A highly accurate mathematical model can be used to predict the location of the biceps tuberosity in relation to the palpable tip of the olecranon, based only on height, BMI, and sex of the patient. Knowledge of this distance can guide accurate placement of the skin incision when a transverse single-incision approach is utilized for repair of the distal biceps tendon using a cortical button. Diagnostics showed the model to be less accurate near the extremes of the measurement. Since patients with a target incision point far removed from average would most benefit from such a model, we will continue by identifying and enrolling patients at the low and high ends of the range. We further hypothesize that the technique described above could be similarly applied to benefit other procedures. PMID: 30345198 [PubMed]

CYP2D6*3 (A2549del), *4 (G1846A), *10 (C100T) and *17 (C1023T) genetic polymorphisms in Iranian breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen.

Related Articles CYP2D6*3 (A2549del), *4 (G1846A), *10 (C100T) and *17 (C1023T) genetic polymorphisms in Iranian breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. Biomed Rep. 2018 Nov;9(5):446-452 Authors: Saghafi F, Salehifar E, Janbabai G, Zaboli E, Hedayatizadeh-Omran A, Amjadi O, Moradi S Abstract There is controversy regarding the efficacy of tamoxifen in breast cancer patients who are carriers of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) gene polymorphisms. Poor metabolizer genotypes may not fully convert tamoxifen to its active metabolite endoxifen and thus have less exposure to anti-estrogen therapy. The present study was conducted to identify the prevalence of CYP2D6 genotypes among Iranian breast cancer patients. A total of 84 estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated at a referral center in the north of Iran were examined. A peripheral blood sample was obtained from each patient to determine the presence of *3, *4, *10 and *17 single nucleotide polymorphisms of the CYP2D6 gene by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis. Of the four genotypes assessed, CYP2D6*4 was the most common variant and was identified in 41 (48.8%) patients as heterozygous (G/A) and 3 (3.6%) as homozygous (A/A) alleles. CYP2D6*10 heterozygous mutated alleles (C/T) were also a common genotype that presented in 22 (26.2%) of the study subjects. Variant *17 was less common and was detected only as heterozygous (C/T) in 3 patients (3.6%). No CYP2D6*3 heterozygous or homozygous mutated alleles were observed. In conclusion, the frequency of the CYP2D6 nonfunctional alleles *4 and *10 appeared relatively high in Iranian patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer. This finding may affect the selection of an optimal hormone therapy, as patients with low CYP2D6 pathway activity may not sufficiently convert tamoxifen to its active metabolite endoxifen. PMID: 30345040 [PubMed]

Relationships between protein and energy consumed from milk replacer and starter and calf growth and first-lactation production of Holstein dairy cows.

Related Articles Relationships between protein and energy consumed from milk replacer and starter and calf growth and first-lactation production of Holstein dairy cows. J Dairy Sci. 2018 Oct 18;: Authors: Rauba J, Heins BJ, Chester-Jones H, Diaz HL, Ziegler D, Linn J, Broadwater N Abstract The objective was to determine relationships between protein and energy consumed from milk replacer and starter and calf growth and first-lactation production of Holstein heifer calves. Milk replacer and starter protein intake and metabolizable energy (ME) intake data were collected from 4,534 Holstein heifer calves for growth and 3,627 Holstein cows for production from birth year of 2004 through 2014. Calves from 3 commercial dairy farms were assigned to 45 different calf research trials at the University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center, Waseca, Minnesota, from 3 to 195 d of life. Calves were moved to heifer growers at 6 mo of age, and calves were returned to their farm of birth a few weeks before calving. Most calves (85%) were fed a 20% crude protein and 20% fat milk replacer at a rate of 0.57 kg/calf daily. Metabolizable energy and protein consumed from milk replacer and starter were calculated for each individual calf for 6 and 8 wk of age. Mixed model analyses were conducted to determine the effect of protein and energy consumed from both milk replacer and starter on calf growth and first-lactation 305-d production of milk, fat, and protein, adjusting for herd, season of birth, year, average daily gain (ADG), and calf trial. Calves with ADG >0.80 kg/d consumed more combined protein and ME than calves with lower ADG. Protein and ME intake from calf starter affected growth more than protein and ME intake from milk replacer because most calves were fed the same fixed amount of milk replacer. Calves born during the fall and winter had greater combined protein and ME intake than calves born during the spring and summer. Milk replacer protein and ME intake did not have a relationship with first-lactation 305-d milk, fat, and protein production. However, starter protein and ME intake during the first 6 and 8 wk of age had a significant positive relationship with first-lactation 305-d milk, fat, and protein production. Consequently, combined protein and combined ME intake had a positive effect on 305-d milk, fat, and protein production. Variance in protein and ME intake was high, suggesting that additional factors affect calf growth during the first 8 wk of life and milk production in first lactation. PMID: 30343927 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]