Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Reflexology

The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage and Reflexology on Pain and Fatigue in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Abstract Title: The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage and Reflexology on Pain and Fatigue in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Abstract Source: Pain Manag Nurs. 2016 Apr ;17(2):140-9. Epub 2016 Apr 16. PMID: 27091583 Abstract Author(s): Zehra Gok Metin, Leyla Ozdemir Article Affiliation: Zehra Gok Metin Abstract: Nonpharmacologic interventions for symptom management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are underinvestigated. Limited data suggest that aromatherapy massage and reflexology may help to reduce pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the effects of aromatherapy massage and reflexology on pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study sample was randomly assigned to either an aromatherapy massage (n = 17), reflexology (n = 17) or the control group (n = 17). Aromatherapy massage was applied to both knees of subjects in the first intervention group for 30 minutes. Reflexology was administered to both feet of subjects in the second intervention group for 40 minutes during weekly home visits. Control group subjects received no intervention. Fifty-one subjects with rheumatoid arthritis were recruited from a university hospital rheumatology clinic in Turkey between July 2014 and January 2015 for this randomized controlled trial. Data were collected by personal information form, DAS28 index, Visual Analog Scale and Fatigue Severity Scale. Pain and fatigue scores were measured at baseline and within an hour after each intervention for 6 weeks. Pain and fatigue scores significantly decreased in the aromatherapy massage and reflexology groups compared with the control group (p < .05). The reflexology intervention started to decrease mean pain and fatigue scores earlier than aromatherapy massage (week 1 vs week 2 for pain, week 1 vs week 4 for fatigue) (p < .05). Aromatherapy massage and reflexology are simple and effective nonpharmacologic nursing interventions that can be used to help manage pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2016

Determination of efficacy of reflexology in managing patients with diabetic neuropathy: a randomized controlled clinical trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Determination of efficacy of reflexology in managing patients with diabetic neuropathy: a randomized controlled clinical trial. Abstract Source: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2014 ;2014:843036. Epub 2014 Jan 9. PMID: 24527055 Abstract Author(s): Krishna Dalal, V Bharathi Maran, Ravindra M Pandey, Manjari Tripathi Article Affiliation: Krishna Dalal Abstract: Background. The restricted usage of existing pharmacological methods which do not seem to provide the treatment of diabetic neuropathy may lead to exploring the efficacy of a complementary therapy. In this context, this paper was devoted to evaluate the efficacy of foot reflexology. This health science works on the hypothesis that the dysfunctional states of body parts could be identified by observing certain skin features and be rectified by stimulating certain specific areas mapped on feet. Method. Subjects (N = 58) with diagnosed diabetic neuropathy were randomly distributed into reflexology and control groups in which both group patients were treated with ongoing pharmacological drugs. Reflexology group patients were additionally treated holistically with the hypothesis that this therapy would bring homeostasis among body organ functions. This was a caregiver-based study with a follow-up period of 6 months. The outcome measures were pain reduction, glycemic control, nerve conductivity, and thermal and vibration sensitivities. The skin features leading to the detection of the abnormal functional states of body parts were also recorded and analyzed. Results. Reflexology group showed more improvements in all outcome measures than those of control subjects with statistical significance. Conclusion. This study exhibited the efficient utility of reflexology therapy integrated with conventional medicines in managing diabetic neuropathy. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2013

A pilot study exploring the effects of reflexology on cold intolerance. 📎

Abstract Title: A pilot study exploring the effects of reflexology on cold intolerance. Abstract Source: J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2010 Apr;55(4):377-84. PMID: 20633515 Abstract Author(s): Wenping Zhang, Shougo Takahashi, Takashi Miki, Hisayo Fujieda, Torao Ishida Article Affiliation: Department of Acupuncture, Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Mie, Japan. Abstract: Cold intolerance is an inability to tolerate cold temperatures and is accompanied by symptoms including headache, shoulder discomfort, dizziness and palpitations. The current study was performed to examine whether reflexology therapy affected cold intolerance in human subjects and whether the treatment was systemically effective. Ten female volunteer examinees with subjective feelings of cold were examined. After a 5-minute foot bath, 10 minutes of reflexology therapy was performed on their left foot. Skin temperature and blood flow were estimated before and after treatment, together with an interview concerning their feelings of cold and daily habits. In addition, how the recovery rate was affected by the application of a chilled-water load was also estimated. Along with significant increases in skin temperature and blood flow compared with pre-treatment at the bilateral points of KI-1, LR-3, and BL-60, a faster recovery after the application of the chilled-water load was also seen in the lower limbs on both sides. From these results, we conclude that reflexology has systemic effects and is an alternative method for treating cold intolerance. Article Published Date : Apr 01, 2010

Randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of using foot reflexology to improve quality of sleep amongst Taiwanese postpartum women.

Abstract Title: Randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of using foot reflexology to improve quality of sleep amongst Taiwanese postpartum women. Abstract Source: Midwifery. 2009 Jul 3. PMID: 19577829 Abstract Author(s): Chia-Yen Li, Su-Chiu Chen, Chung-Yi Li, Meei-Ling Gau, Chiu-Mieh Huang Abstract: OBJECTIVE: to examine the effectiveness of using foot reflexology to improve sleep quality in postpartum women. DESIGN AND SETTING: randomised controlled trial, conducted at two postpartum centres in northern Taiwan. PARTICIPANTS: 65 postpartum women reporting poor quality of sleep were recruited from July 2007 to December 2007. INTERVENTIONS: participants were assigned randomly to either an intervention or a control group. Participants in both groups received the same care except for reflexology therapy. The intervention group received a single 30-minute foot reflexology session at the same time each evening for five consecutive days. Sessions were administered by a certified nurse reflexologist. MEASURES AND FINDINGS: the outcome measure was the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), and this was performed at baseline and post test. Mean PQSI scores for both groups declined over time between baseline and post test. Using a generalised estimation equation to control several confounding variables, the changes in mean PSQI were found to be significantly lower in the intervention group (beta=-2.24, standard error=0.38, p<0.001) than in the control group. CONCLUSION: an intervention involving foot reflexology in the postnatal period significantly improved the quality of sleep. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: midwives should evaluate maternal sleep quality and design early intervention programmes to improve quality of sleep in order to increase maternal biopsychosocial well-being. Midwives interested in complementary therapies should be encouraged to obtain training in reflexology and to apply it in clinical settings if it is allowed. Article Published Date : Jul 03, 2009

The efficacy of reflexology: systematic review. 📎

Abstract Title: The efficacy of reflexology: systematic review. Abstract Source: J Adv Nurs. 2008 Jun;62(5):512-20. PMID: 18489444 Abstract Author(s): Mei-Yeh Wang, Pei-Shan Tsai, Pi-Hsia Lee, Wen-Yin Chang, Che-Ming Yang Article Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Medical Science, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan. Abstract: AIM: This paper is a report of a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy of reflexology in any condition. BACKGROUND: Anecdotal evidence has shown potential benefits of reflexology in a variety of health conditions. However, the efficacy of reflexology has yet to be determined. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane library, PubMed, MEDLINE, EBM review, ProQuest Medical Bundle and SCOPUS databases were searched using the following medical subject headings or key words: reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, foot massage and zone therapy. Chinese articles were searched through the Chinese electronic periodical services and Wangfane database. The publication date was limited from 1996 to 2007. REVIEW METHODS: Studies were selected if they were written in English or Chinese, used a controlled clinical trial design, used reflexology as a stand-alone modality, and reported such outcomes as symptoms relief, quality of life and patients' perceptions of reflexology. Study quality was reviewed based on the evidence rating system of the United States Preventive Services Task Force, and studies with the evidence rating of II-2 fair or above were included in this review. RESULTS: Among the five studies suitable for review, there was only one report of a statistically significant treatment effect. Among the 12 outcome variables examined, the treatment effect size for urinary symptoms was large, whereas the effect size for other conditions was negligible. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions, with the exception of urinary symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis. Routine provision of reflexology is therefore not recommended. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2008

Randomized controlled trial of foot reflexology for patients with symptomatic idiopathic detrusor overactivity.

Abstract Title: Randomized controlled trial of foot reflexology for patients with symptomatic idiopathic detrusor overactivity. Abstract Source: Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2007 Jun;18(6):653-8. Epub 2006 Sep 27. PMID: 17003953 Abstract Author(s): Ho-Leung Jimmy Mak, Willy Cecilia Cheon, To Wong, Yu Sun John Liu, Wai Mei Anny Tong Article Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong, China. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: The aim of this study was to examine whether foot reflexology has beneficial effects on patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity. One hundred and nine women with symptomatic idiopathic detrusor overactivity were randomized into either foot reflexology treatment group or nonspecific foot massage control group. The primary outcome measure was the change in the diurnal micturition frequency. There was significant change in the number of daytime frequency in the reflexology group when compared with the massage group (-1.90 vs -0.55, p = 0.029). There was also a decrease in the 24-h micturition frequency in both groups, but the change was not statistically significant (-2.80 vs -1.04 p = 0.055). In the reflexology group, more patients believed to have received "true" reflexology (88.9 vs 67.4%, p = 0.012). This reflects the difficulty of blinding in trials of reflexology. Larger scale studies with a better-designed control group and an improved blinding are required to examine if reflexology is effective in improving patients' overall outcome. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2007

A randomised-controlled trail examining the effects of reflexology of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Abstract Title: A randomised-controlled trail examining the effects of reflexology of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Abstract Source: Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2006 May;12(2):141-7. Epub 2005 Dec 27. PMID: 16648092 Abstract Author(s): Iain S A Wilkinson, Samantha Prigmore, Charlotte F Rayner Abstract: It is known that many patients with obstructive pulmonary diseases use a number of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM). There has been a great deal of interest into the CAM recently, with the House of Lords select committee for science and technology's report suggesting randomised-controlled trials are the best means of researching the area. There is very little research into the effects of reflexology specifically on the effects it has on COPD. As such a randomised-controlled trial was set up to examine the effects of reflexology treatments on COPD. Results were qualitative and quantitative and showed that there are a number of areas of possible benefit for patients with COPD, but a larger scale study with a longer time frame is needed for a full evaluation of these effects. Article Published Date : May 01, 2006
Therapeutic Actions Reflexology

NCBI pubmed

Thermovision analysis of surface body temperature changes after thermal stimulation treatments in healthy men.

Related Articles Thermovision analysis of surface body temperature changes after thermal stimulation treatments in healthy men. Acta Bioeng Biomech. 2018;20(2):79-87 Authors: Gruszka K, Szczuka E, Całkosiński I, Sobiech KA, Chwałczyńska A Abstract PURPOSE: Among thermal stimulation treatments that have a beneficial effect on the human body general application of cold and various forms of massage are mentioned which can be assessed by means of thermovision analysis. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in the distribution of surface body temperature under the influence of whole-body cryostimulation, classical massage and hot stone massage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was conducted on a group of 40 men aged 20-24 years. They were subjected to a cryostimulation treatment at -120 °C and -140 °C, and to heat-stimulating treatments in the form of massages. Before the treatment, blood pressure and heart rate were measured. Temperature distribution in the 12 areas of the body surface was recorded using a Thermo Vision A20M Thermo Vision Camera with Therma CAM Researcher 2.8 software. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences between cryostimulation treatments in the left upper limb and the back of the trunk were found. After heat-stimulating treatments, a statistically significant increase in temperature after classic massage was observed in the lower limbs, and a similar increase in temperature was noted in the rear of the pectoral girdle and of the trunk after hot stone massage. CONCLUSIONS: The thermovision analysis showed a great variation of body surface temperature depending on the body area. The higher changes in temperature, of up to 20%, were found within the upper and lower extremities in the group treated with cryostimulation. After heat-stimulating treatments, lower temperature differences, of 2-6%, were observed, the largest within the trunk and the lower limbs. PMID: 30220714 [PubMed - in process]

Comparison of the effectiveness of complex decongestive therapy and compression bandaging as a method of treatment of lymphedema in the elderly.

Related Articles Comparison of the effectiveness of complex decongestive therapy and compression bandaging as a method of treatment of lymphedema in the elderly. Clin Interv Aging. 2018;13:929-934 Authors: Zasadzka E, Trzmiel T, Kleczewska M, Pawlaczyk M Abstract Background: Lymphedema is a chronic condition which significantly lowers the quality of patient life, particularly among elderly populations, whose mobility and physical function are often reduced. Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of multi-layer compression bandaging (MCB) and complex decongestive therapy (CDT), and to show that MCB is a cheaper, more accessible and less labor intensive method of treating lymphedema in elderly patients. Patients and methods: The study included 103 patients (85 women and 18 men) aged ≥60 years, with unilateral lower limb lymphedema. The subjects were divided into two groups: 50 treated with CDT and 53 with MCB. Pre- and post-treatment BMI, and average and maximum circumference of the edematous extremities were analyzed. Results: Reduction in swelling in both groups was achieved after 15 interventions. Both therapies demonstrated similar efficacy in reducing limb volume and circumference, but MCB showed greater efficacy in reducing the maximum circumference. Conclusion: Compression bandaging is a vital component of CDT. Maximum lymphedema reduction during therapy and maintaining its effect cannot be achieved without it. It also demonstrates its effectiveness as an independent method, which can reduce therapy cost and accessibility. PMID: 29785099 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Addressing the problem of obesity and associated cardiometabolic risk in black South African women - time for action!

Related Articles Addressing the problem of obesity and associated cardiometabolic risk in black South African women - time for action! Glob Health Action. 2017;10(1):1366165 Authors: Goedecke JH Abstract The PhD thesis of Gradidge, entitled 'Factors associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome in an ageing cohort of black women living in Soweto, Johannesburg (Study of Women in and Entering Endocrine Transition [SWEET])', attempts to understand the determinants of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a population of urban-dwelling black South African women. A conceptual framework is presented, which positions obesity as the central risk factor for MetS, and includes the possible influence of socioeconomic status, lifestyle behaviours and body size perceptions, as key determinants of obesity. This commentary focuses on the two main findings of Gradidge's thesis, namely, (i) physical activity and sedentary behaviour, and (ii) body composition and adiponectin, as risk factors for obesity and MetS in black South African women. Despite a high prevalence of obesity (48%), Gradidge showed that 75% of the women taking part in the study were meeting WHO guidelines on physical activity. This commentary suggests that the relationship between physical activity and cardiometabolic risk may be confounded by socioeconomic status. Alternatively, the intensity, and not necessarily the volume, of activity, as well as high rates of sedentary behaviour are posited as important determinants of obesity and MetS in black South African women. Accordingly, this commentary questions the veracity of the WHO guidelines on physical activity in developing countries, where most women meet the guidelines but have very poor cardiorespiratory fitness, are obese and are at high risk of MetS. Gradidge also showed that the most consistent and significant correlate of MetS in this cohort of middle-aged women was low serum levels of adiponectin. This commentary highlights various lifestyle interventions that have been shown to increase adiponectin levels. Finally, the importance of immediate action to address the problem of obesity and MetS is emphasised. PMID: 29016251 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]