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Shiatsu as an adjuvant therapy for schizophrenia: an open-label pilot study.

Abstract Title: Shiatsu as an adjuvant therapy for schizophrenia: an open-label pilot study. Abstract Source: Altern Ther Health Med. 2009 Sep-Oct;15(5):44-6. PMID: 19771930 Abstract Author(s): Pesach Lichtenberg, Agnes Vass, Hamutal Ptaya, Shany Edelman, Uriel Heresco-Levy Article Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Herzog Memorial Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. Abstract: CONTEXT: Studies have suggested a possible role for shiatsu in treating a variety of mental and physical ailments. OBJECTIVE: To determine if shiatsu can provide clinical benefit to individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. DESIGN: An open-label pilot study. SETTING: An inpatient psychiatric ward at Herzog Memorial Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. PATIENTS: Twelve hospitalized patients with chronic schizophrenia. INTERVENTION: Shiatsu treatment provided in a course of eight 40-minute biweekly sessions over 4 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All subjects were evaluated at baseline, 2 weeks, 4 weeks (end of treatment), and 12 weeks (followup). The tools used for assessment included the Clinical Global Impression (CGI), the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE). Side effects were measured using the Simpson-Angus Scale for Extrapyramidal Symptoms (SAS) and the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS). RESULTS: On all scales of psychopathology and side effects, the subjects showed a statistically and clinically significant improvement by the end of treatment. This improvement was maintained at the 12-week follow-up. These findings, while encouraging, must be considered preliminary and require confirmation and cross-validation in larger-scale controlled studies. Article Published Date : Sep 01, 2009
Therapeutic Actions Shiatsu

NCBI pubmed

The effectiveness of self-care and lifestyle interventions in primary dysmenorrhea: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Related Articles The effectiveness of self-care and lifestyle interventions in primary dysmenorrhea: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2019 Jan 17;19(1):22 Authors: Armour M, Smith CA, Steel KA, Macmillan F Abstract BACKGROUND: Menstrual pain is very common amongst young women. Despite the significant impact that menstrual pain has on academic attendance and performance, social activities and quality of life, most young women do not seek medical treatment but prefer to use self-care; commonly OTC analgesic medications and rest. Many women do not get significant pain relief from these methods, therefore other low cost, easy to learn self-care methods may be a valuable approach to management. This review and meta-analysis examines the evidence for participant lead self-care techniques. METHODS: A search of Medline, PsychINFO, Google Scholar and CINAHL was carried out in September 2017. RESULTS: Twenty-three trials including 2302 women were eligible and included in the meta-analysis. Studies examined self-delivered acupressure, exercise and heat as interventions. Risk of bias was unclear for many domains. All interventions showed a reduction in menstrual pain symptoms; exercise (g = 2.16, 95% CI 0.97 to 3.35) showed the largest effect size, with heat (g = 0.73, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.40) and acupressure (g = 0.56, 95% CI 0.10 to 1.03) showing more moderate effect sizes. Exercise (g = 0.48, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.83) and heat (g = 0.48, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.87), were more effective than analgesics in reducing pain intensity, whereas acupressure was significantly less effective (g = - 0.76, 95% CI -1.37 to - 0.15). CONCLUSION: Exercise showed large effects, while acupressure and heat showed moderate effects in reducing menstrual pain compared to no treatment. Both exercise and heat are potential alternatives to analgesic medication. However, difficulties in controlling for non-specific effects, along with potential for bias, may influence study findings. PMID: 30654775 [PubMed - in process]
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