CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Tai Chi

Effects of Tai Chi Exercise on Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Abstract Title: Effects of Tai Chi Exercise on Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Abstract Source: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2018 Mar ;55(3):737-744. Epub 2017 Nov 6. PMID: 29122618 Abstract Author(s): Wei Zhou, Yong-Hui Wan, Qian Chen, Yan-Ru Qiu, Xiao-Min Luo Article Affiliation: Wei Zhou Abstract: CONTEXT: Tai Chi exercise has been shown to improve cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and autonomic nervous system (ANS) balance in some cancer patients or survivors; however, such effects are yet to be verified in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. OBJECTIVES: To explore the effects of Tai Chi exercise on CRF in NPC patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy and then to evaluate ANS information indicated by heart rate variability parameters and their association with CRF. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial of Tai Chi exercise was conducted from January 2014 to August 2015. Participants in the Tai Chi group practiced Tai Chi a one-hour session, five sessions/week during chemoradiotherapy. Participants in the control group received usual care. The primary end points were scores of the multidimensional fatigue symptom inventory-short form (MFSI-SF). Secondary end points were heart rate variability parameters, including normalized low-frequency (nLF) power, normalized high-frequency (nHF) power, and the nLF/nHF ratio, and their association with CRF. RESULTS: One hundred fourteen patients were recruited in this study, and 83 patients completed the trial. The Tai Chi group and the control group had comparable baseline characteristics. After chemoradiotherapy, the Tai Chi group exhibited lower MFSI-SF total score and three negative subscale (general, physical, and emotional fatigue) scores and higher vigor score compared with the control group (P < 0.01 for all). The nLF/nHF ratio was significantly lower in the Tai Chi group compared to the control group after chemoradiotherapy. The MFSI-SF total score was markedly correlated with the nLF/nHF ratio. CONCLUSION: Tai Chi exercise is conducive to alleviate CRF in NPC patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. The improvement in ANS balance might fit into the process of Tai Chi for CRF management in this population. Article Published Date : Feb 28, 2018

The Impact of Combined Music and Tai Chi on Depressive Symptoms Among Community-Dwelling Older Persons: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

Abstract Title: The Impact of Combined Music and Tai Chi on Depressive Symptoms Among Community-Dwelling Older Persons: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial. Abstract Source: Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2018 Feb 13:1-5. Epub 2018 Feb 13. PMID: 29436896 Abstract Author(s): S J Liao, M P Tan, M C Chong, Y P Chua Article Affiliation: S J Liao Abstract: BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of pharmacological treatment may be limited in older persons. Several studies using Tai Chi or music therapy separately confirmed positive effects in the reduction of depressive symptoms. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the possible synergistic effect of combined music and Tai Chi on depressive symptoms. METHODS: One hundred and seven older adults with mild to moderate depressive symptoms were recruited from Ya'an city. Fifty-five participants were cluster randomized to combined music and Tai Chi group for three months, while the other fifty-two individuals were randomized to the control group that entailed routine health education delivered monthly by community nurses. The primary outcome of depressive symptoms was measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) at baseline and monthly for three months. RESULTS: At three-month follow-up, a statistically significant improvement in depressive symptoms was found in the intervention group compared with control group (F(3,315) = 69.661, P<0.001). Following adjustments for socio-demographic data, the true effect of intervention on depressive symptoms was significant (F = 41.725, P<0.01,η= 0.574). CONCLUSIONS: Combined music and Tai Chi reduced depressive symptoms among community-dwelling older persons. This represents an economically viable solution to the management of depression in highly populous developing nations. Article Published Date : Feb 12, 2018

Tai Chi Improves Cognition and Plasma BDNF in Older Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Abstract Title: Tai Chi Improves Cognition and Plasma BDNF in Older Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Abstract Source: Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2018 Feb ;32(2):142-149. Epub 2018 Jan 20. PMID: 29353543 Abstract Author(s): Somporn Sungkarat, Sirinun Boripuntakul, Sirinart Kumfu, Stephen R Lord, Nipon Chattipakorn Article Affiliation: Somporn Sungkarat Abstract: BACKGROUND: Effects of Tai Chi (TC) on specific cognitive function and mechanisms by which TC may improve cognition in older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI) remain unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of TC on cognitive functions and plasma biomarkers (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], and interleukin-10 [IL-10]) in a-MCI. METHODS: A total of 66 older adults with a-MCI (mean age = 67.9 years) were randomized to either a TC (n = 33) or a control group (n = 33). Participants in the TC group learned TC with a certified instructor and then practiced at home for 50 min/session, 3 times/wk for 6 months. The control group received educational material that covered information related to cognition. The primary outcome was cognitive performance, including Logical Memory (LM) delayed recall, Block Design, Digit Span, and Trail Making Test B minus A (TMT B-A). The secondary outcomes were plasma biomarkers, including BDNF, TNF-α, and IL-10. RESULTS: At the end of the trial, performance on the LM and TMT B-A was significantly better in the TC group compared with the control group after adjusting for age, gender, and education ( P<.05). Plasma BDNF level was significantly increased for the TC group, whereas the other outcome measures were similar between the 2 groups after adjusting for age and gender ( P<.05). CONCLUSIONS: TC training significantly improved memory and the mental switching component of executive function in older adults with a-MCI, possibly via an upregulation of BDNF. Article Published Date : Jan 31, 2018

Effects of Tai Chi exercise on patients with type 2 diabetes.

Abstract Title: Effects of Tai Chi exercise on patients with type 2 diabetes. Abstract Source: Med Sport Sci. 2008;52:230-8. PMID: 18487902 Abstract Author(s): Jing Hao Wang Abstract: This study investigated the effects of Tai Chi exercise on the levels of blood glucose, insulin and insulin receptors of patients with type 2 diabetes. Twelve subjects aged 58-75 years old (66.5 +/- 8.5 years) with type 2 diabetes participated in the study. They were trained with the protocol of Tai Chi exercise for 8 weeks. Blood glucose, serum insulin, and insulin receptor activity were measured before and after the 8-week intervention and immediately after a single bout exercise of Tai Chi after the protocol. The results showed that by 8 weeks of Tai Chi exercise, the blood glucose decreased (p<0.05), while high- and low-affinity insulin receptor numbers (r1, r2) and low-affinity insulin receptor binding capacity (R2) increased. Serum insulin increased (p<0.05) but was still within the normal range. After the single bout Tai Chi exercise, blood glucose, high- and low-affinity insulin receptor numbers (r1, r2), and their binding capacity (R1, R2) increased (p<0.05), while serum insulin did not change. The 8-week Tai Chi intervention therefore showed benefits on health status of patients with type 2 diabetes. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2008

Revealing the Neural Mechanisms Underlying the Beneficial Effects of Tai Chi: A Neuroimaging Perspective.

Abstract Title: Revealing the Neural Mechanisms Underlying the Beneficial Effects of Tai Chi: A Neuroimaging Perspective. Abstract Source: Am J Chin Med. 2018 ;46(2):231-259. PMID: 29542330 Abstract Author(s): Angus P Yu, Bjorn T Tam, Christopher W Lai, Doris S Yu, Jean Woo, Ka-Fai Chung, Stanley S Hui, Justina Y Liu, Gao X Wei, Parco M Siu Article Affiliation: Angus P Yu Abstract: Tai Chi Chuan (TCC), a traditional Chinese martial art, is well-documented to result in beneficial consequences in physical and mental health. TCC is regarded as a mind-body exercise that is comprised of physical exercise and meditation. Favorable effects of TCC on body balance, gait, bone mineral density, metabolic parameters, anxiety, depression, cognitive function, and sleep have been previously reported. However, the underlying mechanisms explaining the effects of TCC remain largely unclear. Recently, advances in neuroimaging technology have offered new investigative opportunities to reveal the effects of TCC on anatomical morphologies and neurological activities in different regions of the brain. These neuroimaging findings have provided new clues for revealing the mechanisms behind the observed effects of TCC. In this review paper, we discussed the possible effects of TCC-induced modulation of brain morphology, functional homogeneity and connectivity, regional activity and macro-scale network activity on health. Moreover, we identified possible links between the alterations in brain and beneficial effects of TCC, such as improved motor functions, pain perception, metabolic profile, cognitive functions, mental health and sleep quality. This paper aimed to stimulate further mechanistic neuroimaging studies in TCC and its effects on brain morphology, functional homogeneity and connectivity, regional activity and macro-scale network activity, which ultimately lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effects of TCC on human health. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2017

Tai Chi and Qigong for cancer-related symptoms and quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Abstract Title: Tai Chi and Qigong for cancer-related symptoms and quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Abstract Source: J Cancer Surviv. 2017 Dec 8. Epub 2017 Dec 8. PMID: 29222705 Abstract Author(s): Peter M Wayne, M S Lee, J Novakowski, K Osypiuk, J Ligibel, L E Carlson, R Song Article Affiliation: Peter M Wayne Abstract: PURPOSE: This study aims to summarize and critically evaluate the effects of Tai Chi and Qigong (TCQ) mind-body exercises on symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in cancer survivors. METHODS: A systematic search in four electronic databases targeted randomized and non-randomized clinical studies evaluating TCQ for fatigue, sleep difficulty, depression, pain, and QOL in cancer patients, published through August 2016. Meta-analysis was used to estimate effect sizes (ES, Hedges' g) and publication bias for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methodological bias in RCTs was assessed. RESULTS: Our search identified 22 studies, including 15 RCTs that evaluated 1283 participants in total, 75% women. RCTs evaluated breast (n = 7), prostate (n = 2), lymphoma (n = 1), lung (n = 1), or combined (n = 4) cancers. RCT comparison groups included active intervention (n = 7), usual care (n = 5), or both (n = 3). Duration of TCQ training ranged from 3 to 12 weeks. Methodological bias was low in 12 studies and high in 3 studies. TCQ was associated with significant improvement in fatigue (ES = - 0.53, p < 0.001), sleep difficulty (ES = - 0.49, p = 0.018), depression (ES = - 0.27, p = 0.001), and overall QOL (ES = 0.33, p = 0.004); a statistically non-significant trend was observed for pain (ES = - 0.38, p = 0.136). Random effects models were used for meta-analysis based on Q test and Icriteria. Funnel plots suggest some degree of publication bias. Findings in non-randomized studies largely paralleled meta-analysis results. CONCLUSIONS: Larger and methodologically sound trials with longer follow-up periods and appropriate comparison groups are needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn, and cancer- and symptom-specific recommendations can be made. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: TCQ shows promise in addressing cancer-related symptoms and QOL in cancer survivors. Article Published Date : Dec 07, 2017

Effects of Tai Chi-based cardiac rehabilitation on aerobic endurance, psychosocial well-being, and cardiovascular risk reduction among patients with coronary heart disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Abstract Title: Effects of Tai Chi-based cardiac rehabilitation on aerobic endurance, psychosocial well-being, and cardiovascular risk reduction among patients with coronary heart disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Abstract Source: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2017 Dec 1:1474515117749592. Epub 2017 Dec 1. PMID: 29256626 Abstract Author(s): Ting Liu, Aileen Wk Chan, Yun Hong Liu, Ruth E Taylor-Piliae Article Affiliation: Ting Liu Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Tai Chi is an attractive exercise to improve cardiovascular health. This review aimed to synthesize articles written both in Chinese and in English to evaluate the effects of Tai Chi-based cardiac rehabilitation on aerobic endurance, psychosocial well-being and cardiovascular diseases risk reduction for coronary heart diseases patients. METHODS: PRISMA guidelines were used to search major health databases to identify randomized controlled trials or non-randomized controlled clinical trials that evaluated Tai Chi intervention compared with active or non-active control groups in coronary heart disease patients. When suitable, data were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis model. RESULTS: Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Tai Chi groups showed a large and significant improvement in aerobic endurance compared with both active and non-active control interventions (standard mean difference (SMD) 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.58-1.66; p<0.001). Tai Chi groups also showed a significantly lower level of anxiety (SMD=9.28; CI: 17.46-1.10; p=0.03) and depression (SMD=9.42; CI: 13.59-5.26; p<0.001), and significantly better quality of life (SMD=0.73; 95% CI: 0.39-1.08; p<0.001) compared with non-active control groups. CONCLUSION: Significant effects of Tai Chi have been found in improving aerobic endurance and psychosocial well-being among coronary heart disease patients. Tai Chi could be a cost-effective and safe exercise option in cardiac rehabilitation. However, the effect of Tai Chi on cardiovascular disease risk reduction has not been amply investigated among coronary heart disease patients. Caution is also warranted in view of a small number of studies for this meta-analysis and potential heterogeneity in differences in the varied designs of Tai Chi intervention. Article Published Date : Nov 30, 2017

The impact of Tai Chi and Qigong mind-body exercises on motor and non-motor function and quality of life in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Abstract Title: The impact of Tai Chi and Qigong mind-body exercises on motor and non-motor function and quality of life in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Abstract Source: Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2017 May 25. Epub 2017 May 25. PMID: 28602515 Abstract Author(s): R Song, W Grabowska, M Park, K Osypiuk, G P Vergara-Diaz, P Bonato, J M Hausdorff, M Fox, L R Sudarsky, E Macklin, P M Wayne Article Affiliation: R Song Abstract: PURPOSE: To systematically evaluate and quantify the effects of Tai Chi/Qigong (TCQ) on motor (UPDRS III, balance, falls, Timed-Up-and-Go, and 6-Minute Walk) and non-motor (depression and cognition) function, and quality of life (QOL) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: A systematic search in 7 electronic databases targeted clinical studies evaluating TCQ for individuals with PD published through August 2016. Meta-analysis was used to estimate effect sizes (Hedges's g) and publication bias for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methodological bias in RCTs was assessed by two raters. RESULTS: Our search identified 21 studies, 15 of which were RCTs with a total of 735 subjects. For RCTs, comparison groups included no treatment (n = 7, 47%) and active interventions (n = 8, 53%). Duration of TCQ ranged from 2 to 6 months. Methodological bias was low in 6 studies, moderate in 7, and high in 2. Fixed-effect models showed that TCQ was associated with significant improvement on most motor outcomes (UPDRS III [ES = -0.444, p < 0.001], balance [ES = 0.544, p < 0.001], Timed-Up-and-Go [ES = -0.341, p = 0.005], 6 MW [ES = -0.293, p = 0.06], falls [ES = -0.403, p = 0.004], as well as depression [ES = -0.457, p = 0.008] and QOL [ES = -0.393, p < 0.001], but not cognition [ES = -0.225, p = 0.477]). I(2) indicated limited heterogeneity. Funnel plots suggested some degree of publication bias. CONCLUSION: Evidence to date supports a potential benefit of TCQ for improving motor function, depression and QOL for individuals with PD, and validates the need for additional large-scale trials. Article Published Date : May 24, 2017

A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Study of Tai Chi With Passive and Active Controls in the Treatment of Depressed Chinese Americans.

Abstract Title: A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Study of Tai Chi With Passive and Active Controls in the Treatment of Depressed Chinese Americans. Abstract Source: J Clin Psychiatry. 2017 May ;78(5):e522-e528. PMID: 28570792 Abstract Author(s): Albert S Yeung, Run Feng, Daniel Ju Hyung Kim, Peter M Wayne, Gloria Y Yeh, Lee Baer, Othelia E Lee, John W Denninger, Herbert Benson, Gregory L Fricchione, Jonathan Alpert, Maurizio Fava Article Affiliation: Albert S Yeung Abstract: OBJECTIVE: This pilot, randomized clinical trial investigates the effectiveness of tai chi as the primary treatment for Chinese Americans with major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: 67 Chinese Americans with DSM-IV MDD and no treatment for depression were recruited between March 2012 and April 2013 and randomized (1:1:1) into a tai chi intervention, an education program, or a waitlisted group for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS₁₇); positive response for this outcome was defined as a decrease in total score of 50% or more, and remission was defined as HDRS₁₇ ≤ 7. RESULTS: Participants (N = 67) were 72% female with a mean age of 54± 13 years. No serious adverse events were reported. After the end of the 12-week intervention, response rates were 25%, 21%, and 56%, and remission rates were 10%, 21%, and 50% for the waitlisted, education, and tai chi intervention groups, respectively. The tai chi group showed improved treatmentresponse when compared to both the waitlisted group (odds ratio [OR] = 2.11; 95% CI, 1.01-4.46) and to the education group (OR = 8.90; 95% CI, 1.17-67.70). Tai chi intervention showed significantly improved remission rate over the waitlisted group (OR = 3.01; 95% CI, 1.25-7.10), and a trend of improved remission compared to the education group (OR = 4.40; 95% CI, 0.78-24.17). CONCLUSIONS: As the primary treatment, tai chi improved treatment outcomes for Chinese Americans with MDD over both passive and active control groups. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01619631. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2017

Mind-Body Therapy for Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. 📎

Abstract Title: Mind-Body Therapy for Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Abstract Source: Children (Basel). 2017 Apr 25 ;4(5). Epub 2017 Apr 25. PMID: 28441363 Abstract Author(s): Anne Herbert, Anna Esparham Article Affiliation: Anne Herbert Abstract: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is pervasive among the pediatric population and new treatments with minimal adverse effects are necessary to be studied. The purpose of this article is to review current research studying mind-body therapies for treatment of children diagnosed with ADHD. Literature was reviewed pertaining to the effectiveness of movement-based therapies and mindfulness/meditation-based therapies for ADHD. Many positive effects of yoga, Tai Chi, physical activity, and meditation may significantly improve symptoms of ADHD among children. Article Published Date : Apr 24, 2017

Tai Chi for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Pilot Study.

Abstract Title: Tai Chi for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Pilot Study. Abstract Source: J Holist Nurs. 2017 Mar 1:898010117697617. Epub 2017 Mar 1. PMID: 29172896 Abstract Author(s): Pao-Feng Tsai, Stephanie Kitch, Jason Y Chang, G Andrew James, Patricia Dubbert, J Vincent Roca, Cheralyn H Powers Article Affiliation: Pao-Feng Tsai Abstract: PURPOSE: Explore the feasibility of a Tai Chi intervention to improve musculoskeletal pain, emotion, cognition, and physical function in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder. DESIGN: Two-phase, one-arm quasi-experimental design. METHOD: Phase 1: 11 participants completed one Tai Chi session, feasibility questionnaire, and were offered participation in Phase 2, a 12-week Tai Chi intervention. Ten participants participated in Phase 2. Pain intensity, interference, physical function scales, an emotional battery, and cognition tests were used for pre- and postintervention outcome measures. Paired t tests and thematic analysis were used for analysis. FINDINGS: In Phase 1, most felt Tai Chi would benefit health (90.9%) and expressed interest in continuing Tai Chi (6.73 out of 7). Phase 2 results showed improvement in fear-affect (raw t = -2.64, p = .03; age adjusted t = -2.90, p = .02), fear-somatic arousal (raw t = -2.53, p = .035), List Sorting Working Memory (raw t = 2.62, p = .031; age adjusted t = 2.96, p = .018), 6-Minute Walk Test ( t = 3.541, p = .008), and current level of Pain Intensity ( t = -4.00, p = .004). CONCLUSIONS: Tai Chi is an acceptable, holistic treatment to individuals with musculoskeletal pain and posttraumatic stress disorder. It may reduce pain, improve emotion, memory, and physical function. Article Published Date : Feb 28, 2017

The Effect of Tai Chi on Cardiorespiratory Fitness for Coronary Disease Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 📎

Abstract Title: The Effect of Tai Chi on Cardiorespiratory Fitness for Coronary Disease Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Abstract Source: Front Physiol. 2017 ;8:1091. Epub 2018 Jan 4. PMID: 29354065 Abstract Author(s): Ying-Li Yang, Ya-Hong Wang, Shuo-Ren Wang, Pu-Song Shi, Can Wang Article Affiliation: Ying-Li Yang Abstract: Tai Chi that originated in China as a martial art is an aerobic exercise with low-to-moderate intensity and may play a role in cardiac rehabilitation.To systematically review the effect of Tai Chi on cardiorespiratory fitness for coronary disease rehabilitation.We performed a search for Chinese and English studies in the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database, Wanfang Data, and China Science and Technology Journal Database. The search strategy included terms relating to or describing Tai Chi and coronary disease, and there were no exclusion criteria for other types of diseases or disorders. Further, bibliographies of the related published systematic reviews were also reviewed. The searches, data extraction, and risk of bias (ROB) assessments were conducted by two independent investigators. Differences were resolved by consensus. RevMan 5.3.0 was used to analyze the study results. We used quantitative synthesis if the included studies were sufficiently homogeneous and performed subgroup analyses for studies with different control groups. To minimize bias in our findings, we used GRADEpro to grade the available evidence.Five studies were enrolled-two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and three nonrandomized controlled trials (N-RCTs)-that included 291 patients. All patients had coronary disease. ROB assessments showed a relatively high selection and detection bias. Meta-analyses showed that compared to other types of low- or moderate-intensity exercise, Tai Chi could significantly improve VOmax [MD = 4.71, 95% CI (3.58, 5.84),<0.00001], but it seemed less effective at improving VOmax as compared to high-intensity exercise. This difference, however, was not statistically significant [MD = -1.10, 95% CI (-2.46, 0.26),= 0.11]. The GRADEpro showed a low level of the available evidence.Compared to no exercise or other types of exercise with low-to-moderate intensity, Tai Chi seems a good choice for coronary disease rehabilitation in improving cardiorespiratory fitness. However, owing to the poor methodology quality, more clinical trials with large sample size, strict randomization, and clear description about detection and reporting processes are needed to further verify the evidence. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2016

Tai-Chi-Chuan Exercise Improves Pulmonary Function and Decreases Exhaled Nitric Oxide Level in Both Asthmatic and Nonasthmatic Children and Improves Quality of Life in Children with Asthma. 📎

Abstract Title: Tai-Chi-Chuan Exercise Improves Pulmonary Function and Decreases Exhaled Nitric Oxide Level in Both Asthmatic and Nonasthmatic Children and Improves Quality of Life in Children with Asthma. Abstract Source: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2017 ;2017:6287642. Epub 2017 Apr 13. PMID: 28491110 Abstract Author(s): Hsin-Chia Lin, Hao-Pai Lin, Hsin-Hui Yu, Li-Chieh Wang, Jyh-Hong Lee, Yu-Tsan Lin, Yao-Hsu Yang, Pei-Yi Li, Wei-Zen Sun, Bor-Luen Chiang Article Affiliation: Hsin-Chia Lin Abstract: Tai-Chi-Chuan (TCC) is an exercise of low-to-moderate intensity which is suitable for asthmatic patients. The aim of our study is to investigate improvements of the lung function, airway inflammation, and quality of life of asthmatic children after TCC. Participants included sixty-one elementary school students and they were divided into asthmatic (n = 29) and nonasthmatic (n = 32) groups by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. Among them, 20 asthmatic and 18 nonasthmatic children volunteered to participate in a 60-minute TCC exercise weekly for 12 weeks. Baseline and postintervention assessments included forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) level, and Standardised Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ(S)). After intervention, the level of FeNO decreased significantly; PEFR and the FEV1/FVC also improved significantly in both asthmatic group and nonasthmatic group after TCC. The asthmatic children also had improved quality of life after TCC. The results indicated that TCC could improve the pulmonary function and decrease airway inflammation in both children with mild asthma and those without asthma. It also improves quality of life in mild asthmatic children. Nevertheless, further studies are required to determine the effect of TCC on children with moderate-to-severe asthma. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2016

Tai Chi Chuan and Baduanjin Increase Grey Matter Volume in Older Adults: A Brain Imaging Study. 📎

Abstract Title: Tai Chi Chuan and Baduanjin Increase Grey Matter Volume in Older Adults: A Brain Imaging Study. Abstract Source: J Alzheimers Dis. 2017 ;60(2):389-400. PMID: 28869478 Abstract Author(s): Jing Tao, Jiao Liu, Weilin Liu, Jia Huang, Xiehua Xue, Xiangli Chen, Jinsong Wu, Guohua Zheng, Bai Chen, Ming Li, Sharon Sun, Kristen Jorgenson, Courtney Lang, Kun Hu, Shanjia Chen, Lidian Chen, Jian Kong Article Affiliation: Jing Tao Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate and compare how 12-weeks of Tai Chi Chuan and Baduanjin exercise can modulate brain structure and memory function in older adults. Magnetic resonance imaging and memory function measurements (Wechsler Memory Scale-Chinese revised, WMS-CR) were applied at both the beginning and end of the study. Results showed that both Tai Chi Chuan and Baduanjin could significantly increase grey matter volume (GMV) in the insula, medial temporal lobe, and putamen after 12-weeks of exercise. No significant differences were observed in GMV between the Tai Chi Chuan and Baduanjin groups. We also found that compared to healthy controls, Tai Chi Chuan and Baduanjin significantly improved visual reproduction subscores on the WMS-CR. Baduanjin also improved mental control, recognition, touch, and comprehension memory subscores of the WMS-CR compared to the control group. Memory quotient and visual reproduction subscores were both associated with GMV increases in the putamen and hippocampus. Our results demonstrate the potential of Tai Chi Chuan and Baduanjin exercise for the prevention of memory deficits in older adults. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2016

Effect of Tai Chi Training on Dual-Tasking Performance That Involves Stepping Down among Stroke Survivors: A Pilot Study. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of Tai Chi Training on Dual-Tasking Performance That Involves Stepping Down among Stroke Survivors: A Pilot Study. Abstract Source: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2017 ;2017:9134173. Epub 2017 Nov 15. PMID: 29270204 Abstract Author(s): Wing-Nga Chan, William Wai-Nam Tsang Article Affiliation: Wing-Nga Chan Abstract: Descending stairs demands attention and neuromuscular control, especially with dual-tasking. Studies have demonstrated that stroke often degrades a survivor's ability to descend stairs. Tai Chi has been shown to improve dual-tasking performance of healthy older adults, but no such study has been conducted in stroke survivors. This study investigated the effect of Tai Chi training on dual-tasking performance that involved stepping down and compared it with that of conventional exercise among stroke survivors. Subjects were randomized into Tai Chi (= 9), conventional exercise (= 8), and control (= 9) groups. Those in the former two groups received 12-week training. Assessments included auditory Stroop test, stepping down test, and dual-tasking test involving both simultaneously. They were evaluated before training (time-1), after training (time-2), and one month after training (time-3). Tai Chi group showed significant improvement in the auditory Stroop test from time-1 to time-3 and the performance was significantly better than that of the conventional exercise group in time-3. No significant effect was found in the stepping down task or dual-tasking in the control group. These results suggest a beneficial effect of Tai Chi training on cognition among stroke survivors without compromising physical task performance in dual-tasking. The effect was better than the conventional exercise group. Nevertheless, further research with a larger sample is warranted. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2016
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Therapeutic Actions Tai Chi

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Perceived Exertion and Affect From Tai Chi, Yoga, and Stretching Classes for Elderly Women.

Perceived Exertion and Affect From Tai Chi, Yoga, and Stretching Classes for Elderly Women. Percept Mot Skills. 2019 Jan 14;:31512518823661 Authors: Follador L, Alves RC, Ferreira SDS, Silva AC, Silva SGD Abstract Tai Chi, yoga, and stretching regimens are gaining popularity as alternatives to more traditional exercise, but there is scant research regarding participants' perceived exertion and affective responses to these practices. We compared experienced states of perceived exertion, feelings of pleasure/displeasure, and arousal in 70 elderly women enrolled in groups of Tai Chi ( n = 26), yoga ( n = 25), or stretching ( n = 19) classes. Mean rates of perceived exertion, feelings of pleasure, and arousal responses were significantly higher over the time course of all three groups, while the overall mean perceived exertion ( Somewhat Hard on the Borg CR-10 scale) and pleasure responses (∼ Very Good on the Feeling Scale) were similar between them. The circumplex model of affect showed that changes occurred in the high-activation pleasure quadrant (energy on the Felt Arousal Scale). From a practical perspective, the exercise intensity and affective responses elicited during these classes made participants feel good and infused with energy, likely creating a positive memory and reinforcing continued physical activity participation. PMID: 30638426 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Cross-sectional survey of biosimilar insulin utilization in Asia: The Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation Program.

Related Articles Cross-sectional survey of biosimilar insulin utilization in Asia: The Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation Program. J Diabetes Investig. 2018 Nov;9(6):1312-1322 Authors: Gani L, Lau E, Luk A, Sobrepena L, Tran QK, Kesavadev J, Jia W, Yu W, Tsang CC, Mukhopadhyay M, Jha S, Sheu W, Ho YK, Nguyen TK, Ozaki R, So WY, Kwan C, Fu AWC, Mirasol R, Phatak SR, Kumar KMP, Aravind S, Janakiraman H, Chan JCN, JADE Collaborative Study Group Abstract AIMS/INTRODUCTION: Biosimilar insulin can reduce treatment costs, although the extent of its use is largely unknown. We examined biosimilar insulin use and its associations with the quality of glycemic control using the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation register. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional analysis in 81,531 patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes enrolled into the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation Program from 2007 to 2014. All insulin related terms are extracted from the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation portal, and compared clinical profiles between biosimilar and originator insulin users. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the association of biosimilar insulin compared with originator insulin with dosage, glycated hemoglobin and hypoglycemia events. RESULTS: Amongst 81,531 patients, 20.5% (n = 16,738) were insulin-treated. In four countries with high use of biosimilar insulin, 4.7% (n = 719) of insulin users (n = 10,197) were treated with biosimilar insulin (India n = 507, 70.3%; the Philippines n = 90, 12.5%; China n = 62, 8.6%; Vietnam n = 60, 8.3%). Biosimilar insulin users were younger and had higher body mass index, glycated hemoglobin, insulin dosage and more frequent hypoglycemia than originator insulin users. These associations were non-significant after adjustment for confounders. Only age, college education, diabetes education, lipid control, physical activity and history of cardiovascular complications were independently associated with these quality measures. CONCLUSIONS: Biosimilar insulin use is not uncommon in Asia. Data exclusion due to incomplete capturing of brand names suggests possibly higher use. The multiple determinants of the quality of glycemic control call for establishment of prospective cohorts and diabetes registers to monitor the safety and efficacy of different brands of biosimilar insulin and their impacts on clinical outcomes. PMID: 29575724 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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