Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Thermography

Effectiveness of a noninvasive digital infrared thermal imaging system in the detection of breast cancer.

Abstract Title: Effectiveness of a noninvasive digital infrared thermal imaging system in the detection of breast cancer. Abstract Source: Am J Surg. 2008 Oct;196(4):523-6. PMID: 18809055 Abstract Author(s): Nimmi Arora, Diana Martins, Danielle Ruggerio, Eleni Tousimis, Alexander J Swistel, Michael P Osborne, Rache M Simmons Article Affiliation: Department of Surgery, New York Presbyterian Hospital-Cornell, New York, NY, USA. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI) has resurfaced in this era of modernized computer technology. Its role in the detection of breast cancer is evaluated. METHODS: In this prospective clinical trial, 92 patients for whom a breast biopsy was recommended based on prior mammogram or ultrasound underwent DITI. Three scores were generated: an overall risk score in the screening mode, a clinical score based on patient information, and a third assessment by artificial neural network. RESULTS: Sixty of 94 biopsies were malignant and 34 were benign. DITI identified 58 of 60 malignancies, with 97% sensitivity, 44% specificity, and 82% negative predictive value depending on the mode used. Compared to an overall risk score of 0, a score of 3 or greater was significantly more likely to be associated with malignancy (30% vs 90%, P<.03). CONCLUSION: DITI is a valuable adjunct to mammography and ultrasound, especially in women with dense breast parenchyma. Article Published Date : Oct 01, 2008

Efficacy of computerized infrared imaging analysis to evaluate mammographically suspicious lesions. 📎

Abstract Title: Efficacy of computerized infrared imaging analysis to evaluate mammographically suspicious lesions. Abstract Source: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2003 Jan;180(1):263-9. PMID: 12490517 Abstract Author(s): Y R Parisky, A Sardi, R Hamm, K Hughes, L Esserman, S Rust, K Callahan Article Affiliation: USC/Norris Cancer Center, 1441 Eastlake Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this clinical trial was to determine the efficacy of a dynamic computerized infrared imaging system for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions in patients undergoing biopsy on the basis of mammographic findings. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A 4-year clinical trial was conducted at five institutions using infrared imaging of patients for whom breast biopsy had been recommended. The data from a blinded subject set were obtained in 769 subjects with 875 biopsied lesions resulting in 187 malignant and 688 benign findings. The infrared technique records a series of sequential images that provides an assessment of the infrared information in a mammographically identified area. The suspicious area is localized on the infrared image by the radiologist using mammograms, and an index of suspicion is determined, yielding a negative or positive result. RESULTS: In the 875 biopsied lesions, the index of suspicion resulted in a 97% sensitivity, a 14% specificity, a 95% negative predictive value, and a 24% positive predictive value. Lesions that were assessed as false-negative by infrared analysis were microcalcifications, so an additional analysis was performed in a subset excluding lesions described only as microcalcification. In this restricted subset of 448 subjects with 479 lesions and 110 malignancies, the index of suspicion resulted in a 99% sensitivity, an 18% specificity, a 99% negative predictive value, and a 27% positive predictive value. Analysis of infrared imaging performance in all 875 biopsied lesions revealed that specificity was statistically improved in dense breast tissue compared with fatty breast tissue. CONCLUSION: Infrared imaging offers a safe noninvasive procedure that would be valuable as an adjunct to mammography in determining whether a lesion is benign or malignant. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2003 Study Type : Human Study
Therapeutic Actions Thermography

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Best practices for standardized performance testing of infrared thermographs intended for fever screening.

Related Articles Best practices for standardized performance testing of infrared thermographs intended for fever screening. PLoS One. 2018;13(9):e0203302 Authors: Ghassemi P, Pfefer TJ, Casamento JP, Simpson R, Wang Q Abstract Infrared (IR) modalities represent the only currently viable mass fever screening approaches for outbreaks of infectious disease pandemics such as Ebola virus disease and severe acute respiratory syndrome. Non-contact IR thermometers (NCITs) and IR thermographs (IRTs) have been used for fever screening in public areas such as airports. While NCITs remain a more popular choice than IRTs, there has been increasing evidences in the literature that IRTs can provide great accuracy in estimating body temperature if qualified systems are used and appropriate procedures are consistently applied. In this study, we addressed the issue of IRT qualification by implementing and evaluating a battery of test methods for objective, quantitative assessment of IRT performance based on a recent international standard (IEC 80601-2-59). We tested two commercial IRTs to evaluate their stability and drift, image uniformity, minimum resolvable temperature difference, and radiometric temperature laboratory accuracy. Based on these tests, we illustrated how experimental and data processing procedures could affect results, and suggested methods for clarifying and optimizing test methods. Overall, the insights into thermograph standardization and acquisition methods provided by this study may improve the utility of IR thermography and aid in comparing IRT performance, thus improving the potential for producing high quality disease pandemic countermeasures. PMID: 30231046 [PubMed - in process]

Effect of Foot Reflexology on Capillary Blood Glucose, Tissue Temperature, and Plantar Pressure of Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus (Type 2): A Pilot Study.

Related Articles Effect of Foot Reflexology on Capillary Blood Glucose, Tissue Temperature, and Plantar Pressure of Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus (Type 2): A Pilot Study. J Chiropr Med. 2018 Sep;17(3):182-189 Authors: Silva NCM, Chaves ÉCL, Carvalho EC, Carvalho LC, Iunes DH Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of foot reflexology on capillary blood glucose, feet tissue temperature, and plantar pressure of the feet of individuals with diabetes mellitus (type 2). Methods: Forty-five individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus were stratified into 2 groups: treated (n = 21), which received orientation about foot self-care and received 12 foot reflexology sessions; and control (n = 24), which received only orientations about foot self-care. A portable glucose meter, an infrared thermography camera, and a baropodometer evaluated the variables. Results: The data indicate that, after 12 therapy sessions, there were no significant differences between the groups for producing effects on capillary blood glucose, feet tissue temperature, and plantar pressure. Conclusion: No significant effect was observed after 12 foot reflexology sessions in the variables that were evaluated. PMID: 30228809 [PubMed]

Local thermal reaction after influenza vaccination: Quantification by infrared imaging and biometric considerations.

Related Articles Local thermal reaction after influenza vaccination: Quantification by infrared imaging and biometric considerations. Vaccine. 2018 05 11;36(20):2783-2787 Authors: Hoffmann A, Dumke C, Hanschmann KO, Wicker S Abstract BACKGROUND: Extensive clinical investigations are mandatory to evaluate the safety and reactogenicity of vaccines. The recording of common adverse events like injection site soreness or general discomfort derives from individual subjective perceptions. Thermal imaging at the injection site possibly provides a non-subjective and a non-invasive approach to supplement this evaluation. RESULTS: A protocol for quantified injection-site infrared imaging included 86 participants during a flu vaccine campaign, 40% of whom had a thermal reaction of 1 °C; 25-30% had no thermal response. There was little subjective pain reporting and no clinical correlations were observed except with post-vaccination erythema. Higher responses were linked with advanced age and multiple previous vaccinations. CONCLUSION: Evan if influenza vaccine was only moderately reactogenic, a thermal response was detectable in about 70% of vaccinees, though no relationship to reactogenicity was seen. Infrared imaging might however be a prospective tool for individual studies of vaccine-induced vascular responses. PMID: 29653847 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]