Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)

TENS - an alternative to antiviral drugs for acute herpes zoster treatment and postherpetic neuralgia prevention.

Abstract Title: TENS - an alternative to antiviral drugs for acute herpes zoster treatment and postherpetic neuralgia prevention. Abstract Source: Swiss Med Wkly. 2012 ;141:w13229. Epub 2012 Jan 17. PMID: 22250036 Abstract Author(s): M Kolsek Article Affiliation: Department of family medicine, Medical faculty, University of Ljubljana, Poljanski nasip 58, 1000 Ljubljana, SI. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.;This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Abstract: QUESTIONS UNDER STUDY: To evaluate the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in treatment of Herpes zoster (HZ), and prevention of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) compared with antiviral drugs. PHN is frequent complication of HZ and may last for months, its treatment isn't very successful. Nonpharmacological regimens for treatment of HZ and prevention of PHN haven't been evaluated. METHODS: Retrospective observational study of medical records of patients of three family physicians in Health centre Litija, Slovenia was done. 109 of 6613 patients on their lists had HZ from 1999 to 2008. 102 medical records were analyzed (6 could not be reached; one patient with corneal HZ was excluded). RESULTS: Four treatment groups were compared: only TENS therapy, only antiviral drug, antiviral drug and TENS, no therapy (neither antiviral drug or TENS). All groups were similar with respect to demographic characteristics of patients with HZ. Patients treated only with TENS had no PHN, 28.6% of patients treated with antiviral drugs had PHN. Less analgesic drugs have been prescribed to patients treated only with TENS. CONCLUSION: Study suggests TENS may be safe adjunct or even alternative to antiviral drugs for treatment of acute HZ. It looks that TENS may be at least as good as antiviral drugs for treatment of HZ, and it may be better in reducing and preventing PHN - such conclusion would necessitate controlled, prospective study. Use of TENS provided pain relief and resolution of skin lesions with no higher rate of other HZ complications compared to antiviral therapy. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2012

Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on symptomatic diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Abstract Title: Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on symptomatic diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Abstract Source: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2010 Jul;89(1):10-5. Epub 2010 May 26. PMID: 20510476 Abstract Author(s): Dong-mei Jin, Yun Xu, Deng-feng Geng, Tie-bin Yan Article Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou, PR China. Abstract: AIMS: To evaluate the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). METHODS: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TENS with routine care, pharmacological interventions or placebo devices on patients with symptomatic DPN, were identified by electronic and manual searches. Studies were selected and available data were extracted independently by two investigators. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 4.2.8 software. RESULTS: Three RCTs involving 78 patients were included in this study. The reductions in mean pain score were significantly greater in TENS group than in placebo TENS group in 4 weeks and 6 weeks follow-up [4 weeks, SMD-5.37, 95% CI (-6.97, -3.77); 6 weeks, SMD-1.01, 95% CI (-2.01, -0.01)], but not in 12 weeks follow-up [SMD-1.65, 95% CI (-4.02, 0.73)]. TENS therapy was associated with significantly subjective improvement in overall neuropathic symptoms in 12 weeks follow-up [WMD-0.18, 95% CI (-0.32, -0.051)]. No TENS-related adverse events were registered in TENS group. CONCLUSIONS: TENS therapy may be an effective and safe strategy in treatment of symptomatic DPN. Due to small sample and short-term treatment duration, large multi-centre RCTs are needed to further evaluate the long-term effect of TENS on DPN. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2010

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation versus oral analgesic: a randomized double-blind controlled study in acute traumatic pain.

Abstract Title: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation versus oral analgesic: a randomized double-blind controlled study in acute traumatic pain. Abstract Source: J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Jan 12. Epub 2010 Jan 12. PMID: 3545246 Abstract Author(s): G J Ordog Abstract: A double-blind controlled analgesic study was undertaken in outpatients suffering acute traumatic pain. One hundred patients completed the study and were randomly assigned to four treatment groups, each receiving either functioning transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS), placebo TENS, acetaminophen with codeine and a functioning TENS, or acetaminophen with codeine and a placebo TENS. Pain was assessed prior to treatment, at 48 hours, and at one month using a visual analog scale. A statistically significant difference in pain relief occurred between the placebo and functioning TENS groups. The TENS was approximately as effective as acetaminophen (300-600 mg) with codeine (30-60 mg) but had no side effects. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators have been shown to be effective in the management of acute traumatic pain and may be indicated for patients who cannot be given medications. Article Published Date : Jan 12, 2010

Efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in children with overactive bladder refractory to pharmacotherapy.

Abstract Title: Efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in children with overactive bladder refractory to pharmacotherapy. Abstract Source: Urology. 2007 Nov;70(5):980-3. Epub 2007 Oct 24. PMID: 17919697 Abstract Author(s): Elizabeth Malm-Buatsi, Kenneth G Nepple, Margaret A Boyt, J Christopher Austin, Christopher S Cooper Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To examine the outcome of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) use in children with overactive bladder refractory to behavioral and anticholinergic therapy. METHODS: We reviewed the data of 18 children (13 girls and 5 boys; mean age 9 years) with overactive bladder refractory to standard therapy who underwent at-home TENS treatment twice daily for 20 minutes. Symptoms and objective measures (noninvasive uroflowmetry and postvoid residual urine volume) were noted at baseline and after treatment. RESULTS: Of the 18 children, 15 had pretreatment incontinence and 3 had only increased urgency/frequency. The incontinence group averaged 3.2 +/- 2.1 daytime accidents. The mean length of TENS use was 8 +/- 7 months, and the mean follow-up after starting TENS was 13 +/- 9 months. Of the 15 patients with incontinence, 2 became dry (13%), 9 were significantly improved (60%), and 4 reported no improvement (27%). Of 12 children with marked urinary frequency, 8 had significant symptom improvement. Noninvasive uroflow and postvoid residual urine volume measurements were not significantly different statistically before and after treatment. Pretreatment patient sex, age, and frequency of wetting were not predictive of the outcome. A post-TENS parabolic uroflow curve showed a statistically significant correlation with patients who became dry or improved (P = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study have indicated that TENS use in children with incontinence refractory to pharmacotherapy is safe and well tolerated. The encouraging results of this treatment modality in the refractory patient population warrant additional study of the pediatric overactive bladder. Article Published Date : Nov 01, 2007

Trigeminal neuralgia: sudden and long-term remission with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

Abstract Title: Trigeminal neuralgia: sudden and long-term remission with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Abstract Source: J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1997 Jul-Aug;20(6):415-9. PMID: 9272474 Abstract Author(s): S W Thorsen, S G Lumsden Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To discuss a case of trigeminal neuralgia that responded to an accidental high-intensity discharge of electrical current delivered by a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator (TENS). CLINICAL FEATURES: A 36-yr-old man suffering from a 5-month history of worsening paroxysmal pain of the left facial and temporal regions was referred to a neurologist by his family physician. A clinical diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia was made; before committing to pharmaceutical treatment, however, the patient sought chiropractic consultation. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: A trial of self-applied TENS was recommended for pain control. Initial application to patient tolerance provided transient pain relief until an accidental, intense discharge resulted in immediate remission of symptoms, lasting now for three years. CONCLUSION: As an initial treatment of choice, TENS can be a safe and effective therapy for trigeminal neuralgia. The unique effect of this accidental application leads us to speculate that diffuse noxious inhibitory controls may have been the pain inhibitory pathway responsible for the resolution of symptoms in this case. Although firm conclusions are difficult to draw from one incident, using TENS at an intense, noxious level may improve its therapeutic efficacy by decreasing treatment time and frequency and eliciting long-lasting effects. This case suggests the need for further investigation of TENS in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia and related pain syndromes. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 1997

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and temporary S3 neuromodulation in idiopathic detrusor instability.

Abstract Title: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and temporary S3 neuromodulation in idiopathic detrusor instability. Abstract Source: J Urol. 1996 Jun;155(6):2005-11. PMID: 8618309 Abstract Author(s): S T Hasan, W A Robson, A K Pridie, D E Neal Article Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Medical School, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, England. Abstract: PURPOSE: We studied the effects of electrical stimulation on idiopathic detrusor instability. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 1993 and December 1994, 30 men and 41 women (mean age plus or minus standard deviation 48 +/- 16 years) underwent transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of the S2-S3 dermatomes, and 13 men and 22 women (mean age 48 +/- 12 years) underwent S3 neuromodulation. Subjective assessment was performed using a diary and symptom score of 0 to 14. Objective outcome was analyzed with urodynamic studies. RESULTS: Mean duration of TENS was 3 +/- 1 weeks (range 2 to 4). Although there were no major complications 31% of the patients reported local skin irritation. The overall urinary symptom scores improved from 10 +/- 2 (range 5 to 14) before the study to 7 +/- 3 (range 1 to 14) during stimulation. Urodynamic analysis revealed significant (p<0.05) improvements in total bladder capacity and voided volume, and decreases in the number and frequency of unstable contractions. Mean duration of S3 neuromodulation was 6 +/- 1 days (range 4 to 8 days). Four procedures failed due to electrode displacement in 3 cases and procedure intolerance in 1. Hemorrhage from the puncture site occurred in 1 patient. Overall urinary symptom scores were 10 +/- 3 (range 5 to 14) before the study and 5 +/- 2 (range 2 to 10) during stimulation. Although symptomatic relief was more pronounced with S3 neuromodulation, no statistically significant differences were found regarding urinary symptoms compared to TENS. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with severe detrusor instability refractory to conservative treatments the use of TENS and S3 neuromodulation produced significant changes in urodynamic parameters and presenting symptoms. Our results appear to justify evaluation with neuromodulatory techniques before definitive surgical intervention in these patients. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 1996

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after cesarean birth.

Abstract Title: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after cesarean birth. Abstract Source: Phys Ther. 1986 Jan;66(1):36-8. PMID: 3484553 Abstract Author(s): J L Hollinger Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine if women who had Cesarean birth experiences and used transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation as a means of pain control requested less pain medication and had shorter hospital stays than those who did not use TENS. I reviewed the medical charts of 72 women (46 using TENS, 26 not using TENS) retrospectively. Significantly less (F = 5.77; df = 1,65; p less than .02) meperidine hydrochloride was administered to the women who used TENS. The length of hospital stay of women using TENS was not significantly different than those who did not use TENS. My findings suggest that the use of TENS after Cesarean birth may result in decreased usage of medication and, therefore, a reduction of the side effects of the medication both to the mother and the infant. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 1986
Therapeutic Actions Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)

NCBI pubmed

KCC2-GABAA pathway correlates with the analgesic effect of electro-acupuncture in CCI rats.

Related Articles KCC2-GABAA pathway correlates with the analgesic effect of electro-acupuncture in CCI rats. Mol Med Rep. 2018 May;17(5):6961-6968 Authors: Li SS, Tu WZ, Jia CQ, Jiang X, Qian XR, Yang GH, Hu QM, Chen WC, Lu B, Jiang SH Abstract Potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2) has been indicated to serve a crucial role during chronic neuropathic pain (NP). Following the emergence of NP, γ‑aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor‑mediated signaling may be further impaired by the changes of KCC2 chloride anion gradient. In the present study, the authors investigate the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on the behavior and the expression of KCC2 and GABAA receptor γ2 subunit in the spinal cord of chronic constriction injury (CCI) model rats. A total of 60 adult male Sprague‑Dawley rats were divided into four groups: Normal group, sham‑CCI group, CCI group and CCI+EA group. The effect of EA was assessed via the values of mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency, which were significantly improved upon stimulation of the ST‑36 and GB‑34 acupoints. In addition, a marked reduction in both the mRNA and protein levels of KCC2 and GABAA receptor γ2 subunit was observed in the spinal cord following loose ligation of the sciatic nerve. The reductions in KCC2 and GABAA receptor γ2 subunit expression were reversed by EA treatment. These results support the notion that KCC2 and GABAA receptor γ2 subunit contribute to NP following peripheral nerve injury and extend the understanding of the analgesic effects of EA on NP. PMID: 29568893 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]