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Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Yogic Breathing

Vagal Mediation of Low Frequency Heart Rate Variability During Slow Yogic Breathing.

Abstract Title: Vagal Mediation of Low Frequency Heart Rate Variability During Slow Yogic Breathing. Abstract Source: Psychosom Med. 2018 May 16. Epub 2018 May 16. PMID: 29771730 Abstract Author(s): Bryan W Kromenacker, Anna A Sanova, Frank I Marcus, John J B Allen, Richard D Lane Article Affiliation: Bryan W Kromenacker Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Changes in heart rate variability (HRV) associated with breathing (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]) are known to be parasympathetically (vagally) mediated when the breathing rate is within the typical frequency range (9-24 breaths/min; high frequency HRV). Slow yogic breathing occurs at rates below this range and increases low frequency HRV power, which may additionally reflect a significant sympathetic component. Yogic breathing techniques are hypothesized to confer health benefits by increasing cardiac vagal control, but increases in low frequency HRV power cannot unambiguously distinguish sympathetic from parasympathetic contributions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the autonomic origins of changes in low frequency HRV power due to slow paced breathing. METHODS: Six healthy young adults completed slow paced breathing with a cadence derived from yogic breathing patterns. The paced breathing took place under conditions of sympathetic blockade, parasympathetic (vagal) blockade, and placebo. HRV spectral power was compared under eleven breathing rates during each session, in counterbalanced order with frequencies spanning the low frequency range (4 to 9 breaths/minute). RESULTS: HRV power across the low frequency range (4-9 breaths per minute) was nearly eliminated (p=0.016) by parasympathetic blockade (mean spectral power at breathing frequency (SD) = 4.1(2.1)) compared to placebo (69.5(8.1)). In contrast, spectral power during sympathetic blockade 70.2(9.1) and placebo (69.5(8.1)) were statistically indistinguishable (p=0.671). CONCLUSIONS: These findings clarify the interpretation of changes in HRV that occur during slow paced breathing by showing that changes in low frequency power under these conditions are almost entirely vagally-mediated. Slow paced breathing is an effective tool for cardiac vagal activation. Article Published Date : May 15, 2018

Effect of Yogic Breathing on Accommodate Braille Version of Six-letter Cancellation Test in Students with Visual Impairment. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of Yogic Breathing on Accommodate Braille Version of Six-letter Cancellation Test in Students with Visual Impairment. Abstract Source: Int J Yoga. 2018 May-Aug;11(2):111-115. PMID: 29755219 Abstract Author(s): Balaram Pradhan, Soubhagyalaxmi Mohanty, Alex Hankey Article Affiliation: Balaram Pradhan Abstract: Context: Attentional processes tend to be less well developed in the visually impaired, who require special training to develop them fully. Yogic breathing which alters the patterns of respiration has been shown to enhance attention skills. Letter cancellation tests are well-established tools to measure attention and attention span. Here, a modified Braille version of the six-letter cancellation test (SLCT) was used for students with visual impairment (VI). Aim: This study aimed to assess the immediate effects of(BhPr) and breath awareness (BA) on students with VI. Methods: This study was a self-as-control study held on 2 consecutive days, on 19 participants (8 males, 11 females), with a mean age of 15.89± 1.59 years, randomized into two groups. On the 1day, Group 1 performed 10 min breath awareness and Group 2 performed; on the 2day, practices were reversed. Assessments used a SLCT specially adapted for the visually impaired before and after each session. Results: The Braille letter cancellation test was successfully taken by 19 students. Scores significantly improved after both techniques for each student following practices on both days (<0.001). BhPr may have more effect on attention performance than BA as wrong scores significantly increased following BA (<0.05), but the increase in the score afterwas not significant. Conclusions: Despite the small sample size improvement in attentional processes by both yoga breathing techniques was robust. Attentional skills were definitely enhanced. Long-term practice should be studied. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2018

Controlled Rhythmic Yogic Breathing as Complementary Treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Military Veterans: A Case Series. 📎

Abstract Title: Controlled Rhythmic Yogic Breathing as Complementary Treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Military Veterans: A Case Series. Abstract Source: Med Acupunct. 2017 Aug 1 ;29(4):232-238. PMID: 28874925 Abstract Author(s): Joseph Walker, Deborah Pacik Article Affiliation: Joseph Walker Abstract: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a cluster of symptoms in which a person persistently relives a traumatic event, through recurring thoughts, nightmares, and flashbacks for at least 1 month or more. There are various behavioral and medical treatment options for PTSD. Mind-body techniques, such as biofeedback and breathing-based stress reduction, have shown some promise in the treatment of PTSD symptoms. The purpose of this case series was to examine controlled yogic breathing as a complementary treatment of PTSD in military veterans. A retrospective review was performed from 2012 to 2016 in 3 cases, and participant demographics, member statements, and PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M) scores, pre-and-post course, were extracted.Three military veterans with PTSD participated in a standardized 5-day course designed to teach them controlled rhythmic yogic breathing exercises.Subjectively, all 3 participants reported a decrease in PTSD symptoms after the course. Objectively, all 3 participants had a reduction in their overall PCL-M scores after the course. Among all 3 participants, there were score decreases in the Avoidance and Increased Arousal categories. The most dramatic improvement occurred in the participant with the most severe symptoms.Controlled yogic breathing, specifically(SKY), appeared to reduce the symptoms of PTSD in 3 veterans of the Armed Services. Article Published Date : Jul 31, 2017

Yogic breathing practices improve lung functions of competitive young swimmers. 📎

Abstract Title: Yogic breathing practices improve lung functions of competitive young swimmers. Abstract Source: J Ayurveda Integr Med. 2017 Apr - Jun;8(2):99-104. PMID: 28601355 Abstract Author(s): Chirag Sunil Hakked, Ragavendrasamy Balakrishnan, Manjunath Nandi Krishnamurthy Article Affiliation: Chirag Sunil Hakked Abstract: BACKGROUND: Resistive breathing practices are known to improve endurance and performance in competitive swimmers. However, the effect of Pranayama or Yogic Breathing Practices (YBP) in improving respiratory endurance and performance of competitive swimmers remains un-investigated. OBJECTIVES: To study effects of yogic breathing practices on lung functions of swimmers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty seven national and international competitive swimmers of the age range 13-20 years, with 8.29 ± 2.9 years of competitive swimming experience and practicing swimming for 9.58 ± 1.81 km everyday, were assigned randomly to either an experimental (YBP) or to wait list control group (no intervention). Outcome measures were taken on day 1 and day 30 and included (1) spirometry to measure lung function, (2) Sport Anxiety Scale-2 (SAS-2) to measure the antecedents and consequences of cognitive and somatic trait anxiety of sport performance and (3) number of strokes per breath to measure performance. The YBP group practiced a prescribed set of Yogic Breathing Practices - Sectional Breathing (Vibhagiya Pranayama), Yogic Bellows Breathing (Bhastrika Pranayama) and Alternate Nostril Breathing with Voluntary Internal Breath Holding (Nadi Shodhana with Anthar kumbhaka) for half an hour, five days a week for one month. RESULTS: There was a significant improvement in the YBP group as compared to control group in maximal voluntary ventilation (p = 0.038), forced vital capacity (p = 0.026) and number of strokes per breath (p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that YBP helps to enhance respiratory endurance in competitive swimmers. Article Published Date : May 31, 2017

Beneficial Effects of Yogasanas and Pranayama in limiting the Cognitive decline in Type 2 Diabetes. 📎

Abstract Title: Beneficial Effects of Yogasanas and Pranayama in limiting the Cognitive decline in Type 2 Diabetes. Abstract Source: Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. 2017 ;7(3):232-235. Epub 2016 Sep 24. PMID: 28299348 Abstract Author(s): Santhakumari Rajani, Rajagopalan Archana, Yogananda Reddy Indla, P Rajesh Article Affiliation: Santhakumari Rajani Abstract: BACKGROUND: Out of many complications that were observed in type 2 diabetes, cognitive impairment is the most neglected. AIM AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study is to assess the cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes and to observe the role of yogasanas and pranayama in ameliorating the cognitive decline. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty eight type 2 diabetic subjects were recruited in the study, 34 of them did specific yogasanas and pranayama (test group) for six months and the remaining age and sex matched 34 subjects were recruited as (control group) who were not on any specific exercise regimen. Glycaemic index was estimated by measuring the glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration with Bio-Rad apparatus and cognition was assessed by using Addenbrook's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R), which is a neuropsychological battery. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data was analysed with unpaired student t test. P value<0.05 is considered as statistically significant. Validity was assessed by receiver operating characteristics. RESULTS: Analysis of data indicated more cognitive scores in the test group when compared with the control group. In test group six months practice of yogasanas and pranayama has also significantly brought down the high glycaemic values which were observed in the control group. CONCLUSION: These findings allow the study to conclude that regular practice of yogasanas and pranayama has a beneficial effect on cognitive performance in type 2 diabetic subjects by stabilizing blood glucose. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2016

Can yoga therapy stimulate stem cell trafficking from bone marrow? 📎

Abstract Title: Can yoga therapy stimulate stem cell trafficking from bone marrow? Abstract Source: J Ayurveda Integr Med. 2016 Jul - Sep;7(3):181-184. Epub 2016 Sep 17. PMID: 27649634 Abstract Author(s): Nitya Shree, Ramesh R Bhonde Article Affiliation: Nitya Shree Abstract: It has been established that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from bone marrow enter the peripheral circulation intermittently for possible tissue regeneration, repair and to take care of daily wear and tear. This is evident from the detection of MSCs from peripheral blood. The factors governing this migration remain elusive. These MSCs carry out the work of policing and are supposed to repair the injured tissues. Thus, these cells help in maintaining the tissue and organ homeostasis. Yoga and pranayama originated in India and is now being practiced all over the world for positive health. So far, the chemical stimulation of bone marrow has been widely used employing injection of colony stimulating factor. However, the role of physical factors such as mechanical stimulation and stretching has not been substantiated. It is claimed that practicing yoga delays senescence, improves the physiological functions of heart and lung and yoga postures make the body elastic. It remains to be seen whether the yoga therapy promotes trafficking of the stem cells from bone marrow for possible repair and regeneration of worn out and degenerating tissues. We cover in this short review, mainly the role of physical factors especially the yoga therapy on stem cells trafficking from bone marrow. Article Published Date : Aug 31, 2016

Yogic breathing when compared to attention control reduces the levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers in saliva: a pilot randomized controlled trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Yogic breathing when compared to attention control reduces the levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers in saliva: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2016 Aug 18 ;16:294. Epub 2016 Aug 18. PMID: 27538513 Abstract Author(s): Waleed O Twal, Amy E Wahlquist, Sundaravadivel Balasubramanian Article Affiliation: Waleed O Twal Abstract: BACKGROUND: Self-report measures indicate that Yoga practices are perceived to reduce stress; however, molecular mechanisms through which YB affects stress are just beginning to be understood. While invasive sampling such as blood has been widely used to measure biological indicators such as pro-inflammatory biomarkers, the use of saliva to measure changes in various biomolecules has been increasingly recognized. As Yoga practice stimulates salivary secretion, and saliva is considered a source of biomarkers, changes in salivary cytokines before and after Yogic breathing exercise as specified in an ancient Tamil script, Thirumanthiram, were examined using a Cytokine Multiplex to compare to Attention Control (AC) group. METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers were randomized into two groups stratified by gender (N = 10 per YB and AC groups); The YB group performed two YB exercises, each for ten minutes, for a total of twenty minutes in a single session as directed by a trained Yoga instructor. The AC group read a text of their choice for 20 min. Saliva was collected immediately after YB training at 0, 5,10, 15 and 20 min and analyzed by Multiplex enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). RESULTS: The levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein -1 (MCP-1) were significantly reduced in YB group when compared to AC group. The level of reduction of IL-8 was significant at all time points tested, whereas IL-1β showed reduction at 15 and 20 min time points (p < 0.05), and MCP-1 level was marginally different at 5-20 min. There were no significant differences between YB and AC groups in the salivary levels of IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IP-10, MIP-1b, and TNF-α. CONCLUSIONS: These data are the first to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting salivary cytokines using multiplex assay in response to a Yoga practice. This study was registered in Clinical Trials.gov # NCT02108769. Article Published Date : Aug 17, 2016

Immediate Effects of Bhramari Pranayama on Resting Cardiovascular Parameters in Healthy Adolescents. 📎

Abstract Title: Immediate Effects of Bhramari Pranayama on Resting Cardiovascular Parameters in Healthy Adolescents. Abstract Source: J Clin Diagn Res. 2016 May ;10(5):CC17-9. Epub 2016 May 1. PMID: 27437210 Abstract Author(s): Maheshkumar Kuppusamy, Dilara Kamaldeen, Ravishankar Pitani, Julius Amaldas Article Affiliation: Maheshkumar Kuppusamy Abstract: INTRODUCTION: In yoga, Pranayama has a very important role in maintaining sound health. There is some strong scientific basis on constant physiological changes produced when pranayama is practiced for long duration. Still, there exists a dearth of literature on the effect of Bhramari pranayama (Bhr.p) on physiological systems. AIM: To assess the immediate effect of Bhramari pranayama (Bhr.P) practice on the resting cardiovascular parameters in healthy adolescents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty apparently healthy adolescents of both sex participated in the study. They were randomly divided into Bhr.P (n-30) and control (n-30) group. Informed consent was obtained after explaining the detailed procedure of the study. Bhr.P group practiced Bhramari pranayama for 45 min (5 cycles) and control group was allowed to do normal breathing (12-16 breath /min). Heart rate (HR) was assessed by radial artery palpation method and blood pressure was recorded in supine position after 5 minutes of rest by sphygmomanometer. RESULTS: The HR reduced significantly (p-0.001) in Bhr.P group. BP indices, Pulse Pressure (PP), Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), Rate Pressure Product (RPP) and Double Product (DoP) significantly decreased after Bhr.p practice compared with control. Pre and Post inter group analysis also showed that significant reduction in HR and BP indices in Bhr.P group. CONCLUSION: Present study showed that Bhr.P practice produces relaxed state and in this state parasympathetic activity overrides the sympathetic activity. It suggests that Bhramari pranayama improves the resting cardiovascular parameters in healthy adolescents. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2016

Alternate Nostril Breathing at Different Rates and its Influence on Heart Rate Variability in Non Practitioners of Yoga. 📎

Abstract Title: Alternate Nostril Breathing at Different Rates and its Influence on Heart Rate Variability in Non Practitioners of Yoga. Abstract Source: J Clin Diagn Res. 2016 Jan ;10(1):CM01-2. Epub 2016 Jan 1. PMID: 26894062 Abstract Author(s): Rajam Krishna Subramanian, Devaki P R, Saikumar P Article Affiliation: Rajam Krishna Subramanian Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Heart rate variability is a measure of modulation in autonomic input to the heart and is one of the markers of autonomic functions. Though there are many studies on the long term influence of breathing on HRV (heart rate variability) there are only a few studies on the immediate effect of breathing especially alternate nostril breathing on HRV. This study focuses on the immediate effects of alternate nostril breathing and the influence of different breathing rates on HRV. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was done on 25 subjects in the age group of 17-35 years. ECG and respiration were recorded before intervention and immediately after the subjects were asked to perform alternate nostril breathing for five minutes. RESULTS: Low frequency (LF) which is a marker of sympathetic activity increased, high frequency (HF) which is a marker of parasympathetic activity decreased and their ratio LF/HF which is a marker of sympatho/vagal balance increased immediately after 6 and 12 minutes in comparison to baseline values whereas there was no significant difference in the means of these components when both 6 and 12 minutes were compared. CONCLUSION: Immediate effects of alternate nostril breathing on HRV in non practitioners of yogic breathing are very different from the long term influence of yogic breathing on HRV which show a predominant parasympathetic influence on the heart. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2015

Alterations in Salivary Proteome following Single Twenty-Minute Session of Yogic Breathing. 📎

Abstract Title: Alterations in Salivary Proteome following Single Twenty-Minute Session of Yogic Breathing. Abstract Source: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015 ;2015:376029. Epub 2015 Mar 19. PMID: 25873979 Abstract Author(s): Sundaravadivel Balasubramanian, Michael G Janech, Graham W Warren Article Affiliation: Sundaravadivel Balasubramanian Abstract: Yogic breathing (YB) has been suggested to reduce stress and blood pressure and increase cognitive processes. However, alterations after YB at the molecular level are not well established. Twenty healthy volunteers were randomized into two groups (N = 10 per group): YB or attention controls (AC). The YB group performed two YB exercises, each for ten minutes, for a total of twenty minutes in a single session. AC group read a text of their choice for 20 minutes. Saliva was collected at baseline and at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes. Using Mass Spectrometry (MS), we initially found that 22 proteins were differentially expressed and then validated deleted in malignant brain tumor-1 (DMBT1) and Ig lambda-2 chain C region (IGLC2) using Western Blotting. DMBT1 was elevated in 7 of YB group by 10-fold and 11-fold at 10 and 15 minutes, respectively, whereas it was undetectable in the time-matched AC group (P<0.05). There was a significant interaction between groups and time assessed by two-way ANOVA (P<0.001). IGLC2 also showed a significant increase in YB group as measured by Western Blotting. These data are the first to demonstrate the feasibility of stimulating and detecting salivary protein biomarkers in response to an acute Yoga exercise. This trial is registered with ClincalTrials.gov NCT02108769. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2014

Effect of yogic breathing techniques in new sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of yogic breathing techniques in new sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis. Abstract Source: Int J Prev Med. 2014 Jun ;5(6):787-90. PMID: 25013700 Abstract Author(s): A Mooventhan, Vitthal Khode, L Nivethitha Article Affiliation: A Mooventhan Abstract: A 24-year-old, unmarried woman diagnosed of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) visited our hospital out-patient department in the month of August-2013. Patient came with the complaint of sever cough with expectoration; evening raise of temperature; gradual loss of appetite and weight since 2-weeks. We referred the patient to our hospital's Revised National Tuberculosis Program, direct observed treatment short-course center for sputum fluorescence microscopic examination (FME). FME report suggested the new smear positive, 2+ PTB. Our patient received yogic breathing techniques (YBT) for 45-min daily under the supervision for three alternate-days/week with anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT) for the period of 8-weeks. After intervention our result showed better improvement in weight gain, body mass index, symptom scores, pulmonary function and health related quality of life with conversion of positive to negative FME for acid fast bacilli. It suggests YBT with ATT are effective in treating PTB and further studies required to warrant this effect. Article Published Date : May 31, 2014

The influence of the 2:1 yogic breathing technique on essential hypertension.

Abstract Title: The influence of the 2:1 yogic breathing technique on essential hypertension. Abstract Source: Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2013 Jan-Mar;57(1):38-44. PMID: 24020097 Abstract Author(s): Ritu Adhana, Rani Gupta, Jyoti Dvivedii, Sohaib Ahmad Article Affiliation: Ritu Adhana Abstract: In 2:1 breathing exhalation is twice of inhalation. The study was performed to study the influence of 2:1 yogic breathing technique on patients of essential hypertension. 30 patients of essential hypertension between ages of 20-50 years were selected. After a rest of 15-20 minutes in a comfortable sitting posture their baseline physiological parameters recorded on a digital polygraph were, Electromyogram (EMG), Galvanic skin response (GSR), Finger tip temperature (FTT), Heart rate(HR) and Respiratory rate(RR). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were recorded by automated digital Sphygmomanometer. Then they were guided to do 2:1 breathing maintaining respiratory rate of around 6/min. Subjects were then instructed to do 2:1 breathing twice a day for 5-7 minutes for next 3 months. Subjects reported back weekly for recording of BP. The physiological parameters of the subjects were assessed again by polygraph at the end of three months of practicing 2:1 yogic breathing. The mean fall of SBP over 12 weeks was 12 mm Hg (8%) and DBP was 7 mm Hg (7%). P value<0.001 in both. After practicing 2:1 breathing for 3 months there was statistically significant reduction of SBP, DBP, HR RR, EMG, GSR and rise in FTT. The study showed that 2:1 breathing technique caused a comprehensive change in body physiology by altering various parameters that are governed by the autonomic nervous system. It is an effective modality for management of essential hypertension. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2012

Effect of yoga practices on pulmonary function tests including transfer factor of lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO) in asthma patients.

Abstract Title: Effect of yoga practices on pulmonary function tests including transfer factor of lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO) in asthma patients. Abstract Source: Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2012 Jan-Mar;56(1):63-8. PMID: 23029966 Abstract Author(s): Savita Singh, Ritu Soni, K P Singh, O P Tandon Article Affiliation: Department of Physiology, University College of Medical Sciences&Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital, Dilshad Garden, Delhi, India. Abstract: Prana is the energy, when the self-energizing force embraces the body with extension and expansion and control, it is pranayama. It may affect the milieu at the bronchioles and the alveoli particularly at the alveolo-capillary membrane to facilitate diffusion and transport of gases. It may also increase oxygenation at tissue level. Aim of our study is to compare pulmonary functions and diffusion capacity in patients of bronchial asthma before and after yogic intervention of 2 months. Sixty stable asthmatic-patients were randomized into two groups i.e group 1 (Yoga training group) and group 2 (control group). Each group included thirty patients. Lung functions were recorded on all patients at baseline, and then after two months. Group 1 subjects showed a statistically significant improvement (P<0.001) in Transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1st sec (FEV1), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) and slow vital capacity (SVC) after yoga practice. Quality of life also increased significantly. It was concluded that pranayama&yoga breathing and stretching postures are used to increase respiratory stamina, relax the chest muscles, expand the lungs, raise energy levels, and calm the body. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2011

Immediate effect of a slow pace breathing exercise Bhramari pranayama on blood pressure and heart rate.

Abstract Title: Immediate effect of a slow pace breathing exercise Bhramari pranayama on blood pressure and heart rate. Abstract Source: Nepal Med Coll J. 2010 Sep ;12(3):154-7. PMID: 21446363 Abstract Author(s): T Pramanik, B Pudasaini, R Prajapati Article Affiliation: T Pramanik Abstract: The study was carried out to evaluate the immediate effect Bhramari pranayama, a slow breathing exercise for 5 minutes on heart rate and blood pressure. Heart rate and blood pressure of volunteers were recorded. The subject was directed to inhale slowly up to the maximum for about 5 seconds and then to exhale slowly up to the maximum for about 15 sec keeping two thumbs on two external auditory canal, index and middle finger together on two closed eyes and ring finger on the two sides of the nose. During exhalation the subject must chant the word"O-U-Mmmma"with a humming nasal sound mimicking the sound of a humming wasp, so that the laryngeal walls and the inner walls of the nostril mildly vibrate (Bhramari pranayama, respiratory rate 3/min). After 5 minutes of this exercise, the blood pressure and heart rate were recorded again. Both the systolic and diastolic blood pressure were found to be'decreased with a slight fall in heart rate. Fall of diastolic pressure and mean pressure were significant. The result indicated that slow pace Bhramari pranayama for 5 minutes, induced parasympathetic dominance on cardiovascular system. Article Published Date : Aug 31, 2010

Effect of two breathing exercises (Buteyko and pranayama) in asthma: a randomised controlled trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of two breathing exercises (Buteyko and pranayama) in asthma: a randomised controlled trial. Abstract Source: Phytother Res. 2009 Dec 2. PMID: 12885982 Abstract Author(s): S Cooper, J Oborne, S Newton, V Harrison, J Thompson Coon, S Lewis, A Tattersfield Article Affiliation: Division of Respiratory Medicine, City Hospital, Nottingham NG5 1PB, UK. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Patients with asthma are interested in the use of breathing exercises but their role is uncertain. The effects of the Buteyko breathing technique, a device which mimics pranayama (a yoga breathing technique), and a dummy pranayama device on bronchial responsiveness and symptoms were compared over 6 months in a parallel group study. METHODS: Ninety patients with asthma taking an inhaled corticosteroid were randomised after a 2 week run in period to Eucapnic Buteyko breathing, use of a Pink City Lung Exerciser (PCLE) to mimic pranayama, or a PCLE placebo device. Subjects practised the techniques at home twice daily for 6 months followed by an optional steroid reduction phase. Primary outcome measures were symptom scores and change in the dose of methacholine provoking a 20% fall in FEV(1) (PD(20)) during the first 6 months. RESULTS: Sixty nine patients (78%) completed the study. There was no significant difference in PD(20) between the three groups at 3 or 6 months. Symptoms remained relatively stable in the PCLE and placebo groups but were reduced in the Buteyko group. Median change in symptom scores at 6 months was 0 (interquartile range -1 to 1) in the placebo group, -1 (-2 to 0.75) in the PCLE group, and -3 (-4 to 0) in the Buteyko group (p=0.003 for difference between groups). Bronchodilator use was reduced in the Buteyko group by two puffs/day at 6 months; there was no change in the other two groups (p=0.005). No difference was seen between the groups in FEV(1), exacerbations, or ability to reduce inhaled corticosteroids. CONCLUSION: The Buteyko breathing technique can improve symptoms and reduce bronchodilator use but does not appear to change bronchial responsiveness or lung function in patients with asthma. No benefit was shown for the Pink City Lung Exerciser. Article Published Date : Dec 02, 2009
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Therapeutic Actions Yogic Breathing

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Experiences of hatha yogic exercises among patients with obstructive pulmonary diseases: A qualitative study.

Related Articles Experiences of hatha yogic exercises among patients with obstructive pulmonary diseases: A qualitative study. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2018 Oct;22(4):896-903 Authors: Papp ME, Henriques M, Biguet G, Wändell PE, Nygren-Bonnier M Abstract BACKGROUND AND AIM: Obstructive pulmonary diseases can involve dyspnea and deconditioning. Hatha yogic exercises are a form of psychophysical attention-based activity. Research of experiences after participating in an adapted hatha yoga (YE) intervention remains limited. The aim of the present study was to explore the experiences of patients with obstructive pulmonary diseases (asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) in a 12-week hatha yoga intervention (YE). METHOD: Fifteen patients (10 women and 5 men, median age = 61, range: 44-76 years) who had participated in YE were interviewed after the intervention. Interview data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: Three main categories emerged: "To focus and be aware of oneself", "To gain new knowledge through practice" and "To master one's own situation". The overall theme "From limitation to opportunity - to experience breathing as a tool in daily life" illustrates a learning process on different levels. The participants described improved physical symptoms and breathing techniques, greater energy/stamina and body awareness along with a new sense of control over their breathing in different situations. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with obstructive pulmonary diseases may strengthen their self-awareness and improve control of symptoms and learning new ways of breathing after practicing YE, which may provide a tool to control disease symptoms in daily life. Trial registration number NCT02233114. PMID: 30368332 [PubMed - in process]
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