CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Applied Kinesiology

Symptomatic Arnold-Chiari malformation and cranial nerve dysfunction: a case study of applied kinesiology cranial evaluation and treatment.

Abstract Title: Symptomatic Arnold-Chiari malformation and cranial nerve dysfunction: a case study of applied kinesiology cranial evaluation and treatment. Abstract Source: J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2005 May;28(4):e1-6. PMID: 15883570 Abstract Author(s): Scott Cuthbert, Charles Blum Article Affiliation: Chiropractic Health Center, Pueblo, CO 81004, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To present an overview of possible effects of Arnold-Chiari malformation (ACM) and to offer chiropractic approaches and theories for treatment of a patient with severe visual dysfunction complicated by ACM. CLINICAL FEATURES: A young woman had complex optic nerve neuritis exacerbated by an ACM type I of the brain. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: Applied kinesiology chiropractic treatment was used for treatment of loss of vision and nystagmus. After treatment, the patient's ability to see, read, and perform smooth eye tracking showed improvement. CONCLUSION: Further studies into applied kinesiology and cranial treatments for visual dysfunctions associated with ACM may be helpful to evaluate whether this single case study can be representative of a group of patients who might benefit from this care. Article Published Date : May 01, 2005

Conservative management of post-surgical urinary incontinence in an adolescent using applied kinesiology: a case report. 📎

Abstract Title: Conservative management of post-surgical urinary incontinence in an adolescent using applied kinesiology: a case report. Abstract Source: Altern Med Rev. 2011 Jun ;16(2):164-71. PMID: 21649458 Abstract Author(s): Scott C Cuthbert, Anthony L Rosner Article Affiliation: Chiropractic Health Center, Pueblo, CO 81004, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: INTRODUCTION: This case report describes the successful treatment of an adolescent female suffering daily stress and occasional total urinary incontinence with applied kinesiology methods and chiropractic manipulative therapy. PATIENT PRESENTATION: A 13-year-old female developed unpredictable urinary incontinence and right hip pain immediately following emergency open appendectomy surgery. The patient was forced to wear an incontinence pad throughout the day and night for 10 months because of unpredictable urinary incontinence. ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION: Chiropractic and applied kinesiology (AK) methods - a multi-modal diagnostic technique that utilizes manual muscle tests (MMT) for the detection of musculoskeletal impairments and specific AK techniques for correction of identified issues - were utilized to diagnose and treat this patient for muscle impairments in the lumbar spine and pelvis. RESULTS: Patient experienced a rapid resolution of her urinary incontinence and hip pain. A six-year follow-up confirmed complete resolution of symptoms. DISCUSSION: In this case, utilization of MMT allowed for the identification of several inhibited muscles. Utilizing the appropriate corrective techniques improved the strength of these muscles and resulted in their being graded as facilitated. Symptoms of urinary incontinence and hip pain resolved with this diagnostic and treatment approach. CONCLUSION: AK methods were useful for the discovery of a number of apparent causative factors underlying this patient's urinary incontinence and hip pain. Treatment for these pelvic-floor muscle and joint abnormalities resulted in rapid, long-lasting resolution of her urinary incontinence and hip pain. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2011
Therapeutic Actions Applied Kinesiology

NCBI pubmed

Vastus lateralis muscle tissue composition and motor unit properties in chronically endurance-trained vs. sedentary women.

Related Articles Vastus lateralis muscle tissue composition and motor unit properties in chronically endurance-trained vs. sedentary women. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2018 Sep;118(9):1789-1800 Authors: Dimmick HL, Miller JD, Sterczala AJ, Trevino MA, Herda TJ Abstract This study examined motor unit (MU) amplitudes (APAMPS) and firing rates during moderate-intensity contractions and muscle cross-sectional area (mCSA) and echo intensity (mEI) of the vastus lateralis (VL) in chronically endurance-trained and sedentary females. Eight endurance-trained (ET) and nine sedentary controls (SED) volunteered for this study. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals from a five-pin electrode array were recorded from the VL during isometric trapezoid muscle actions at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Decomposition methods were applied to the EMG signals to extract the firing events and amplitudes of single MUs. The mean firing rate (MFR) during steady force and MUAPAMP for each MU was regressed against recruitment threshold (RT, expressed as %MVC). The y-intercepts and slopes from the MFR and MUAPAMP vs. RT relationships were calculated. EMG amplitude during steady force was normalized (N-EMGRMS) to peak EMG amplitude recorded during the MVC. Ultrasonography was used to measure mCSA and mEI. Significant differences existed between the ET and SED for the slopes (P = 0.005, P = 0.001) from the MFR and MUAPAMP vs. RT relationships with no differences for the y-intercepts (P > 0.05). N-EMGRMS was significantly (P = 0.033) lower for the ET than SED. There were no differences between groups for mCSA; however, the SED possessed significantly (P = 0.001) greater mEI. Subsequently, the ET likely possessed hypertrophied and stronger MUs that allowed for lower necessary muscle activation to maintain the same relative task as the SED. The larger MUs for the ET is supported via the MFR vs. RT relationships and ultrasound data. PMID: 29948198 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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