CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Mud therapy

Effect of electro-acupuncture, massage, mud, and sauna therapies in patient with rheumatoid arthritis. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of electro-acupuncture, massage, mud, and sauna therapies in patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Abstract Source: J Ayurveda Integr Med. 2015 Oct-Dec;6(4):295-9. PMID: 26834431 Abstract Author(s): Geetha B Shetty, A Mooventhan, N Anagha Article Affiliation: Geetha B Shetty Abstract: A 48-year-old married woman diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 2007, came to our hospital in July 2014 with the complaint of severe pain and swelling over multiple joints, especially over small joints, which was associated with stiffness (more in morning), deformities of fingers and toes, with disturbed sleep and poor quality of life (QOL) for the past 7 years. She received a combination of electro acupuncture (14 sessions), massage (18 sessions), mud (18 sessions), and sauna (3 sessions) (EMMS) therapies for 30-min, 45-min, 30-min, and 15-min per session, respectively for 3 weeks. During and postintervention assessment showed reduction in visual analog scale score for pain, Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. It also showed an increase in the scores of 10-Meter Walk Test, isometric hand-grip test, and short form-36 version-2 health survey. This result suggest that, the EMMS therapy might be considered as an effective treatments in reducing pain, depression, anxiety, and stress with improvement in physical functions, quality of sleep and QOL in patient with RA. EMMS therapies were tolerated and no side effects were reported by the patient. Though the results are encouraging, further studies are required with larger sample size and advanced inflammatory markers. Article Published Date : Sep 30, 2015

Effect of mud compress therapy on cartilage destruction detected by CTX-II in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

Abstract Title: Effect of mud compress therapy on cartilage destruction detected by CTX-II in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Abstract Source: J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2015 Sep 6. Epub 2015 Sep 6. PMID: 26406208 Abstract Author(s): Gonca Odemis Gungen, Fusun Ardic, Gulin Findikoglu, Simin Rota Article Affiliation: Gonca Odemis Gungen Abstract: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of mud compress (MC) therapy compared to hot pack (HP) therapy on cartilage destruction and subchondral bone alterations detected by urine levels of C telopeptide fragment of collagen type-II (uCTX-II) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Fifty-nine patients between 49-74 years of age with bilateral knee OA divided into 2 groups. Twenty-five patients (16 females, 9 males) and 34 patients (22 females, 13 males) were given HP and local natural organic and mineral-rich MC therapy respectively for 2 weeks as a total of 12 sessions. uCTX-II, Visual Analog Scale (VAS), 15 m walking time, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities multifunctional (WOMAC) index were measured at baseline, after-treatment and 3 months after treatment. RESULTS: uCTX-II level did not show any difference between the two groups, however it decreased significantly in MC and HP groups 3 months after treatment (p<0.017). WOMAC stiffness sore was significantly lower in MC group 3 months after treatment (p<0.05). Both MC and HP therapies lowered VAS, WOMAC total and subscores significantly up to 3 months (p<0.017). CONCLUSIONS: HP and MC therapies for OA of knee are not superior to one another with respect to the level of uCTX-II. MC may probably decrease the ongoing cartilage destruction and related subchonral bone interactions earlier compared to HP treatment in patients with knee OA as evidenced by decreased uCTX-II levels after-treatment. Article Published Date : Sep 05, 2015

Short- and long-term effects of mud-bath treatment on hand osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial.

Abstract Title: Short- and long-term effects of mud-bath treatment on hand osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial. Abstract Source: Int J Biometeorol. 2014 Jan ;58(1):79-86. Epub 2013 Jan 14. PMID: 23314489 Abstract Author(s): Antonella Fioravanti, Sara Tenti, Chiara Giannitti, Nicola Angelo Fortunati, Mauro Galeazzi Article Affiliation: Antonella Fioravanti Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate both the short-term and the long-term effectiveness of spa therapy in patients with primary hand osteoarthritis (OA). This was a prospective randomized, single blind controlled trial. Sixty outpatients with primary bilateral hand OA were included in the study and randomized to one of two groups. One group (n = 30) was treated with 12 daily local mud packs and generalized thermal baths with a sulfate-calcium-magnesium-fluorides mineral water added to usual treatment. The control group (n = 30) continued regular outpatient care routine (exercise, NSAIDs and/or analgesics). Each patient was examined at baseline, after 2 weeks, and after 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Primary outcome measures were global spontaneous hand pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the functional index for hand osteoarthritis (FIHOA) score; secondary outcomes were health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), duration of morning stiffness, medical outcomes study 36-item short form (SF-36) and symptomatic drugs consumption. Our results demonstrated that the efficacy of spa therapy was significant in all the assessed parameters, both at the end of therapy and after 3 months; the values of FIHOA, HAQ and drugs consumption continued to be significantly better after 6 months in comparison with baseline. There were no significant modifications of the parameters throughout the follow-up in the control group. Differences between the two groups were significant for all parameters at the 15th day and at 3 months follow-up; regarding FIHOA, HAQ, and symptomatic drugs consumption, the difference between the two groups persisted and was significant at 6month follow-up. Tolerability of spa therapy seemed to be good. In conclusion, our results confirm that the beneficial effects of spa therapy in patients with hand OAlast over time. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2013

A multidisciplinary approach to study the effects of balneotherapy and mud-bath therapy treatments on fibromyalgia. 📎

Abstract Title: A multidisciplinary approach to study the effects of balneotherapy and mud-bath therapy treatments on fibromyalgia. Abstract Source: Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2013 Nov-Dec;31(6 Suppl 79):S111-20. Epub 2013 Dec 18. PMID: 24373369 Abstract Author(s): Laura Bazzichi, Ylenia Da Valle, Alessandra Rossi, Camillo Giacomelli, Francesca Sernissi, Gino Giannaccini, Laura Betti, Federica Ciregia, Laura Giusti, Pietro Scarpellini, Liliana Dell'Osso, Donatella Marazziti, Stefano Bombardieri, Antonio Lucacchini Article Affiliation: Laura Bazzichi Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To study the effects of both balneotherapy and mud-bath therapy treatments in patients affected by primary fibromyalgia (FM) using rheumatological, psychiatric, biochemical and proteomic approaches. METHODS: Forty-one FM patients (39 females, 2 males), who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria received a 2-week thermal therapy programme consisting of therapy once daily for 6 days/week. Twenty-one patients received mud-bath treatment, while the other twenty balneotherapy. Pain, symptoms, and quality of life were assessed. Oxytocin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ATP and serotonin transporter levels during therapy were assayed. Comparative whole saliva (WS) proteomic analysis was performed using a combination of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry techniques. RESULTS: We observed a reduction in pain, FIQ values and improvement of SF36 in both groups of patients treated with mud-bath or balneotherapy. The improvement of the outcome measures occurred with different timing and duration in the two spa treatments. A significant decrease in BDNF concentrations was observed either after balneotherapy or mud-bath therapy when assayed after twelve weeks, while no significant change in oxytocin levels, ATP levels and serotonin transporter were detected. Significant differences were observed for phosphoglycerate mutase1 (PGAM1) and zinc alpha-2-glycoprotein 1 (AZGP1) protein expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that the thermal treatment might have a beneficial effect on the specific symptoms of the disease. In particular, while balneotherapy gives results that in most patients occur after the end of the treatment but which are no longer noticeable after 3 months, the mud-bath treatment gives longer lasting results. Article Published Date : Oct 31, 2013

The effect of mud therapy on pain relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. 📎

Abstract Title: The effect of mud therapy on pain relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Abstract Source: J Int Med Res. 2013 Oct ;41(5):1418-25. Epub 2013 Sep 5. PMID: 24008567 Abstract Author(s): Hua Liu, Chao Zeng, Shu-guang Gao, Tuo Yang, Wei Luo, Yu-sheng Li, Yi-lin Xiong, Jin-peng Sun, Guang-hua Lei Article Affiliation: Hua Liu Abstract: OBJECTIVES: A meta-analysis was conducted to examine the effect of mud therapy on pain relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: A detailed search of PubMed®/MEDLINE® was undertaken to identify randomized controlled trials and prospective comparative studies published before 9 March 2013 that compared mud therapy with control group treatments in patients with knee OA. RESULTS: A quantitative meta-analysis of seven studies (410 patients) was performed. There was a significant difference between the groups in the visual analogue scale pain score (standardized mean difference [SMD] -0.73) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain score (SMD -0.30), with differences in favour of mud therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Mud therapy is a favourable option for pain relief in patients with knee OA. Additional high-quality randomized controlled trials need to be conducted to explore this issue further and to confirm this conclusion. Article Published Date : Sep 30, 2013

Oxidative stress, hemoglobin content, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity influenced by sulphur baths and mud packs in patients with osteoarthritis.

Abstract Title: Oxidative stress, hemoglobin content, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity influenced by sulphur baths and mud packs in patients with osteoarthritis. Abstract Source: Vojnosanit Pregl. 2010 Jul;67(7):573-8. PMID: 20707053 Abstract Author(s): Aleksandar Jokić, Nikola Sremcević, Zeki Karagülle, Tatjana Pekmezović, Vukosava Davidović Article Affiliation: Specialized Hospital for Rehabilitation, Banja Koviljaca Spa, Serbia. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND/AIM: It is weel-known that sulphur baths and mud paks demonstrate beneficial effects on patients suffering from degenerative knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) through the increased activity of protective antioxidant enzymes. The aim of this study was to assess lipid peroxidation level, i.e., malondialdehyde concetration, in individuals with knee and/or hip osteoarthritis (OA), as well as to determine the influence of sulphur baths and mud packs application on the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in order to minimize or eliminate excessive free radical species production (oxidative stress). METHODS: Thirty one patiens with knee and/or hip OA of both sexes were included in the study. All OA patients received mud pack and sulphur bath for 20 minutes a day, for 6 consecutive days a week, over 3 weeks. Blood lipid peroxidation, i.e., malondialdehyde concentration, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity were measured spectrophotometrically, before, on day 5 during the treatment and at the end of spa cure. Healthy volunteers (n=31) were the controls. RESULTS: The sulphur baths and mud packs treatment of OA patients caused a significant decrease in plasma malondialdehyde concentration compared to the controls (p<0.001). The mean SOD activity before the terapy was 1836.24 U/gHb, on day 5 it rose to 1942.15 U/gHb and after the spa cure dropped to 1745.98 U/gHb. Catalase activity before the therapy was 20.56 kU/gHb and at the end of the terapy decreased to 16.16 kU/gHb. The difference in catalase activity before and after the therapy was significant (p<0.001), and also significant as compared to control (p<0.001). At the end of the treatment significant increase of hemoglobin level and significant decrease of pain intensity were noticed. CONCLUSION: A combined 3-week treatment by sulphur bath and mud packs led to a significant decrease of lipid peroxidation in plasma, as well as pain intensity in the patients with OA. These changes were associated with changes in plasma activity of SOD and CAT and a significant increase of hemoglobin level suggesting their role in beneficial effect of spa therapy in the patients with OA. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2010

A study on the efficacy of treatment with mud packs and baths with Sillene mineral water (Chianciano Spa Italy) in patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis.

Abstract Title: A study on the efficacy of treatment with mud packs and baths with Sillene mineral water (Chianciano Spa Italy) in patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis. Abstract Source: Rheumatol Int. 2010 Apr 14. Epub 2010 Apr 14. PMID: 20390281 Abstract Author(s): Antonio Fraioli, Angelo Serio, Gioacchino Mennuni, Fulvia Ceccarelli, Luisa Petraccia, Mario Fontana, Marcello Grassi, Guido Valesini Article Affiliation: Dipartimento di Clinica e Terapia Medica, UOC Medicina Interna E, Terapia Medica e Medicina Termale, Scuola di Specializzazione in Idrologia Medica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, V.le del Policlinico 155, 00161, Rome, Italy, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Abstract: Mud-bath therapy plays a primary role in the treatment and prevention of osteoarthritis that has been recognised since antiquity. Numerous studies have demonstrated its clinical benefits and its effects on inflammatory mediators (interleukins), the immune system, cenesthesic factors (endorphins), and the diencephalic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy of mud-bath therapy with mineral water from the Sillene Spring at Italy's Chianciano Spa in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients (n = 61) were divided into two groups. Group A underwent three cycles of mud-based spa therapy over a year's time, whereas group B did not. Clinical conditions, visual analogue scale pain ratings, and Lequesne indexes of the two groups were compared. We also compared these same parameters in the patients of the two groups that were following the therapy with drugs and in the patients of the group A before and after spa treatment. The percentage of patients with no symptoms or mild symptoms was higher in group A than in group B. Within group A, this percentage was higher after treatment than before spa therapy. Even in the comparison between the patients of the two groups that were following the therapy with drug, the results was that in group A the percentage of patients with no symptoms or mild symptoms was higher than in group B. Statistical analyses based on various tests revealed that almost all these differences were highly significant. No adverse effects were observed in any of the patients in group A. In conclusion, the mud-bath therapy performed at Chianciano Spa with Sillene Spring water remarkably improved the clinical conditions of patients with knee arthritis and significantly reduces the frequency and severity of symptoms and the disability they cause. Article Published Date : Apr 14, 2010

Water-retentive and anti-inflammatory properties of organic and inorganic substances from Korean sea mud.

Abstract Title: Water-retentive and anti-inflammatory properties of organic and inorganic substances from Korean sea mud. Abstract Source: Nat Prod Commun. 2010 Mar;5(3):395-8. PMID: 20420315 Abstract Author(s): Jung-Hyun Kim, Jeongmi Lee, Hyang-Bok Lee, Jeong Hyun Shin, Eun-Ki Kim Article Affiliation: Department of Biological Engineering, Inha University, Incheon, Korea. Abstract: Sea mud has been popularly used as an effective base in cosmetic preparations although its biologically-active materials and mechanisms on skin have not yet been fully determined. We isolated humic substances as the major organic substance of the sea mud from a tidal flat in Korea, and investigated their water-retentive properties. Among the three isolated humic substances, humic acid (HA) showed the highest water retentive property (approximately 50 % mass increase from water uptake). Based on the observations that mud pack therapy has been traditionally used to soothe UV-irradiated skin, we examined the antiinflammatory property of the sea mud on UVB-irradiated human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) by measuring PGE2 levels produced by keratinocytes in the presence of either the total water or methanol extracts of the mud. The water extract showed higher inhibition of PGE2 production from HaCaT cells (30% inhibition) than the methanol extract at 200 ppm (microg/g). We further fractionated the water extract to determine the major components responsible for its anti-inflammatory effect. It was found that the minerals in the mud inhibited PGE2 production by 83 % at 200 ppm, which is comparable with the inhibitory effect of 1 microM indomethacin. No mud extract showed cytotoxicity at the tested concentrations. The mineral compositions of the mineral extract were determined by ICP-MS, revealing that the sea mud consisted of more than 19 different mineral components, rich in Na+, Mg2+, and Zn2+. These results imply that the anti-inflammatory effect of the sea mud is largely due to the minerals in the mud. Our research suggests the potential use of the organic and inorganic substances from the sea mud in various skin products as safe biological substances for skin protective purposes. Article Published Date : Mar 01, 2010

Comparison of intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections and mud-pack therapy in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

Abstract Title: Comparison of intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections and mud-pack therapy in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Abstract Source: Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc. 2010;44(1):42-7. PMID: 20513990 Abstract Author(s): Bora Bostan, Ufuk Sen, Taner Güneş, Seyyid Ahmet Sahin, Cengiz Sen, Mehmet Erdem, Unal Erkorkmaz Article Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Gaziosmanpaşa University, Tokat, Turkey. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVES: Conservative treatment should be tried prior to surgical treatment in knee osteoarthritis. This study was designed to evaluate the short-term effects of mud-pack therapy on pain relief and functional improvement in knee osteoarthritis in comparison with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections. METHODS: The study included 23 patients who were diagnosed as having knee osteoarthritis according to the ACR (American College of Rheumatology) criteria, and had complaints lasting for more than three months. All the patients had stage 2 or 3 osteoarthritis radiographically according to the Kellgren-Lawrence criteria. Twelve patients (3 males, 9 females; mean age 54+/-6 years; range 46 to 67 years) received mud therapy bilaterally. Mud packs were heated to 45 degrees C and applied on both knees for 30 minutes daily for a total of 12 weekdays. Eleven patients (2 males, 9 females; mean age 53+/-9 years; range 40 to 66 years) received a total of three bilateral intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections, each interspersed by weekly intervals. The patients were evaluated before and after treatment in terms of pain and functionality using the pain subscale of the WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities) osteoarthritis index, Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score, and Knee Society clinical rating system (knee and function scores). The patients were followed-up for a mean of 5.9+/-6.3 months (range 4 to 8 months) after mud-pack therapy, and 5.8+/-0.8 months (range 5 to 7 months) after intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections. RESULTS: No significant differences were found between the two groups with respect to pre-and posttreatment WOMAC, HSS, and knee and function scores (p>0.05). The scores of all instruments showed significant improvements following treatment in both groups (p<0.001). Posttreatment changes in relation to baseline scores did not differ significantly between the two groups (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Treatment of knee osteoarthritis with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections or mud-pack therapy yielded similar results in the short-term in terms of functional improvement and pain relief. Mud-pack therapy is a noninvasive, complication-free, and cost-effective alternative modality for the conservative treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2010

The efficacy of a topical gel prepared using Lake Urmia mud in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

Abstract Title: The efficacy of a topical gel prepared using Lake Urmia mud in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2009 Nov;15(11):1239-42. PMID: 19922256 Abstract Author(s): Nemati Mahboob, Kolahi Sousan, Azarmi Shirzad, Ghorbanihaghjo Amir, Varshoi Mohammad, Mokhtari Reza, Vatankhah Amir Mansour, Valizadeh Hadi Abstract: OBJECTIVES: Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by progressive cartilage degradation and secondary inflammation of the synovial membrane. Studies have shown that mud therapy may influence serum levels of several cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of OA and chondrocyte metabolism. The main targets of our research were to make use of Lake Urmia mud for topical gel formulation, evaluation of the possible therapeutic effects of this gel on symptoms of patients with knee OA and the evaluation of serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) level after mud therapy in comparison with the application of a placebo. METHODS: Fifty (50) patients suffering from knee OA participated in this study and randomized into two groups: case group and control group. Patients in the case group received mud therapy and the placebo was applied to patients in the control group. Three (3) parameters including pain, morning stiffness, and joint functionality were assessed in all patients. Visual analogue scale and Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) were the employed scales for pain assessment. Functional capacity was evaluated by using WOMAC functional capacity and WOMAC global index. All the mentioned steps were done before and after treatment. Blood samples, in both groups, were collected for measuring tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha serum level. RESULTS: All the differences (for three parameters), in the case group, were statistically significant. TNF-alpha serum level reduction in both groups were detected: 19.41% in the case group and 1.76% in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Mud therapy using formulated gel is an effective method in knee OA treatment and pain reduction. Further studies may be needed for the evaluation of possible synergism between pharmacological treatment and mud therapy. Article Published Date : Nov 01, 2009

The influence of peloids from volcanic deposits in Azerbaijan on the dynamics of sugar content in blood and urine and the wound healing in patients at the early stages of diabetic gangrene of the lower extremities

Abstract Title: [The influence of peloids from volcanic deposits in Azerbaijan on the dynamics of sugar content in blood and urine and the wound healing in patients at the early stages of diabetic gangrene of the lower extremities]. Abstract Source: Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2009 Nov-Dec(6):42-3. PMID: 20050166 Abstract Author(s): M Ia Nasirov, F M Efendieva, D A Ismaĭlova Abstract: The treatment of diabetic patients with pyonecrotic lesions in the lower extremities requires prolonged reflexo-segmental balneophysiotherapy to normalize functions of the nerve centres. Curative volcanic mud solutions (15-24 g/l) enriched with organic and nonorganic biologically active compounds from volcanic deposits in Azerbaijan were used for the first time to treat such patients. Peloids were applied to the lumbar region (location of sympathetic nerve nodes) and the lower legs above and beneath the affected sites. The patients were subjected to 12-15 seances of peloidotherapy (at 40-41 degrees Celsius) each lasting 20-30 minutes. The treatment was preceded by wound sanation using the standard procedure and a course of antibiotic therapy based on individual antibiotocograms. A total of 86 daibetic patients with leg gangrene underwent rheovasographic thermovision examination that revealed enhanced blood supply to the affected extremities under the action of the applied peloids. Peloidotherapy resulted in the normalization of blood and urine glucose levels in 53 (63%) of the patients. Simultaneously, the doses of medicamentous therapy could be lowered. Wound and ulcer healing was completed in the majority of the patients (86%) by the end of balneophysiotherapy when fresh granulation tissue began to develop and signs of oedema to disappear. These patients no longer needed amputation. Article Published Date : Nov 01, 2009

Effect of peloid applications of different temperatures on the function of the cardiovascular system in patients with osteoarthrosis and concomitant hypertensive disease and ischemic heart disease

Abstract Title: [Effect of peloid applications of different temperatures on the function of the cardiovascular system in patients with osteoarthrosis and concomitant hypertensive disease and ischemic heart disease]. Abstract Source: Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2009 Sep-Oct(5):11-3. PMID: 19882889 Abstract Author(s): N V L'vova, Iu Iu Tupitsyna, V K Orus-Ool, O D Lebedeva Abstract: This study investigated changes of systemic and intracardiac hemodynamics under effect of mud application at different temparatures (10, 20-24, and 36 degrees C) in patients with osteoarthrosis and concomitant hypertensive disease and coronary heart disease. It is concluded that combined treatment of this condition should include low-temperature peloidotherapy as a major component since it has the most beneficial effect on general and intracardiac hemodynamics. Article Published Date : Sep 01, 2009

Spa therapy in rheumatology. Indications based on the clinical guidelines of the French National Authority for health and the European League Against Rheumatism, and the results of 19 randomized clinical trials

Abstract Title: [Spa therapy in rheumatology. Indications based on the clinical guidelines of the French National Authority for health and the European League Against Rheumatism, and the results of 19 randomized clinical trials]. Abstract Source: Bull Acad Natl Med. 2009 Jun;193(6):1345-56; discussion 1356-8. PMID: 20120164 Abstract Author(s): Alain Françon, Romain Forestier Article Affiliation: Centre de recherches rhumatologiques et thermales, 73100 Aix les Bains. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: The objective of this work was to update the rheumatologic indications of spa therapy, based on clinical practice guidelines published by the French National Authority for Health (HAS) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), and on the results of randomized clinical trials (RCT) METHODOLOGY: We first examined the indications for which spa therapy is mentioned and/or recommended in HAS and EULAR guidelines. We then identified RCTs in spa therapy and rheumatology by using the key words spa therapy, balneology, balneotherapy, hydrotherapy, mud therapy and mineral water in the Pubmed, Pascal and Embase databases. Only RCTs including a statistical analysis of between-group outcomes were retained We also examined the possible contribution of RCTs not listed in the bibliography of the guidelines. RESULTS: RECOMMENDATIONS: spa therapy is recommended by HAS for chronic lower back pain, rank B and for stabilized rheumatoid arthritis, rank C. In ankylosing spondylitis, EULAR classifies spa therapy along with physiotherapy, rank A. In fibromyalgia, EULAR recommends hot-water balneology, an important component of spa therapy, rank B, based on five RCTs, of which three were carried out in thermal springs. Nineteen RCTs that comprised a statistical comparison of between-group outcomes were identified Sixteen studies indicated a persistent improvement (at least twelve weeks) in pain, analgesic and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug consumption, functional capacity and/or quality of life, in the following indications: chronic lower back pain, knee osteoarthritis, hand osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, ankylosing spondylitis andrheumatoidarthritis (PR). CONCLUSION: Spa therapy, or hot-water balneology, appears to be indicated for chronic low back pain, stabilized rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and fibromyalgia. RCT findings suggest that patients with knee and hand osteoarthritis might also benefit. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2009

Effect of naphthalan and therapeutic mud applications on clinical and roentgenological characteristics in patients with protracted pneumonia

Abstract Title: [Effect of naphthalan and therapeutic mud applications on clinical and roentgenological characteristics in patients with protracted pneumonia]. Abstract Source: Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2009 May-Jun(3):16-9. PMID: 19637834 Abstract Author(s): M A Rassulova, L A Siziakova, N S Aĭrapetova Abstract: The influence of application of naftalan and therapeutic muds on clinical and roentgenological parameters, external respiration function, biochemical and immunological characteristics of the inflammatory process was studied in 82 patients presenting with protracted pneumonia and compared with the outcome of therapy using no physical factors. The application of naftalan and therapeutic muds was shown to reduce activity of inflammatory processes, improve airway patency and the state ofbronchial mucosa. Naftalan produced better therapeutic effect than muds. Article Published Date : May 01, 2009

Does mud pack treatment have any chemical effect? A randomized controlled clinical study.

Abstract Title: Does mud pack treatment have any chemical effect? A randomized controlled clinical study. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Jun;14(5):559-65. PMID: 18564957 Abstract Author(s): Ersin Odabasi, Mustafa Turan, Hakan Erdem, Faruk Tekbas Article Affiliation: Department of Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology, Gulhane School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to reveal the efficacy of mud pack treatment in patients with knee osteoarthritis and to find the contribution of chemical factors to the build up of these effects. METHODS: Sixty patients were randomly assigned to directly applied mud pack (study) group or to nylon-covered mud pack (control) group. Thirty patients in the study group had mud application 15 times to both knees: heated mud, up to 43 degrees C, was applied to skin directly for 30 minutes. Thirty patients in the control group had the same treatment as the study group except heated mud was applied over an impermeable nylon pack. Primary outcome measures of the study were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) index, pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS), patient's assessment of disease severity index, physician's assessment of disease severity index, and analgesic consumption. The patients were evaluated before and after (end of 15th application) the intervention and followed up for 24 weeks at 4-week intervals. The results were assessed on an intent-to-treat basis. RESULTS: As compared to the baseline, significant decreases were observed in WOMAC, pain intensity, disease severity index scores, and analgesic consumption in both groups after the intervention. Observed improvements in the study group were found to be superior to the control during the whole postintervention follow-up, except for analgesic consumption in the third week. A significant number of patients in the study group showed minimal clinically important improvement as compared to the control group. CONCLUSION: Mud pack treatment significantly improved the pain and functional status of patients with knee osteoarthritis, whether applied directly or coated with nylon. Direct application was found to be superior, which implies chemical properties of the mud contribute to the build up of therapeutic effect. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2008
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Skin Tolerance of Three Types of Dead Sea Mud on Healthy Skin: A Short-Term Study.

Related Articles Skin Tolerance of Three Types of Dead Sea Mud on Healthy Skin: A Short-Term Study. J Cosmet Sci. 2018 Jul/Aug;69(4):269-278 Authors: Hamed S, Almalty AM Abstract Dead Sea mud (DSM) is commonly used by patients with various skin conditions because of its contents of healing elements. No study was published to show whether DSM application weakens or strengthens skin barrier function. In this study, we investigated the impact of 30-minute single application of various types of DSM ("As Is" mud, mud with extra Dead Sea salt, and over-the-shelf mud) on the barrier function of normal skin. The influence of 30-minute application of various types of DSM was investigated noninvasively on skin barrier properties of healthy female adult volunteers (n = 75) on predetermined circular areas. Skin hydration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema and melanin levels, and skin pH were measured directly, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes after mud removal. Thirty-minute single application of DSM was well tolerated with short-lived moisturizing effects, which was enhanced by the presence of humectant ingredients, and with no negative impact on barrier integrity, pH, and erythema and melanin levels. PMID: 30311902 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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