Therapeutic Actions Spiritual Beliefs

NCBI pubmed

Spirituality Experiences in Hemophilia Patients: A Phenomenological Study.

Related Articles Spirituality Experiences in Hemophilia Patients: A Phenomenological Study. J Relig Health. 2018 Apr 17;: Authors: Rambod M, Sharif F, Molazem Z, Khair K Abstract Spirituality plays an important role in coping with chronic diseases. However, the meaning of spirituality is not known in hemophilia, as a chronic disease. This study aimed to explore the essence of spirituality in hemophilia patients. This qualitative study with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach was conducted on twelve Muslim adult hemophilia patients. The participants were selected using purposeful sampling. The data were gathered through interview. Then, the data were analyzed using thematic analysis and van Manen's methodological framework. MAX.QDA qualitative software package 2010 was used to import the transcripts and analyze the data. Four themes were identified: "relationship with God," "God as the fulcrum," "strong religious beliefs," and "spiritual satisfaction." "Relationship with God" meant "to ask God for help" and "praying for oneself and others." "God as the fulcrum" consisted of two subthemes, i.e., "hope in God" and "Trust in God." "Strong religious beliefs" also included "belief in openness of God's mercy," "belief in God and the omnipotence of God," and "belief in creation by God." Finally, "spiritual satisfaction" consisted of two subthemes, namely "accepting the providence" and "thanking the divine blessings." Spirituality in hemophilia patients meant having relationship with God who was considered as the fulcrum, strong religious beliefs, and spiritual satisfaction. By understanding the hemophilia patients' spirituality experiences, the nurses and healthcare workers could provide holistic care focused on spirituality. Yet, more studies are recommended to be conducted on hemophilia patients to explore spirituality in other religions. PMID: 29667073 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Spiritual and Religious coping and depression among family caregivers of pediatric cancer patients in Latin America.

Related Articles Spiritual and Religious coping and depression among family caregivers of pediatric cancer patients in Latin America. Psychooncology. 2018 Apr 16;: Authors: Vitorino LM, Lopes-Júnior LC, de Oliveira GH, Tenaglia M, Brunheroto A, Cortez PJO, Lucchetti G Abstract OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown that spiritual/religious beliefs are associated with mental health and quality of life. However, so far, no study assessed the relationship between spiritual/religious coping (SRC) and depressive symptoms in family caregivers (FCs) of pediatric cancer patients, particularly in Latin America. This study aimed to investigate whether Positive and Negative SRC strategies are associated with depressive symptoms in FCs of pediatric cancer patients in Brazil. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study comprising 77 FCs of pediatric cancer patients from one Brazilian Pediatric Oncology Institute. SRC was assessed using the Brief SRC scale and depressive symptoms were evaluated by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Multiple regression models were performed to identify factors associated with SRC of FCs and their depressive symptoms. RESULTS: In the unadjusted linear regression models, depressive symptoms were positively associated with Negative SRC (B = 0.401; P < .001; Adjusted R2 = 16.1%) but not with Positive SRC (B = 0.111; P = .334). After adjusting for socio-demographics, religious practice/faith and health, Negative SRC remained associated with depressive symptoms (B = 3.56, P = .01, Adjusted R2 = 37.8%). In the logistic regression models, depressive symptoms were positively associated with Negative SRC (OR=3.68, CI95%: 1.46-9.25; P = .006), but not with Positive SRC (OR=1.49, CI95% : .69-3.22; P = .309). After adjustements, Negative SRC remained significant (OR=4.01, CI95% : 1.21-13.33; P =.023). CONCLUSIONS: Negative SRC was associated with depressive symptoms in family caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. Health professionals must be aware of the use of Negative SRC strategies in oncology care. PMID: 29663569 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Nurses' Perceptions of Competence in Providing Spiritual Care.

Related Articles Nurses' Perceptions of Competence in Providing Spiritual Care. J Holist Nurs. 2018 Mar;36(1):33-37 Authors: Abell CH, Garrett-Wright D, Abell CE Abstract PURPOSE: The study examined nurses' perception of competence in providing spiritual care. DESIGN OF STUDY: A descriptive correlational research design with a convenience sample was used. METHOD: Participates completed a demographic questionnaire and the Spiritual Care Competence Scale, which has six domains: assessment and implementation of spiritual care, professionalization and improving the quality of spiritual care, personal support and patient counseling, referral to professionals, attitude toward the patient's spirituality, and communication. FINDINGS: The domain of communication had the most favorable perception among participants and the domain of professionalization and improving the quality of spiritual care had the least favorable perception. CONCLUSIONS: It is important for nurses to have the opportunity to gain knowledge regarding this significant component of holistic care. PMID: 29436973 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Another Chance at Life: Jordanian Patients' Experience of Going Through a Myocardial Infarction.

Related Articles Another Chance at Life: Jordanian Patients' Experience of Going Through a Myocardial Infarction. Res Theory Nurs Pract. 2017 Nov 01;31(4):334-348 Authors: Ammouri AA, Kamanyire JK, Abu Raddaha AH, Achora S, Obeidat AA Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Myocardial infarction (MI) is a life-threatening health condition that has physical, spiritual, emotional, and social changes. Understanding feelings and thoughts of patients who suffered MI attacks is essential to recovery. Among Jordanian patients who suffered an acute attack of MI, the aim of the study was to describe the experiences and the varied meanings that they assign to their experiences. METHODS: A qualitative hermeneutic phenomenological research design was used. Five participants were engaged in in-depth semistructured interviews. The participants were identified using a purposeful sampling technique, after being admitted at a coronary care unit in a university hospital located in Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The hospital provides a full range of cardiovascular medical and surgical care for patients admitted from different socioeconomic levels. Transcribed data were analyzed following inductive qualitative content analysis method. RESULTS: The experience of MI was a traumatizing event characterized by life-threatening symptoms, and participants feared they would not come back home. However, cultural values and religiosity among the Jordanian patients played a major role in facilitating their positive coping during and after the MI attack. The participants' recount of their experience was summed-up into 5 major themes: frightening experience, needed support, religiosity, experiencing changes, and lifestyle modifications. After the MI attack, most of the participants felt that they had given another chance to live, showing a pressing need to make healthier lifestyle modifications to avoid another MI attack. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Health care workers should need not only pay attention on physical and physiological caring aspects but should also consider other patients' needs, while supporting the patients and their family members. PMID: 29137693 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Embracing Ritual Healing: The Case of Sazuke in Tenrikyo in Contemporary Taiwan.

Related Articles Embracing Ritual Healing: The Case of Sazuke in Tenrikyo in Contemporary Taiwan. J Relig Health. 2017 Aug;56(4):1317-1334 Authors: Huang YP Abstract This paper will explore how the practice of ritual healing (sazuke) has played a prominent part in the propagation of a Japanese new religious movement (Tenrikyo) in Taiwan. The author firstly unravels the mystery of Tenrikyo's healing ritual (sazuke) and its role in enabling Taiwanese followers' potential to re-establish their relationship with the world. The author points out that sazuke is similar to Taiwanese folk therapy and fits into Taiwan's multi-medical systems. The author also examines the features of Tenrikyo's healing practice in Taiwan and discusses the evolution of sazuke from a non-institutionalised practice to a bureaucratised one. The author then advances to a more widely theoretical consideration by discussing how sazuke became a force that enabled Taiwanese people to respond to the changing world and how it facilitated peoples' transformation when they were confronted by daily troubles and difficulties. PMID: 26892687 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]