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Myofascial trigger points in children with tension-type headache: a new diagnostic and therapeutic option.

Abstract Title: Myofascial trigger points in children with tension-type headache: a new diagnostic and therapeutic option. Abstract Source: J Enzyme Inhib. 1992;5(4):293-8. PMID: 19339283 Abstract Author(s): Celina von Stülpnagel, Peter Reilich, Andreas Straube, Jan Schäfer, Astrid Blaschek, Seung-Hee Lee, Wolfgang Müller-Felber, Volkmar Henschel, Ulrich Mansmann, Florian Heinen Abstract: The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate the effect of a trigger point-specific physiotherapy on headache frequency, intensity, and duration in children with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Patients were recruited from the special headache outpatient clinic. A total of 9 girls (mean age 13.1 years; range, 5-15 years) with the diagnosis of tension-type headache participated in the pilot study from May to September 2006 and received trigger point-specific physiotherapy twice a week by a trained physiotherapist. After an average number of 6.5 therapeutic sessions, the headache frequency had been reduced by 67.7%, intensity by 74.3%, and duration by 77.3%. No side effects were noted during the treatment. These preliminary findings suggest a role for active trigger points in children with tension-type headache. Trigger point-specific physiotherapy seems to be an effective therapy in these children. Further prospective and controlled studies in a larger cohort are warranted. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 1992
Therapeutic Actions Trigger Point Physiotherapy

NCBI pubmed

The effect of dry needling on the active trigger point of upper trapezius muscle: Eliciting local twitch response on long-term clinical outcomes.

Related Articles The effect of dry needling on the active trigger point of upper trapezius muscle: Eliciting local twitch response on long-term clinical outcomes. J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2019 Jan 03;: Authors: Hakim IK, Takamjani IE, Sarrafzadeh J, Ezzati K, Bagheri R Abstract BACKGROUND: Pain from myofascial trigger points is often treated by dry needling (DN). Empirical evidence suggests eliciting a local twitch response (LTR) during needling is essential. Muscle damage after eliciting LTR can increase the risk of tissue fibrosis in some cases. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare two methods of DN including with and without LTR on clinical parameters. METHODS: Twenty-six participants suffering from chronic non-specific neck pain with an active trigger point (TrP) in their upper trapezius muscles were recruited via the convenience sampling method. Participants were randomly assigned in DN with LTR (control group) and without eliciting LTR or "de qi" (experimental group). Then, they received 3 sessions of dry needling, 3 days apart. We evaluated pain, pain pressure threshold, active cervical lateral flexion range of motion, and Neck Disability Index before the intervention and 4 weeks after the treatment. RESULTS: After the treatment, significant higher changes were seen in the experimental group compared to the control group (p< 0.05) regarding pain, pain pressure threshold, and active cervical lateral flexion. However, there was no significant difference between groups according to the disability (p> 0.05). CONCLUSION: DN without eliciting LTR has superiority over the DN along with eliciting LTR while the treatment aimed to receive long-term effects. PMID: 30636729 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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