Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Trigger Point Physiotherapy

Myofascial trigger points in children with tension-type headache: a new diagnostic and therapeutic option.

Abstract Title: Myofascial trigger points in children with tension-type headache: a new diagnostic and therapeutic option. Abstract Source: J Enzyme Inhib. 1992;5(4):293-8. PMID: 19339283 Abstract Author(s): Celina von Stülpnagel, Peter Reilich, Andreas Straube, Jan Schäfer, Astrid Blaschek, Seung-Hee Lee, Wolfgang Müller-Felber, Volkmar Henschel, Ulrich Mansmann, Florian Heinen Abstract: The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate the effect of a trigger point-specific physiotherapy on headache frequency, intensity, and duration in children with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Patients were recruited from the special headache outpatient clinic. A total of 9 girls (mean age 13.1 years; range, 5-15 years) with the diagnosis of tension-type headache participated in the pilot study from May to September 2006 and received trigger point-specific physiotherapy twice a week by a trained physiotherapist. After an average number of 6.5 therapeutic sessions, the headache frequency had been reduced by 67.7%, intensity by 74.3%, and duration by 77.3%. No side effects were noted during the treatment. These preliminary findings suggest a role for active trigger points in children with tension-type headache. Trigger point-specific physiotherapy seems to be an effective therapy in these children. Further prospective and controlled studies in a larger cohort are warranted. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 1992
Therapeutic Actions Trigger Point Physiotherapy

NCBI pubmed

Effects of sternocleidomastoid muscle and suboccipital muscle soft tissue release on muscle hardness and pressure pain of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and upper trapezius muscle in smartphone users with latent trigger points.

Related Articles Effects of sternocleidomastoid muscle and suboccipital muscle soft tissue release on muscle hardness and pressure pain of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and upper trapezius muscle in smartphone users with latent trigger points. Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Sep;97(36):e12133 Authors: Kim SJ, Lee JH Abstract Few studies have been performed regarding the reduction of pain in the upper trapezius (UT) muscle by applying interventions to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle, which is innervated by the same nerves.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of soft tissue release intervention on the SCM and suboccipital muscles with regard to muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the SCM and UT muscles in smartphone users with latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the UT muscle.Seventeen smartphone users (5 men and 12 women) with latent MTrPs in the UT muscle participated in the study. This study used a single blinding, cross-over design, wherein sternocleidomastoid soft tissue release (SSTR) and suboccipital release (SR) were applied on the subjects in random order one week apart. Muscle hardness and the PPT of the SCM and UT muscles were assessed before and after the intervention.After SSTR was applied, the SCM and UT muscles showed a significant decrease in muscle hardness and a significant increase in PPT. After SR was applied, the UT muscle showed a significant decrease in muscle hardness and a significant increase in PPT. When comparing the amount of change between the SSTR and SR interventions, significant differences were found for SCM muscle hardness and PPT of the UT muscle in the SSTR intervention, compared with the SR intervention.Therefore, we suggest that, to reduce pain in the UT muscle, it may be useful to apply intervention directly to the UT muscle, as well as to the SCM muscle, which is innervated by the same nerve. PMID: 30200103 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]