Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Non-Western Diet

Postmenopausal breast cancer risk and dietary patterns in the E3N-EPIC prospective cohort study. 📎

Abstract Title: Postmenopausal breast cancer risk and dietary patterns in the E3N-EPIC prospective cohort study. Abstract Source: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Nov 15;170(10):1257-67. Epub 2009 Oct 14. PMID: 19828509 Abstract Author(s): Vanessa Cottet, Mathilde Touvier, Agnès Fournier, Marina S Touillaud, Lionel Lafay, Françoise Clavel-Chapelon, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault Abstract: Since evidence relating diet to breast cancer risk is not sufficiently consistent to elaborate preventive proposals, the authors examined the association between dietary patterns and breast cancer risk in a large French cohort study. The analyses included 2,381 postmenopausal invasive breast cancer cases diagnosed during a median 9.7-year follow-up period (1993-2005) among 65,374 women from the E3N-EPIC cohort. Scores for dietary patterns were obtained by factor analysis, and breast cancer hazard ratios were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression for the highest quartile of dietary pattern score versus the lowest. Two dietary patterns were identified: "alcohol/Western" (essentially meat products, French fries, appetizers, rice/pasta, potatoes, pulses, pizza/pies, canned fish, eggs, alcoholic beverages, cakes, mayonnaise, and butter/cream) and "healthy/Mediterranean" (essentially vegetables, fruits, seafood, olive oil, and sunflower oil). The first pattern was positively associated with breast cancer risk (hazard ratio = 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.38; P = 0.007 for linear trend), especially when tumors were estrogen receptor-positive/progesterone receptor-positive. The "healthy/Mediterranean" pattern was negatively associated with breast cancer risk (hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.75, 0.95; P = 0.003 for linear trend), especially when tumors were estrogen receptor-positive/progesterone receptor-negative. Adherence to a diet comprising mostly fruits, vegetables, fish, and olive/sunflower oil, along with avoidance of Western-type foods, may contribute to a substantial reduction in postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Article Published Date : Nov 15, 2009

Dietary patterns and breast cancer risk in the shanghai breast cancer study. 📎

Abstract Title: Dietary patterns and breast cancer risk in the shanghai breast cancer study. Abstract Source: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Jul;16(7):1443-8. Epub 2007 Jul 10. PMID: 17623805 Abstract Author(s): Xiaohui Cui, Qi Dai, Marilyn Tseng, Xiao-Ou Shu, Yu-Tang Gao, Wei Zheng Abstract: The association of breast cancer with dietary patterns such as a western diet has not been studied in Asian women. We examined this among Shanghai Breast Cancer Study participants. Cases were of ages 25 to 64 years, diagnosed 08/1996-03/1998, and identified through a rapid case ascertainment system supplemented by the Shanghai Cancer Registry. Controls, selected from the general population of urban Shanghai, were frequency matched to cases by 5-year age group. Participants provided information on diet, lifestyle, and reproductive factors. In principal component analysis among 1,556 controls, two patterns emerged: a "vegetable-soy" pattern (tofu, cauliflower, beans, bean sprouts, green leafy vegetables) and a "meat-sweet" pattern (shrimp, chicken, beef, pork, candy, desserts). In adjusted unconditional logistic regression analyses including 1,446 cases and 1,549 controls with complete covariate data, risk was not associated with the vegetable-soy pattern. It was associated with the meat-sweet pattern (4th versus 1st quartile: odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.7; P(trend) = 0.03), but only in postmenopausal women, specifically among those with estrogen receptor-positive tumors (4th versus 1st quartile: odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.3; P(trend) = 0.03). Our findings indicate that a western diet increases breast cancer risk in postmenopausal Chinese women. They also suggest the value of quantifying aggregate risk for common combinations of foods. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2007

Dietary patterns associated with functional constipation among Japanese women aged 18 to 20 years: a cross-sectional study. 📎

Abstract Title: Dietary patterns associated with functional constipation among Japanese women aged 18 to 20 years: a cross-sectional study. Abstract Source: J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). 2007 Jun;53(3):232-8. PMID: 17874828 Abstract Author(s): Hitomi Okubo, Satoshi Sasaki, Kentaro Murakami, Mi Kyung Kim, Yoshiko Takahashi, Yoko Hosoi, Mami Itabashi, Abstract: Although several nutrients and foods have been suggested to be preventive for constipation, all previous studies have examined a single nutrient or food in each analysis. In contrast, analysis of dietary patterns may provide new insights into the influence of diet on functional constipation. We conducted a cross-sectional examination of the association between dietary pattern and functional constipation in 3,770 Japanese female dietetic course students aged 18-20 y from 53 institutions in Japan. Diet was assessed with a validated self-administered diet history questionnaire with 148 food items, from which 30 food groups were created and entered into a factor analysis. Functional constipation was defined using the Rome I criteria, which has previously been used in several epidemiologic studies on constipation. The prevalence of functional constipation was 26.0% (n=979). Four dietary patterns were identified: (1) "Healthy", (2) "Japanese traditional", (3) "Western," and 4) "Coffee and dairy products." After adjustment for several confounding factors, the "Japanese traditional" pattern, characterized by a high intake of rice, miso soup, and soy products and a low intake of bread and confectionaries, was associated with a significantly lower prevalence of functional constipation. In comparison with the lowest quintile, the multivariate adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.41-0.66) in the highest quintile (p for trend<0.0001). Other dietary patterns were not associated with functional constipation. The Japanese traditional dietary pattern, characterized by a high intake of rice and a low intake of bread and confectionaries, may be beneficial in preventing functional constipation in young Japanese women. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2007

Diet and asthma: has the role of dietary lipids been overlooked in the management of asthma?

Abstract Title: Diet and asthma: has the role of dietary lipids been overlooked in the management of asthma? Abstract Source: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2003 Apr;90(4):371-7; quiz 377-8, 421. PMID: 12722956 Abstract Author(s): Sheldon L Spector, Marc E Surette Article Affiliation: University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: This article discusses the role of diet in the management of asthma. Readers will gain an understanding of how evolution of the western diet has contributed to increased asthma prevalence and how dietary modification that includes management of dietary lipids may reduce symptoms of asthma. DATA SOURCES: Relevant studies published in English were reviewed. STUDY SELECTION: Medline search to identify peer-reviewed abstracts and journal articles. RESULTS: Asthma and obesity, which often occur together, have increased in prevalence in recent years. Studies suggest adaption of a western diet has not only contributed to obesity, but that increased intake of specific nutrients can cause changes in the frequency and severity of asthma. Increased asthma prevalence has also been proposed to arise from increased exposure to diesel particles or lack of exposure to infectious agents or endotoxins during childhood, generating a biased Th2 immune response, and increased cytokine and leukotriene production. Antagonists directed against these pro-inflammatory mediators include anticytokines and antileukotrienes. A reduction in the levels of inflammatory mediators associated with asthma has also been seen with dietary interventions, such as the administration of oils containing gamma-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence suggests elevated body mass index and dietary patterns, especially intake of dietary lipids, contribute to symptoms of asthma. Dietary modification may help patients manage their asthma as well as contribute to their overall health. Article Published Date : Apr 01, 2003
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Non-Western Diet

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Epidemiology and economics of nephrolithiasis.

Related Articles Epidemiology and economics of nephrolithiasis. Investig Clin Urol. 2017 Sep;58(5):299-306 Authors: Ziemba JB, Matlaga BR Abstract Nephrolithiasis is a disease common in both the Western and non-Western world. Several population based studies have demonstrated a rising prevalence and incidence of the disease over the last several decades. Recurrence occurs frequently after an initial stone event. The influence of diet on the risk of nephrolithiasis is important, particularly dietary calcium and fluid intake. An increasing intake of dietary calcium and fluid are consistently associated with a reduced risk of incident nephrolithiasis in both men and women. Increasing evidence suggests that nephrolithiasis is associated with systemic diseases like obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Nephrolithiasis places a significant burden on the health care system, which is likely to increase with time. PMID: 28868500 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]