Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Physical Therapy

The use of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), gamma linolenic acid (GLA) and rehabilitation in the treatment of back pain: effect on health-related quality of life. 📎

Abstract Title: The use of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), gamma linolenic acid (GLA) and rehabilitation in the treatment of back pain: effect on health-related quality of life. Abstract Source: Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol. 2009 Jul-Sep;22(3 Suppl):45-50. PMID: 19887043 Abstract Author(s): M Ranieri, M Sciuscio, A M Cortese, A Santamato, L Di Teo, G Ianieri, R G Bellomo, M Stasi, M Megna Article Affiliation: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Unit, Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences Department, Aldo Moro University, Bari 70124, Italy. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and the beneficial effect of physical exercise on positive sensory symptoms and neuropathic pain in patients with compressive radiculopathy syndrome from disc-nerve root conflict. Often these painful syndromes after the acute event, tend to recurr becoming subacute or chronic syndromes that become for the period of interest disabiling is an event very important in these cases proper prevention, based on a maintenance drug therapy and the strengthening exercises of paravertebral muscles, flexibility exercises on the spine and when needed on the reduction of body weight. In this Observational Cohort, two-arm trial, 203 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups, the first, ALA and GLA group, (n = 101) received oral dose of 600 mg of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) and 360 mg of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and a rehabilitation program for six weeks, the second (n = 102) treated with only rehabilitation program. Patients were recruited at the centre of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, they underwent a physiatric examination at the primary outcome (t0) and secondary outcomes were recorded at monitoring visits scheduled at two weeks = t1, four weeks = t2, six weeks = t3, and at the same has been administered the following scale: VAS scale, SF-36, Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire, Aberdeen Back Pain Scale (ABPS), Revised Leeds Disability Questionnaire (LDQ), Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire. Significant improvements was noted in the ALA and GLA group for paresthesia, stabbing and burning pain, as showed by VAS (Visual Analogue Scale), Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale; also, improvements of quality of life has been noted, in the same group, as showed by SF-36, LDQ (Revised Leeds Disability Questionnaire), Roland and Morris disability questionnaire. All these outcome measure showed statistically significant decreases. Oral treatment with alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) for six weeks in synergy with rehabilitation therapy improved neuropathic symptoms and deficits in patients with radicular neuropathy. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2009

The immediate effect of musculoskeletal physiotherapy techniques and massage on pain and ease of breathing in adults with cystic fibrosis. 📎

Abstract Title: The immediate effect of musculoskeletal physiotherapy techniques and massage on pain and ease of breathing in adults with cystic fibrosis. Abstract Source: J Cyst Fibros. 2009 Jan;8(1):79-81. Epub 2008 Aug 20. PMID: 18718820 Abstract Author(s): Annemarie Lee, Melissa Holdsworth, Anne Holland, Brenda Button Abstract: The optimal treatment approach to musculoskeletal pain in cystic fibrosis remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the effect of a combination of musculoskeletal physiotherapy techniques and massage therapy on musculoskeletal pain and ease of breathing. A single treatment session was associated with reduction in pain and improvement in ease of breathing in adults with cystic fibrosis. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2009

Comparative analysis of biofeedback and physical therapy for treatment of urinary stress incontinence in women.

Abstract Title: Comparative analysis of biofeedback and physical therapy for treatment of urinary stress incontinence in women. Abstract Source: Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2001 Jul;80(7):494-502. PMID: 11421517 Abstract Author(s): I H Pages, S Jahr, M K Schaufele, E Conradi Article Affiliation: Outpatient Clinic, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University Hospital Charité, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of an intensive group physical therapy program with individual biofeedback training for female patients with urinary stress incontinence. DESIGN: Randomized study of two therapeutic interventions consisting of a specific physical therapy program (PT) or biofeedback training (BF) daily for 4 wk, followed by a 2-mo, unsupervised home exercise program in both groups in an outpatient clinic of a large university hospital. Forty women, referred by gynecologists for nonoperative treatment of genuine stress incontinence of mild-to-moderate severity, were included. Measurements of daytime/nocturnal urinary frequency and subjective improvement of incontinence were the main outcome measures at initial presentation, after completion of the therapy program, and at follow-up after 3 mo. Standardized examinations of digital contraction strength, speculum tests, and manometric measurements were documented as secondary outcome measures. RESULTS: In the PT group, the daytime urination frequency decreased 22% after 4 wk of therapy and 19% after 3 mo (P<0.05) from baseline. The nocturnal urination frequency was reduced by 66% after 4 wk of therapy and 62% after 3 mo (P<0.001). In the BF group, the daily urination frequency decreased 10% after 4 wk of therapy and 5% after 3 mo (P>0.05). The nocturnal urination frequency declined 36% after 4 wk of therapy and 66% after 3 months (P<0.05). Subjective assessment after 3 mo showed that in the PT group, 28% of patients were free of incontinence episodes, 68% reported improved symptoms (incontinence episodes improved by>50%), and 4% were unchanged. In the BF group, 62% were free of incontinence episodes, and 38% were improved. Results of the digital contraction strength assessments, speculum tests, and manometric measurements showed statistically significant improvement in all variables in both groups after 3 months. CONCLUSION: Four weeks of both intensive group physical therapy or individual biofeedback training followed by an unsupervised home exercise program for 2 mo are effective therapies for female urinary stress incontinence and result in a significantly reduced nocturnal urinary frequency and improved subjective outcome. Only group physical therapy resulted in reduced daytime urinary frequency. BF therapy resulted in a better subjective outcome and higher contraction pressures of the pelvic floor muscles. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2001
Therapeutic Actions Physical Therapy

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Physical Therapy; +108 new citations

108 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: Physical Therapy These pubmed results were generated on 2018/10/23PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.