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Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Sauna Therapy

Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors. 📎

Abstract Title: Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors. Abstract Source: Asian J Sports Med. 2015 Jun ;6(2):e25549. Epub 2015 Jun 20. PMID: 26446307 Abstract Author(s): Peanchai Khamwong, Aatit Paungmali, Ubon Pirunsan, Leonard Joseph Article Affiliation: Peanchai Khamwong Abstract: BACKGROUND: High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 years old, SD = 1.6) were randomly divided into the sauna group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). In the sauna group, subjects received sauna before eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor. The eccentric exercises were conducted on the non-dominant arm by using an isokinetic dynamometer. Pain Intensity (PI), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and passive range of motion of wrist flexion (PF-ROM) and extension (PE-ROM) were measured as pain variables. Grip Strength (GS) and Wrist Extension Strength (WES) were measured as variables of wrist extensor muscle function. All the measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage. RESULTS: The sauna group significantly demonstrated a lower deficit in ROM (passive flexion and passive extension), GS and WES following exercise than that of the control group (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Sauna application prior to the exercise-induced muscle damage demonstrated effectiveness in reduction of sensory impairment (PF-ROM and PE-ROM) and improvement of muscle functions (GS, and WES) in wrist extensor muscle group. Article Published Date : May 31, 2015

Sauna bathing: a warm heart proves beneficial. 📎

Abstract Title: Sauna bathing: a warm heart proves beneficial. Abstract Source: Neth Heart J. 2015 May ;23(5):247-8. PMID: 25911006 Abstract Author(s): E E van der Wall Article Affiliation: E E van der Wall Abstract: No abstract available Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2015

Effect of sauna-based heat acclimation on plasma volume and heart rate variability.

Abstract Title: Effect of sauna-based heat acclimation on plasma volume and heart rate variability. Abstract Source: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2015 Apr ;115(4):785-94. Epub 2014 Nov 29. PMID: 25432420 Abstract Author(s): Jamie Stanley, Aaron Halliday, Shaun D'Auria, Martin Buchheit, Anthony S Leicht Article Affiliation: Jamie Stanley Abstract: PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of post-exercise sauna bathing on plasma volume (PV) expansion and whether such responses can be tracked by changes in heart rate (HR)-based measures. METHODS: Seven, well-trained male cyclists were monitored for 35 consecutive days (17 days baseline training, 10 days training plus sauna, 8 days training). Sauna exposure consisted of 30 min (87°C, 11 % relative humidity) immediately following normal training. Capillary blood samples were collected while resting seated to assess PV changes. HR (HRwake) and vagal-related HR variability (natural logarithm of square root mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals, ln rMSSDwake) were assessed daily upon waking. A sub-maximal cycle test (5 min at 125 W) was performed on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 25, 29, and 35 and HR recovery (HRR60s) and ln rMSSDpostex were assessed post-exercise. Effects were examined using magnitude-based inferences. RESULTS: Compared with baseline, sauna resulted in: (1) peak PV expansion after four exposures with a likely large increase [+17.8 % (90 % confidence limits, 7.4; 29.2)]; (2) reduction of HRwake by a trivial-to-moderate amount [-10.2 % (-15.9; -4.0)]; (3) trivial-to-small changes for ln rMSSDwake [4.3 % (1.9; 6.8)] and ln rMSSDpostex [-2.4 % (-9.1; 4.9)]; and (4) a likely moderate decrease in HRR60s [-15.6 % (-30.9; 3.0)]. Correlations between individual changes in PV and HR measures were all unclear. CONCLUSIONS: Sauna bathing following normal training largely expanded PV in well-trained cyclists after just four exposures. The utility of HR and HRV indices for tracking changes in PV was uncertain. Future studies will clarify mechanisms and performance benefits of post-training sauna bathing. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2015

Effects of far-infrared sauna bathing on recovery from strength and endurance training sessions in men. 📎

Abstract Title: Effects of far-infrared sauna bathing on recovery from strength and endurance training sessions in men. Abstract Source: Springerplus. 2015 ;4:321. Epub 2015 Jul 7. PMID: 26180741 Abstract Author(s): Antti Mero, Jaakko Tornberg, Mari Mäntykoski, Risto Puurtinen Article Affiliation: Antti Mero Abstract: PURPOSE: This study investigated effects of far-infrared sauna (FIRS) bathing on recovery from strength training and endurance training sessions, but also possible differences between FIRS and traditional (TRAD) Finnish sauna bathing. METHODS: Ten healthy physically active male volunteers had on various days either a 60 min hypertrophic strength training session (STS) or a 34-40 min maximal endurance training session (ETS), which was following by 30 min bathing in special FIRS sauna at temperature of 35-50°C and humidity of 25-35%. After the sauna, subjects sat for 30 min at room temperature (21°C and 25-30%humidity). In comparison, 30 min of TRAD took place at 35-50°C and in 60-70% humidity. Performance tests included maximal isometric bench press and leg press, counter movement jump (CMJ) and maximal oxygen uptake on a treadmill. RESULTS: After STS, there were decreases in maximal isometric bench press (p < 0.001), maximal isometric leg press (p < 0.001), CMJ (p < 0.001) and pH (p < 0.001), but increases in heart rate (p < 0.001) and lactate concentration (p < 0.001) as expected. During recovery there were no differences in any variables between FIRS and no sauna bathing (NO SAUNA). Maximal ETS increased oxygen uptake (p < 0.001), heart rate (p < 0.001), lactate concentration (p < 0.001) and decreased pH (p < 0.001) as expected. During recovery at 30 min, CMJ was significantly (p < 0.05) higher (0.34 ± 0.09 m) after FIRS bathing than after sitting with NO SAUNA (0.32 ± 0.0 m). After sauna heart rate was higher (p < 0.05) in TRAD (92 ± 13 beats/min) than in FIRS (71 ± 7 beats/min). CONCLUSION: In conclusion, deep penetration of infrared heat (approximately 3-4 cm into fat tissue and neuromuscular system) with mild temperature (35-50°C), and light humidity (25-35%) during FIRS bathing appears favorable for the neuromuscular system to recover from maximal endurance performance. FIRS bathing is a very light loading for the body and provides a comfortableand relaxing experience. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2014

The effect of repetitive mild hyperthermia on body temperature, the autonomic nervous system, and innate and adaptive immunity. 📎

Abstract Title: The effect of repetitive mild hyperthermia on body temperature, the autonomic nervous system, and innate and adaptive immunity. Abstract Source: Biomed Res. 2015 ;36(2):135-42. PMID: 25876664 Abstract Author(s): Chikako Tomiyama, Mayumi Watanabe, Takashi Honma, Akihiro Inada, Takayoshi Hayakawa, Masae Ryufuku, Toru Abo Article Affiliation: Chikako Tomiyama Abstract: The effect of repetitive mild hyperthermia on body temperature, the autonomic nervous system, and innate and adaptive immunity was investigated using a new hyperthermia treatment system, nanomist sauna (NMS). Six healthy volunteers participated and the concentration of catecholamines and cortisol, and the frequency and function of leukocytes in the peripheral blood were investigated before and after successive 7 days of hyperthermia treatment (20 min/day, 40°C, 100% relative humidity). After treatment, the blood level of adrenaline and cortisol on the 7th day was decreased compared with the 1st day, indicating the suppression of the sympathetic nervous system activity. Moreover, the frequency of CD56(+)NK, CD56(+)NKT and B cells on the 7th day tendedto be increased compared with the 1st day. The frequency of HLA-DR-positive NK and NKT cells and expression of HLA-DR on B and T cells increased. The cytotoxicity of NK cells and proliferative response of B cells were also elevated. The results indicate that repetitive mild hyperthermia treatment might suppress excessive sympathetic dominance and modify immunity. Additionally, because it can provide the same effects as conventional hyperthermia treatments with minimal burden to the body, NMS may be a novel patient- and elderly-friendly hyperthermia treatment for health promotion. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2014

Effects of Waon therapy on chronic fatigue syndrome: a pilot study. 📎

Abstract Title: Effects of Waon therapy on chronic fatigue syndrome: a pilot study. Abstract Source: Intern Med. 2015 ;54(3):333-8. PMID: 25748743 Abstract Author(s): Yuji Soejima, Takao Munemoto, Akinori Masuda, Yuuki Uwatoko, Masaaki Miyata, Chuwa Tei Article Affiliation: Yuji Soejima Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disabling condition of unknown etiology, and no definitive therapy has been identified to date. We developed Waon therapy, a form of thermal therapy using a far-infrared dry sauna, and in this study herein examined its feasibility and safety in patients with CFS. METHODS: Ten consecutive inpatients with CFS stayed in a 60°C sauna for 15 minutes and then rested on a bed under a blanket for an additional 30 minutes outside the sauna room. The treatments were performed once a day, five days a week for four weeks. Perceived fatigue, the primary outcome measure, was evaluated using a numerical rating scale before, during (two weeks after the commencement of therapy) and after therapy. The pain level, evaluated using a numerical rating scale, mood, assessed using the Profile of Mood States questionnaire, and performance status, assessed using a scale developed for CFS patients were also examined before and after therapy. RESULTS: Perceived fatigue significantly decreased after therapy, although no significant reductions were observed during therapy. In addition, a negative mood, including anxiety, depression and fatigue, and the performance status significantly improved after therapy. However, the levels of pain and vigor did not change significantly. No patients reported any adverse effects during the therapy. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that Waon therapy may be a useful and safe treatment for CFS. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2014

The effect of sauna bathing on lipid profile in young, physically active, male subjects. 📎

Abstract Title: The effect of sauna bathing on lipid profile in young, physically active, male subjects. Abstract Source: Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2014 Aug ;27(4):608-18. Epub 2014 Jul 7. PMID: 25001587 Abstract Author(s): Dorota Gryka, Wanda Pilch, Marta Szarek, Zbigniew Szygula, Łukasz Tota Article Affiliation: Dorota Gryka Abstract: OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to evaluate effects of Finnish sauna bathing on lipid profile in healthy, young men. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen male subjects (20-23 years) were subjected to 10 sauna bathing sessions in a Finnish sauna every 1 or 2 days. The mean sauna temperature was 90±2°C, while humidity was 5-16%. Each session consisted of three 15-minute parts and a 2-minute cool-down between them. The following measurements were taken before and after the sauna sessions: body mass, heart rate, body skinfold thickness. The percentage fat content and then, the lean body masswere calculated. Total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, lipoprotein cholesterol LDL and HDL were measured in blood samples. RESULTS: A statistically significant decrease of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol was observed during 3 weeks of sauna treatment and in the week afterwards. A significant decline in triacylglycerols was found directly after the 1st and 24 h directly after the 10th sauna session. After the 10th sauna session the level of HDL cholesterol remained slightly increased, but this change was not statistically significant. A decrease in blood plasma volume was found directly after the 1st and the last sauna bathing session due to perspiration. An adaptive increase in blood plasma volume was also found after the series of 10 sauna sessions. CONCLUSIONS: Ten complete sauna bathing sessions in a Finnish sauna caused a reduction in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol fraction levels during the sessions and a gradual return of these levels to the initial level during the 1st and the 2nd week after the experiment. A small, statistically insignificant increase in HDL-C level and a transient decline in triacylglycerols were observed after those sauna sessions. The positive effect of sauna on lipid profile is similar to the effect that can be obtained through a moderate-intensity physical exercise. Article Published Date : Jul 31, 2014

Changes in the lipid profile of blood serum in women taking sauna baths of various duration.

Abstract Title: Changes in the lipid profile of blood serum in women taking sauna baths of various duration. Abstract Source: Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2010;23(2):167-74. PMID: 20682487 Abstract Author(s): Wanda Pilch, Zbigniew Szyguła, Andrzej T Klimek, Tomasz Pałka, Tomasz Cisoń, Paweł Pilch, Masafumi Torii Article Affiliation: Institute of Human Physiology, University School of Physical Education, Kraków, Poland. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVES: There is little information on lipid metabolism after sauna treatment in the literature. The present research is aimed to determine the influence of sauna baths on fat metabolism in young women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty healthy, eumenhorreic, female volunteers (19-21 yr old) were exposed to Finnish sauna bath seven times every second day. In group I (n = 10) each time the sauna treatment lasted 30 min, whereas in group II (n = 10) 40 min with 5-minute break to cool down. Body mass, heart rate and blood pressure were measured before and after sauna bath. Rectal temperature was monitored during stay in sauna room. Prior to the sauna bath and during its last two minutes the minute oxygen uptake and the level of CO2 exhalation were analyzed in the exhaled air, and the respiratory quotient RQ was calculated. In the blood samples collected before the sauna bath and immediately afterwards hematocrit, hemoglobin, and lipid profile--total lipids, free fatty acids, total free fatty acids, triacylglycerols, total cholesterol (TC), high density lipids (HDL), low density lipids (LDL) were analyzed. RESULTS: Rectal temperature was lower in the last sauna bath than in the first one. Losses of plasma were greater during the seventh bath than during the first one. Acceleration of the metabolism of lipids occurs after every sauna bath. A reduced level of TC and LDLC and a raised level of HDL was observed after repeated sauna baths. CONCLUSION: After 2 weeks of repeated sauna session some changes in total cholesterol and concentration of LDLC were observed, while concentration of HDLC increased after 7th sauna bath in group I. Those kinds of changes may be good prognoses of ischemic heart disease prevention, but further research on the influence of sauna on fat metabolism is needed. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2010

Waon therapy improves the prognosis of patients with chronic heart failure. 📎

Abstract Title: Waon therapy improves the prognosis of patients with chronic heart failure. Abstract Source: J Inorg Biochem. 2009 Nov;103(11):1555-62. Epub 2009 Aug 20. PMID: 19304125 Abstract Author(s): Takashi Kihara, Masaaki Miyata, Tsuyoshi Fukudome, Yoshiyuki Ikeda, Takuro Shinsato, Takuro Kubozono, Shoji Fujita, So Kuwahata, Shuichi Hamasaki, Hiroyuki Torii, Soki Lee, Hitoshi Toda, Chuwa Tei Abstract: BACKGROUND: We developed a Waon therapy (soothing warm therapy) and have previously reported that repeated Waon therapy improves hemodynamics, peripheral vascular function, arrhythmias, and clinical symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Waon therapy on the prognosis of CHF patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 129 patients with CHF in NYHA functional class III or IV who were admitted to our hospital between January 1999 and March 2001. In the Waon therapy group, 64 patients were treated with a far infrared-ray dry sauna at 60 degrees C for 15min and then kept on bed rest with a blanket for 30min. The patients were treated daily for 5 days during admission, and then at least twice a week after discharge. In the control group, 65 patients, matched for age, gender, and NYHA functional class, were treated with traditional CHF therapy. The follow-up time was scheduled for 5 years. RESULTS: Recent, complete follow-up data on each patient were obtained. The overall survival rate was 84.5% (Kaplan-Meier estimate). Twelve patients died in the control group and 8 patients died in the Waon therapy group at 60 months of follow-up. Cardiac events due to heart failure or cardiac death occurred in 68.7% of the control group but only 31.3% of the Waon therapy group (P<0.01) at 60 months of follow-up. CONCLUSION: Waon therapy reduced cardiac events in patients with CHF. This therapy is a promising non-pharmacological treatment for CHF. Article Published Date : Nov 01, 2009

Do sauna therapy and exercise act by raising the availability of tetrahydrobiopterin?

Abstract Title: Do sauna therapy and exercise act by raising the availability of tetrahydrobiopterin? Abstract Source: Med Hypotheses. 2009 Oct ;73(4):610-3. Epub 2009 Jul 5. PMID: 19581054 Abstract Author(s): Martin L Pall Article Affiliation: The Tenth Paradigm Research Group and School of Molecular Biosciences (WSU), 638 NE 41st Ave., Portland, OR 97232-3312, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Sauna therapy has been used to treat a number of different diseases known or thought to have a tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiency. It has been interpreted to act in multiple chemical sensitivity by increasing chemical detoxification and excretion but there is no evidence that this is its main mode of action. Sauna therapy may act to increase BH4 availability via two distinct pathways. Increased blood flow in heated surface tissues leads to increased vascular shear stress, inducing increased activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH-I) in those vascular tissues which will lead to increasing BH4 synthesis. A second mechanism involves the heat shock protein Hsp90, which is induced by even modest heating of mammalian tissues. Sauna heating of these surface tissues may act via Hsp90, which interacts with the GTPCH-I complex and is reported to produce increased GTPCH-I activity by lowering its degradation. The increased consequent availability of BH4 may lead to lowered nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, such as has been reported for the eNOS enzyme. Increased BH4 synthesis in surface tissues of the body will produce increased circulating BH4 which will feed BH4 to other body tissues that may have been BH4 deficient. Similar mechanisms may act in vigorous exercise due to the increased blood shear stresses and possibly also heating of the exercising tissues and heart. There is a large and rapidly increasing number of diseases that are associated with BH4 depletion and these may be candidates for sauna therapy. Such diseases as hypertension, vascular endothelial dysfunction, multiple chemical sensitivity and heart failure are thought to be helped by sauna therapy and chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia may also be helped and there are others that may be good candidates for sauna therapy. Article Published Date : Oct 01, 2009

Effect of regular sauna on epidermal barrier function and stratum corneum water-holding capacity in vivo in humans: a controlled study.

Abstract Title: Effect of regular sauna on epidermal barrier function and stratum corneum water-holding capacity in vivo in humans: a controlled study. Abstract Source: Dermatology. 2008;217(2):173-80. Epub 2008 Jun 5. PMID: 18525205 Abstract Author(s): D Kowatzki, C Macholdt, K Krull, D Schmidt, T Deufel, P Elsner, J W Fluhr Article Affiliation: Skin Physiology Laboratory, Department of Dermatology, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany. Abstract: During the last few years, sauna has become the epitome of wellness. Besides studies in general medicine evaluating the health benefit of sauna, e.g. on the cardiovascular system, no systematic study regarding skin physiology has been published. The present exploratory study was intended to analyse the effect of regular Finnish sauna on skin physiology. The effect of regular sauna bathing was assessed with non-invasive instruments: stratum corneum water-holding capacity, skin redness, transepidermal water loss and surface skin pH were analysed in 41 healthy volunteers, aged 20-49 years, in a group with regular sauna exposure compared to a control group with no regular sauna exposure. A more stable epidermal barrier function, an increase in stratum corneum hydration, a faster recovery of both elevated water loss and skin pH after exposure to 2 x 15 min sauna at 80 degrees C could be demonstrated in volunteers with regular sauna. Heart beat rate and ionic concentration in sweat as well as epidermal blood perfusion showed a training effect under regular sauna. A decrease in casual skin sebum content on the skin surface of the forehead was observed in these volunteers. The present data suggest a protective effect of regular sauna on skin physiology, especially surface pH and stratum corneum water-holding capacity. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2008

The effect of physical therapy on beta-endorphin levels.

Abstract Title: The effect of physical therapy on beta-endorphin levels. Abstract Source: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2007 Jul;100(4):371-82. Epub 2007 May 5. PMID: 17483960 Abstract Author(s): Tamás Bender, György Nagy, István Barna, Ildikó Tefner, Eva Kádas, Pál Géher Article Affiliation: Polyclinic of Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God, Budapest, Hungary. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Beta-endorphin (betaE) is an important reliever of pain. Various stressors and certain modalities of physiotherapy are potent inducers of the release of endogenous betaE to the blood stream. Most forms of exercise also increase blood betaE level, especially when exercise intensity involves reaching the anaerobic threshold and is associated with the elevation of serum lactate level. Age, gender, and mental activity during exercise also may influence betaE levels. Publications on the potential stimulating effect of manual therapy and massage on betaE release are controversial. Sauna, mud bath, and thermal water increase betaE levels through conveying heat to the tissues. The majority of the techniques for electrical stimulation have a similar effect, which is exerted both centrally and--to a lesser extent--peripherally. However, the parameters of electrotherapy have not yet been standardised. The efficacy of analgesia and the improvement of general well-being do not necessarily correlate with betaE level. Although in addition to blood, increased brain and cerebrospinal fluid betaE levels are also associated with pain, the majority of studies have concerned blood betaE levels. In general, various modalities of physical therapy might influence endorphin levels in the serum or in the cerebrospinal fluid--this is usually manifested by elevation with potential mitigation of pain. However, a causal relationship between the elevation of blood, cerebrospinal fluid or brain betaE levels and the onset of the analgesic action cannot be demonstrated with certainty. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2007

Effects of repeated sauna treatment on ventricular arrhythmias in patients with chronic heart failure. 📎

Abstract Title: Effects of repeated sauna treatment on ventricular arrhythmias in patients with chronic heart failure. Abstract Source: Circ J. 2004 Dec;68(12):1146-51. PMID: 15564698 Abstract Author(s): Takashi Kihara, Sadatoshi Biro, Yoshiyuki Ikeda, Tsuyoshi Fukudome, Takuro Shinsato, Akinori Masuda, Masaaki Miyata, Shuichi Hamasaki, Yutaka Otsuji, Shinichi Minagoe, Suminori Akiba, Chuwa Tei Abstract: BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to determine whether repeated 60 degrees C sauna treatment improves cardiac arrhythmias in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients, because ventricular arrhythmias are an important therapeutic target in CHF. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty patients (59+/-3 years) with New York Heart Association functional class II or III CHF and at least 200 premature ventricular contractions (PVCs)/24 h assessed by 24-h Holter recordings were studied. They were randomized into sauna-treated (n=20) or non-treated (n=10) groups. The sauna-treated group underwent a 2-week program of a daily 60 degrees C far infrared-ray dry sauna for 15 min, followed by 30 min bed rest with blankets, for 5 days per week. Patients in the non-treated group had bed rest in a temperature-controlled room (24 degrees C) for 45 min. The total numbers of PVCs/24 h in the sauna-treated group decreased compared with the non-treated group [848+/-415 vs 3,097+/-1,033/24 h, p<0.01]. Heart rate variability (SDNN, standard deviation of normal-to-normal beat interval) increased [142+/-10 (n=16) vs 112+/-11 ms (n=8), p<0.05] and plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentrations decreased [229+/-54 vs 419+/-110 pg/ml, p<0.05] in the sauna-treated group compared with the non-treated group. CONCLUSION: Repeated sauna treatment improves ventricular arrhythmias in patients with CHF. Article Published Date : Dec 01, 2004

Repeated sauna treatment improves vascular endothelial and cardiac function in patients with chronic heart failure. 📎

Abstract Title: Repeated sauna treatment improves vascular endothelial and cardiac function in patients with chronic heart failure. Abstract Source: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Mar 6;39(5):754-9. PMID: 11869837 Abstract Author(s): Takashi Kihara, Sadatoshi Biro, Masakazu Imamura, Shiro Yoshifuku, Kunitsugu Takasaki, Yoshiyuki Ikeda, Yutaka Otuji, Shinichi Minagoe, Yoshifumi Toyama, Chuwa Tei Abstract: OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which 60 degrees C sauna treatment improves cardiac function in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). BACKGROUND: We have previously reported that repeated 60 degrees C sauna treatment improves hemodynamic data and clinical symptoms in patients with CHF. We hypothesized that the sauna restores endothelial function and then improves cardiac function. METHODS: Twenty patients (62 plus minus 15 years) in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II or III CHF were treated in a dry sauna at 60 degrees C for 15 min and then kept on bed rest with a blanket for 30 min, daily for two weeks. Ten patients with CHF, matched for age, gender and NYHA functional class, were placed on a bed in a temperature-controlled (24 degrees C) room for 45 min as the nontreated group. Using high-resolution ultrasound, we measured the diameter of the brachial artery at rest and during reactive hyperemia (percent flow-mediated dilation, %FMD: endothelium-dependent dilation), as well as after sublingual administration of nitroglycerin (%NTG: endothelium-independent dilation). Cardiac function was evaluated by measuring the concentrations of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). RESULTS: Clinical symptoms were improved in 17 of 20 patients after two weeks of sauna therapy. The %FMD after two-week sauna treatment significantly increased from the baseline value, whereas the %NTG-induced dilation did not. Concentrations of BNP after the two-week sauna treatment decreased significantly. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the change in %FMD and the percent improvement in BNP concentrations in the sauna-treated group. In contrast, none of the variables changed at the two-week interval in the nontreated group. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated sauna treatment improves vascular endothelial function, resulting in an improvement in cardiac function and clinical symptoms. Article Published Date : Mar 06, 2002

The use of the sauna for disease prevention in the workers of enterprises with chemical and physical occupational hazards

Abstract Title: [The use of the sauna for disease prevention in the workers of enterprises with chemical and physical occupational hazards]. Abstract Source: Vrach Delo. 1991 May(5):93-5. PMID: 1866932 Abstract Author(s): I A Parpaleĭ, L G Prokof'eva, V G Obertas Abstract: It was found that being a hygienic procedure sauna essentially improves well-being of the workers, activates the cardiovascular system and mechanism of general adaptation of the body. Sauna increased excretion with sweat fluid of toxic substances (lead, thiuram, captax, sulphenamide C) that penetrated the body during work. Sauna is recommended as an effective procedure in conditions where chemical and physical factors are the leading professional noxae. Article Published Date : May 01, 1991
Therapeutic Actions Sauna Therapy

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Safety and tolerability of sauna detoxification for the protracted withdrawal symptoms of substance abuse.

Related Articles Safety and tolerability of sauna detoxification for the protracted withdrawal symptoms of substance abuse. J Int Med Res. 2018 Nov;46(11):4480-4499 Authors: Lennox RD, Cecchini-Sternquist M Abstract OBJECTIVE: Protracted drug withdrawal symptoms can last months or years after drug cessation, often precipitating a return to substance misuse. We evaluated the safety and preliminary health benefits of a unique chemical exposure regimen based on exercise, sauna and therapeutic nutrients. METHODS: This was a prospective evaluation of 109 individuals sequentially enrolled into a sauna detoxification component of a multi-modal, long-term residential substance abuse treatment centre. RESULTS: Data from medical charts, client self-reports and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) responses indicated that the Hubbard sauna detoxification method was well tolerated, with a 99% completion rate, including one human immunodeficiency virus and nine hepatitis C positive clients. There were no cases of dehydration, overhydration or heat illness. Statistically significant improvements were seen in both mental and physical SF-36 scores at regimen completion, as well as in Addiction Severity Index and Global Appraisal of Individual Needs Short Screener change scores at rehabilitation program discharge, compared with enrolment. CONCLUSIONS: The regimen lacked serious adverse events, had a very low discontinuation rate and high client-reported satisfaction. The SF-36 data indicated improved physical and emotional symptoms. Therefore, broader investigation of this sauna-based treatment regimen is warranted. PMID: 30209965 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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