Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Low-Protein Diet

Long-term effects of calorie or protein restriction on serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 concentration in humans.

Abstract Title: Long-term effects of calorie or protein restriction on serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 concentration in humans. Abstract Source: Thromb Res. 2009 Mar;123(5):740-4. Epub 2008 Sep 10. PMID: 18843793 Abstract Author(s): Luigi Fontana, Edward P Weiss, Dennis T Villareal, Samuel Klein, John O Holloszy Article Affiliation: Division of Geriatrics&Nutritional Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Reduced function mutations in the insulin/IGF-I signaling pathway increase maximal lifespan and health span in many species. Calorie restriction (CR) decreases serum IGF-1 concentration by ~40%, protects against cancer and slows aging in rodents. However, the long-term effects of CR with adequate nutrition on circulating IGF-1 levels in humans are unknown. Here we report data from two long-term CR studies (1 and 6 years) showing that severe CR without malnutrition did not change IGF-1 and IGF-1 : IGFBP-3 ratio levels in humans. In contrast, total and free IGF-1 concentrations were significantly lower in moderately protein-restricted individuals. Reducing protein intake from an average of 1.67 g kg(-1) of body weight per day to 0.95 g kg(-1) of body weight per day for 3 weeks in six volunteers practicing CR resulted in a reduction in serum IGF-1 from 194 ng mL(-1) to 152 ng mL(-1). These findings demonstrate that, unlike in rodents, long-term severe CR does not reduce serum IGF-1 concentration and IGF-1 : IGFBP-3 ratio in humans. In addition, our data provide evidence that protein intake is a key determinant of circulating IGF-1 levels in humans, and suggest that reduced protein intake may become an important component of anticancer and anti-aging dietary interventions. Article Published Date : Mar 01, 2009

Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. I. Nitrogen balance studies. 1

Abstract Title: Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. I. Nitrogen balance studies. Abstract Source: Clin Nephrol. 1975;3(5):187-94. PMID: 1149343 Abstract Author(s): J Bergström, P Fürst, L O Norée Abstract: Twenty-six nitrogen balance studies were performed in 15 patients with severe uremia (Ccr mean value 5.1, range 2.3-8.5 ml/min) treated with an unselected protein-poor (16-20 g protein/day corresponding to 2.6-3.2 g N/day) diet and oral supply of the essential amino acids including histidine (2.6 g N/day). The general condition improved and the concentration of serum urea nitrogen decreased. The nitrogen balance, corrected for changes in total urea pool, was negative on the diet alone,-1.46 plus or minus 1.15 g N/day (mean plus or minus SD), but was positive when the essential amino acids were supplied, plus 0.84 plus or minus 0.68 g N/day. In four patients studied after 3 to 26 months of diet and amino acid therapy, during which time a further deterioriation of the renal function had occurred, the nitrogen balance was around zero in three and negative in one patient (-1.2 g N/day). The results show that it is possible with our new regimen to attain positive nitrogen balance or nitrogen equilibrium in severely uremic patients without excessive accumulation of urea in the body fluids.   Article Published Date : Jan 01, 1975

Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. II. Clinical results of long-term treatment.

Abstract Title: Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. II. Clinical results of long-term treatment. Abstract Source: Clin Nephrol. 1975;3(5):195-203. PMID: 1149344 Abstract Author(s): L O Norée, J Bergström Abstract: Twenty-six uremic patients - serum urea nitrogen (SUN) 110 MG/100 ml plus or minus 22.8 (mean plus or minus SD), serum cretinine (S-Creat) 13.2 mg/100 ml plus or minus 2.27, ratio SUN/S-Creat 8.6 plus or minus 2.26, and endogenous creatinine clearance (Ccr) 3.86 plus or minus 1.41 ml/min - were treated for three months or longer with an unselected protein-poor (16-20 g protein/day) diet with oral supply of the essential amino acids including histidine in high doses as coated tablets. The amino acids were instituted after an initial diet only period (mean 0.4 months). The average treatment time was 8.4 months (range 2.7-33.6). An improvement of the general condition was obtained, persisting for several months. SUN and SUN/S-Creat decreased on the diet alone, continued to decrease after one month, and increased slightly again after three months of treatment, but did not reach the initial levels for several months in spite of an almost doubled nitrogen intake. S-Creat increased after six months indicating a further deterioration of the renal function. In patients with initially low serum total protein (smaller than 6.5 g/100 ml, 9 patients), albumin (smaller than 3.5 g/100 ml, 10 patients), and total iron-binding capacity (smaller than 260 mug/100 ml, 11 patients) the values increased after one month on amino acids and were thereafter stable. No signs of bleeding tendency, progressive muscle atrophy, or progressive peripheral neuropathy were observed. - Five patients died due to cardiovascular maladies. A further 13 patients were withdrawn for medical reasons (overhydration, 4 patients; hypertension, 1 patient; nausea and vomiting, 7 patients; and pericarditis, 1 patient). - The renal function improved in one patient. Four patients received home dialysis training, three a kidney transplant. - The results indicate that it is possible to keep severely uremic patients free from uremic symptoms, counteract protein depletion, and even improve the nutritional status during long-term treatment with an unselected protein-poor diet supplementd with essential amino acids.   Article Published Date : Jan 01, 1975
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Low-Protein Diet

NCBI pubmed

Hypolipidemic effect of XH601 on hamsters of Hyperlipidemia and its potential mechanism.

Related Articles Hypolipidemic effect of XH601 on hamsters of Hyperlipidemia and its potential mechanism. Lipids Health Dis. 2017 May 02;16(1):85 Authors: Zhao MJ, Wang SS, Jiang Y, Wang Y, Shen H, Xu P, Xiang H, Xiao H Abstract BACKGROUND: The novel compound XH601 is a synthesized derivative of formononetin. The present study was to investigate the hypolipidemia effect and potential mechanism of XH601. METHODS: Male Golden Syrian hamsters were induced by high-fat diet (HFD) for eight weeks and the hyperlipidemic model was established successfully. After XH601 treatment, serum and hepatic biochemistry parameters of hamsters were detected and the effect of XH601 on adipose tissue was also analyzed. Furthermore, 3 T3-L1 cell differentiation by Oil-Red-O staining was observed and the mRNA and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) were measured by qRT-PCR and Western-blot in mature adipocytes. RESULTS: The in vivo results suggest that XH601 significantly decreased the adipose weight and levels of serum triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), apolipoprotein B (Apo-B), apolipoprotein E (Apo-E), while increased serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C). The in vitro results implied that XH601 up-regulated the mRNA and protein expression of both PPARα and PPARβ/δ in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that XH601 exhibited strong ability to improve the dyslipidemia in hamsters fed with high-fat diet. The potential mechanism of XH601 was associated with the up-regulation of PPARα and PPARβ/δ mRNA and protein expression. PMID: 28464894 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Goat sausages containing chitosan towards a healthier product: microbiological, physico-chemical textural evaluation.

Related Articles Goat sausages containing chitosan towards a healthier product: microbiological, physico-chemical textural evaluation. Food Funct. 2016 Sep 14;7(9):4020-4029 Authors: do Amaral DS, Cardelle-Cobas A, do Nascimento BM, Madruga MS, Pintado MM Abstract Goat meat is extensively known for its interesting nutritional value and for being an important source of protein with high quality. Its food derivatives are, therefore, a good alternative to develop new products addressed to health conscious consumers. In this work, a healthier goat product, namely, a low fat fresh sausage, was produced with the objective of evaluating the effect of inclusion of chitosan on quality, stability and shelf life. Sausages containing 2% chitosan were formulated with different fat levels (5%, 12.5% and 20%, w/w) and stored at 4 °C for 15 days. Results indicated the incorporation of 2% (w/w) chitosan was technologically feasible, due to the reduction of microbial growth and lipid oxidation, as well as the enhancement of red color. Additionally, the treated samples improved all the characteristics associated with cooking, showing the ability to bind water and fat and acquiring a firmer texture compared with control samples. Additionally, the reduction of fat content is technologically feasible without negative influences on the final product. PMID: 27711901 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]