Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Low Starch-Low Dairy

Low Starch/Low Dairy Diet Results in Successful Treatment of Obesity and Co-Morbidities Linked to Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). 📎

Abstract Title: Low Starch/Low Dairy Diet Results in Successful Treatment of Obesity and Co-Morbidities Linked to Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Abstract Source: J Obes Weight Loss Ther. 2015 Apr ;5(2). PMID: 26225266 Abstract Author(s): Jennifer L Phy, Ali M Pohlmeier, Jamie A Cooper, Phillip Watkins, Julian Spallholz, Kitty S Harris, Abbey B Berenson, Mallory Boylan Article Affiliation: Jennifer L Phy Abstract: BACKGROUND: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) affects approximately 15% of reproductive-age women and increases risk of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, cancer and infertility. Hyperinsulinemia is believed to contribute to or worsen all of these conditions, and increases androgens in women with PCOS. Carbohydrates are the main stimulators of insulin release, but research shows that dairy products and starches elicit greater postprandial insulin secretion than non-starchy vegetables and fruits. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an 8-week low-starch/low-dairy diet results in weight loss, increased insulin sensitivity, and reduced testosterone in women with PCOS. METHODS: Prospective 8-week dietary intervention using an ad libitum low starch/low dairy diet in 24 overweight and obese women (BMI≥ 25 kg/m(2) and ≤ 45 kg/m(2)) with PCOS. Diagnosis of PCOS was based on the Rotterdam criteria. Weight, BMI, Waist Circumference (WC), Waist-to-Height Ratio (WHtR), fasting and 2-hour glucose and insulin, homeostasis model assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), HbA1c, total and free testosterone, and Ferriman-Gallwey scores were measured before and after the 8-week intervention. RESULTS: There was a reduction in weight (-8.61± 2.34 kg, p<0.001), BMI (-3.25± 0.88 kg/m(2), p<0.001), WC (-8.4± 3.1 cm, p<0.001), WHtR (-0.05± 0.02 inches, p<0.001), fasting insulin (-17.0± 13.6 μg/mL, p<0.001) and 2-hour insulin (-82.8± 177.7 μg/mL, p=0.03), and HOMA-IR (-1.9 ± 1.2, p<0.001) after diet intervention. Total testosterone (-10.0± 17.0 ng/dL, p=0.008), free testosterone (-1.8 pg/dL, p=0.043) and Ferriman-Gallwey scores (-2.1 ± 2.7 points (p=0.001) were also reduced from pre- to post-intervention. CONCLUSION: An 8-week low-starch/low-dairy diet resulted in weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity and reduced testosterone in women with PCOS. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2015
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Low Starch-Low Dairy

NCBI pubmed

High intake of dairy during energy restriction does not affect energy balance or the intestinal microflora compared with low dairy intake in overweight individuals in a randomized controlled trial.

Related Articles High intake of dairy during energy restriction does not affect energy balance or the intestinal microflora compared with low dairy intake in overweight individuals in a randomized controlled trial. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2018 Jan;43(1):1-10 Authors: Bendtsen LQ, Blædel T, Holm JB, Lorenzen JK, Mark AB, Kiilerich P, Kristiansen K, Astrup A, Larsen LH Abstract During weight loss, dairy calcium is proposed to accelerate weight and fat-mass loss through increased fecal fat excretion. The primary objective was to investigate if a high-dairy energy-restricted diet is superior to low dairy in terms of changes in body weight, body composition, and fecal fat excretion over 24 weeks. Secondary objectives included fecal energy and calcium excretion, resting energy expenditure, blood pressure, lipid metabolism, and gut microbiota. In a randomized, parallel-arm intervention study, 11 men and 69 women (body mass index, 30.6 ± 0.3 kg/m2; age, 44 ± 1 years) were allocated to a 500-kcal (2100 kJ) -deficit diet that was either high (HD: 1500 mg calcium/day) or low (LD: 600 mg calcium/day) in dairy products for 24 weeks. Habitual calcium intake was ∼1000 mg/day. Body weight loss (HD: -6.6 ± 1.3 kg, LD: -7.9 ± 1.5 kg, P = 0.73), fat-mass loss (HD: -7.8% ± 1.3%, LD: -8.5% ± 1.1%, P = 0.76), changes in fecal fat excretion (HD: -0.57 ± 0.76 g, LD: 0.46 ± 0.70 g, P = 0.12), and microbiota composition were similar for the groups over 24 weeks. However, total fat-mass loss was positively associated with relative abundance of Papillibacter (P = 0.017) independent of diet group. Consumption of a high-dairy diet did not increase fecal fat or accelerate weight and fat-mass loss beyond energy restriction over 24 weeks in overweight and obese adults with a habitual calcium intake of ∼1000 mg/day. However, this study indicates that Papillibacter is involved in body compositional changes. PMID: 28829923 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]