CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Hyper or Normobaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyper- or normobaric oxygen therapy to treat migraine and cluster headache pain. Cochrane review

Abstract Title: [Hyper- or normobaric oxygen therapy to treat migraine and cluster headache pain. Cochrane review]. Abstract Source: Schmerz. 2008 Apr;22(2):129-32, 134-6. PMID: 17885769 Abstract Author(s): A Schnabel, M Bennet, F Schuster, N Roewer, P Kranke Article Affiliation: Klinik und Poliklinik für Anästhesiologie und operative Intensivmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Münster, Germany. Abstract: BACKGROUND: The aim of this systematic review was to assess the benefits and harms of supplemental oxygen (HBOT/NBOT) for treating and preventing migraine and cluster headaches. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All randomized trials comparing the effect of supplemental oxygen on migraine or cluster headache with those that exclude supplemental oxygen were included in this review. The systematic search included all relevant sources according to the paradigms of the Cochrane Collaboration. Data were analyzed with RevMan 4.2. RESULTS: Nine trials involving 201 participants satisfied the inclusion criteria. HBOT was effective in relieving an acute migraine and seemed to be sufficient in the treatment of an acute cluster attack. NBOT was effective in terminating acute cluster headache compared to sham treatment, but not in comparison to sublingual ergotamine. There was no evidence for any prophylactic effects. Serious adverse effects were not noted in the trials investigated. CONCLUSIONS: There is some evidence that HBOT is effective for termination of acute migraine. NBOT was similarly effective in cluster headache, however with sparse data. Because of costs and poor availability HBOT cannot be regarded as a routine therapy. Further indications in the case of treatment failure using standard therapy need to be defined based on data of future clinical trials. Article Published Date : Apr 01, 2008
Therapeutic Actions Hyper or Normobaric Oxygen


Solvation Effects on the Permeation and Aging Performance of PIM-1 based MMMs for Gas Separation.

Related Articles Solvation Effects on the Permeation and Aging Performance of PIM-1 based MMMs for Gas Separation. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2019 Jan 17;: Authors: Hou R, Smith SJD, Wood CD, Mulder RJ, Lau CH, Wang H, Hill MR Abstract Membranes are particularly attractive for lowering the energy intensity of separations as they eliminate phase changes. Whilst many tantalising polymers are known, limitations in selectivity and stability somewhat preclude further development. Mixed-matrix membranes may address these shortcomings. Key to realisation is the intimate mixing between the polymer and the additive, to eliminate non-selective transport, improve selectivity, and resist physical aging. Polymers of Intrinsic Microporosity (PIMs) have inherently promising gas transport properties. Here, we show that porous additives can improve transport and resist aging in PIM-1. We develop a simple, low cost and scalable hyper-crosslinked polymer (Poly-dichloroxylene, pDCX), which was hydroxylated to form an intimate mixture with the polar PIM-1. Solvent variation allowed control of physical aging rates, and improved selectivity for smaller gases. This detailed study has allowed many interactions within mixed matrix membranes to be directly elucidated, and presents a practical means to stabilise porous polymers for separation applications. PMID: 30653301 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

A novel bioreactor for combined magnetic resonance spectroscopy and optical imaging of metabolism in 3D cell cultures.

Related Articles A novel bioreactor for combined magnetic resonance spectroscopy and optical imaging of metabolism in 3D cell cultures. Magn Reson Med. 2019 Jan 16;: Authors: Cox BL, Erickson-Bhatt S, Szulczewski JM, Squirrell JM, Ludwig KD, Macdonald EB, Swader R, Ponik SM, Eliceiri KW, Fain SB Abstract PURPOSE: Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of endogenous fluorescent metabolites permits the measurement of cellular metabolism in cell, tissue and animal models. In parallel, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of dynamic nuclear (hyper)polarized (DNP) 13 C-pyruvate enables measurement of metabolism at larger in vivo scales. Presented here are the design and initial application of a bioreactor that connects these 2 metabolic imaging modalities in vitro, using 3D cell cultures. METHODS: The model fitting for FLIM data analysis and the theory behind a model for the diffusion of pyruvate into a collagen gel are detailed. The device is MRI-compatible, including an optical window, a temperature control system and an injection port for the introduction of contrast agents. Three-dimensional printing, computer numerical control machining and laser cutting were used to fabricate custom parts. RESULTS: Performance of the bioreactor is demonstrated for 4 T1 murine breast cancer cells under glucose deprivation. Mean nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence lifetimes were 10% longer and hyperpolarized 13 C lactate:pyruvate (Lac:Pyr) ratios were 60% lower for glucose-deprived 4 T1 cells compared to 4 T1 cells in normal medium. Looking at the individual components of the NADH fluorescent lifetime, τ1 (free NADH) showed no significant change, while τ2 (bound NADH) showed a significant increase, suggesting that the increase in mean lifetime was due to a change in bound NADH. CONCLUSION: A novel bioreactor that is compatible with, and can exploit the benefits of, both FLIM and 13 C MRS in 3D cell cultures for studies of cell metabolism has been designed and applied. PMID: 30652350 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Phylogenetic analysis of Infectious Bursal Disease viruses according to newly proposed model of classification into geno-groups.

Related Articles Phylogenetic analysis of Infectious Bursal Disease viruses according to newly proposed model of classification into geno-groups. J Infect Public Health. 2019 Jan 13;: Authors: Ali Khan RS, Habib M, Ali W, Salah Ud Din Shah M, Ashraf A, Ali Tahir Z, Helal ZH, Khan MI, Mahboob S, A-Al-Ghanim K, Al-Misned F Abstract BACKGROUND: Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is the causative agent of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD), the disease causes immunosuppression which leads to secondary infections among rearing poultry flocks. Characterization of the virus is important for its control and eradication. The circulating IBDVs are classified on the basis of their antigenic and pathogenic properties. The virus is categorised as classical, variant and very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV). IBDV is a non-envelop, icosahedral double stranded virus. Viral protein 2 (VP2) is the major structural protein of capsid that determines the host-pathogen relationship. The aim of this study was to characterise the IBD virus of Pak-Asian region. METHODOLOGY: IBDV suspected flocks were examined in Punjab, Pakistan from 2014-2018. Two hundred and fifty samples were collected with complete history of the disease. The suspected samples were collected from broiler, layer and rural poultry farms. RNA was extracted and hyper-variable region of VP2 gene was amplified using specific primers. Nucleotide sequence of the VP2 gene was determined and its Amino Acid sequence was deduced. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis was also performed. RESULTS: The current classifications based in a hyper-variable region of the capsid protein VP2 (hvVP2), classification of IBDVs is split into newly proposed geno-groups according to Jackwood group. Among these prevailing, some IBDVs are limited geographically whereas, others are reported cosmopolitan. Genetic alterations are continuously playing role in evolution of new strains of the virus. CONCLUSION: During this study it was found that isolates of IBDV fall in first three geno-groups. Most of the geno-groups are prevalent around the world, whereas the mutated and re-assorted ones are confined in particular areas of the globe. PMID: 30651212 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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