Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Hyper or Normobaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyper- or normobaric oxygen therapy to treat migraine and cluster headache pain. Cochrane review

Abstract Title: [Hyper- or normobaric oxygen therapy to treat migraine and cluster headache pain. Cochrane review]. Abstract Source: Schmerz. 2008 Apr;22(2):129-32, 134-6. PMID: 17885769 Abstract Author(s): A Schnabel, M Bennet, F Schuster, N Roewer, P Kranke Article Affiliation: Klinik und Poliklinik für Anästhesiologie und operative Intensivmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Münster, Germany. Abstract: BACKGROUND: The aim of this systematic review was to assess the benefits and harms of supplemental oxygen (HBOT/NBOT) for treating and preventing migraine and cluster headaches. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All randomized trials comparing the effect of supplemental oxygen on migraine or cluster headache with those that exclude supplemental oxygen were included in this review. The systematic search included all relevant sources according to the paradigms of the Cochrane Collaboration. Data were analyzed with RevMan 4.2. RESULTS: Nine trials involving 201 participants satisfied the inclusion criteria. HBOT was effective in relieving an acute migraine and seemed to be sufficient in the treatment of an acute cluster attack. NBOT was effective in terminating acute cluster headache compared to sham treatment, but not in comparison to sublingual ergotamine. There was no evidence for any prophylactic effects. Serious adverse effects were not noted in the trials investigated. CONCLUSIONS: There is some evidence that HBOT is effective for termination of acute migraine. NBOT was similarly effective in cluster headache, however with sparse data. Because of costs and poor availability HBOT cannot be regarded as a routine therapy. Further indications in the case of treatment failure using standard therapy need to be defined based on data of future clinical trials. Article Published Date : Apr 01, 2008
Therapeutic Actions Hyper or Normobaric Oxygen

NCBI pubmed

The European Eye Epidemiology spectral-domain optical coherence tomography classification of macular diseases for epidemiological studies.

Related Articles The European Eye Epidemiology spectral-domain optical coherence tomography classification of macular diseases for epidemiological studies. Acta Ophthalmol. 2018 Sep 22;: Authors: Gattoussi S, Buitendijk GHS, Peto T, Leung I, Schmitz-Valckenberg S, Oishi A, Wolf S, Deák G, Delcourt C, Klaver CCW, Korobelnik JF, European Eye Epidemiology (E3) consortium Abstract PURPOSE: The aim of the European Eye Epidemiology (E3) consortium was to develop a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT)-based classification for macular diseases to standardize epidemiological studies. METHODS: A European panel of vitreoretinal disease experts and epidemiologists belonging to the E3 consortium was assembled to define a classification for SD-OCT imaging of the macula. A series of meeting was organized, to develop, test and finalize the classification. First, grading methods used by the different research groups were presented and discussed, and a first version of classification was proposed. This first version was then tested on a set of 50 SD-OCT images in the Bordeaux and Rotterdam centres. Agreements were analysed and discussed with the panel of experts and a final version of the classification was produced. RESULTS: Definitions and classifications are proposed for the structure assessment of the vitreomacular interface (visibility of vitreous interface, vitreomacular adhesion, vitreomacular traction, epiretinal membrane, full-thickness macular hole, lamellar macular hole, macular pseudo-hole) and of the retina (retinoschisis, drusen, pigment epithelium detachment, hyper-reflective clumps, retinal pigment epithelium atrophy, intraretinal cystoid spaces, intraretinal tubular changes, subretinal fluid, subretinal material). Classifications according to size and location are defined. Illustrations of each item are provided, as well as the grading form. CONCLUSION: The E3 SD-OCT classification has been developed to harmonize epidemiological studies. This homogenization will allow comparing and sharing data collection between European and international studies. PMID: 30242982 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Are we choosing the correct FSH starting dose during controlled ovarian stimulation for intrauterine insemination cycles? Potential application of a nomogram based on woman's age and markers of ovarian reserve.

Related Articles Are we choosing the correct FSH starting dose during controlled ovarian stimulation for intrauterine insemination cycles? Potential application of a nomogram based on woman's age and markers of ovarian reserve. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2018 Sep 21;: Authors: Di Paola R, Garzon S, Giuliani S, Laganà AS, Noventa M, Parissone F, Zorzi C, Raffaelli R, Ghezzi F, Franchi M, Zaffagnini S Abstract PURPOSE: To evaluate the potential application of a nomogram based on woman's age and ovarian reserve markers as a tool to optimize the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) starting dose in intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis enrolling 179 infertile women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation (COS), followed by IUI. Each woman received an FSH starting dose according to clinical decision. After collecting data about COS and IUI procedures, we calculated the FSH starting dose according to the nomogram. The main outcomes measured were women's baseline characteristics, COS, and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: The FSH starting dose calculated by the nomogram was significantly lower than the one actually prescribed (p < 0.001), in only 14.8% of the cycles nomogram calculated a higher starting dose. When gonadotropin dose was decreased during COS, and similarly in case of hyper-response (more than two follicles ≥ 16 mm retrieved), the FSH starting dose calculated by the nomogram would have been lower in most of the cases (81.8% and 48.8%, respectively). Conversely, when gonadotropin dose was increased during COS and in case of low ovarian response (no follicle ≥ 16 mm retrieved), the FSH starting dose calculated by the nomogram would have been lower in most of the cases (64.7% and 100%, respectively); in these groups median anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) level was 5.62 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: The application of this nomogram in IUI cycles would lead to a more tailored FSH starting dose and improved cost-effectiveness, although in PCOS women, particularly the ones with high AMH, it does not seem adequate. PMID: 30242498 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Comparison of a sports-hydration drink containing high amylose starch with usual hydration practice in Australian rules footballers during intense summer training.

Related Articles Comparison of a sports-hydration drink containing high amylose starch with usual hydration practice in Australian rules footballers during intense summer training. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2018 Sep 21;15(1):46 Authors: O'Connell SM, Woodman RJ, Brown IL, Vincent DJ, Binder HJ, Ramakrishna BS, Young GP Abstract BACKGROUND: Fluid deficits exceeding 1.6% can lead to physical and cognitive impairment in athletes. Sport drinks used by athletes are often hyper-osmolar but this is known to be suboptimal for rehydration in medical settings and does not utilize colonic absorptive capacity. Colonic absorption can be enhanced by fermentative production of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) from substrates such as high amylose maize starch (HAMS). This study therefore compared, in elite Australian Football League (AFL) players at the height of outdoor summer training, a novel dual-action sports oral rehydration strategy that contained HAMS as well as glucose, to their usual rehydration practices (Control). The primary outcome markers of hydration were hematocrit and body weight. METHODS: A randomized single-blind crossover study was undertaken in thirty-one AFL players; twenty-seven completed the study which was conducted on four days (two days in the Intervention arm and two in Control arm). The Intervention arm was comprised a 50-100 g evening preload of an acetylated HAMS (Ingredion Pty Ltd) followed by consumption of a specially formulated sports oral rehydration solution (SpORS) drink during intense training and recovery. Players followed their usual hydration routine in the Control arm. Quantitative assessments of body weight, hematocrit and urine specific gravity were made at three time-points on each day of training: pre-training, post-training (90 min), and at end of recovery (30-60 min later). GPS tracking monitored player exertion. RESULTS: Across the three time-points, hematocrit was significantly lower and body weight significantly higher in Intervention compared to Control arms (p < 0.02 and p = 0.001 respectively, mixed effects model). Weights were significantly heavier at all three assessment points for Intervention compared to Control arms (Δ = 0.30 ± 0.13, p = 0.02 pre-training; Δ = 0.43 ± 0.14, p = 0.002 post training; and Δ = 0.68 ± 0.14, p < 0.001 for recovery). Between the pre-training and end-of-recovery assessments, the Control arm lost 0.80 kg overall compared with 0.12 kg in the Intervention arm, an 85% lower reduction of bodyweight across the assessment period. CONCLUSION: The combination of the significantly lower hematocrit and increased body weight in the Intervention arm represents better hydration not only at the end of training as well as following a recovery period but also at its commencement. The magnitude of the benefit seems sufficient to have an impact on performance and further studies to test this possibility are now indicated. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Trial is listed on the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ( ACTRN 12613001373763 ). PMID: 30241477 [PubMed - in process]