Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Aquatic therapy

Aquatherapy for neurodegenerative disorders. 📎

Abstract Title: Aquatherapy for neurodegenerative disorders. Abstract Source: J Huntingtons Dis. 2014 ;3(1):5-11. PMID: 25062761 Abstract Author(s): Alyson R Plecash, Blair R Leavitt Article Affiliation: Alyson R Plecash Abstract: Aquatherapy is used for rehabilitation and exercise; water provides a challenging, yet safe exercise environment for many special populations. We have reviewed the use of aquatherapy programs in four neurodegenerative disorders: Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. Results support the use of aquatherapy in Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis, however further evidence is required to make specific recommendations in all of the aforementioned disorders. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2013

Clinicians' perceptions of the benefits of aquatic therapy for young children with autism: a preliminary study.

Abstract Title: Clinicians' perceptions of the benefits of aquatic therapy for young children with autism: a preliminary study. Abstract Source: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Aug;91(8):3232-5. Epub 2006 May 23. PMID: 16938823 Abstract Author(s): Darcy S Vonder Hulls, Lisa K Walker, Janet M Powell Abstract: OBJECTIVE: This purpose of this study was to identify clinicians' perceptions of the benefits of aquatic therapy for young children with autism. METHODS: Eighteen aquatic occupational therapists treating young children with autism responded to a survey soliciting their opinions on changes in skill performance resulting from aquatic therapy. RESULTS: A majority of clinicians reported a substantial increase in swim skills, attention,muscle strength, balance, tolerating touch, initiating/maintaining eye contact, and water safety. CONCLUSION: The impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions seen in children with autism can be wide-ranging and outcomes can be difficult to operationally define and measure. In this preliminary study, clinicians identified the areas they perceived as improving as a result of aquatic therapy. This information could help narrow the field of likely outcomes as a first step toward studies of the effectiveness of aquatic therapy for children with autism. Article Published Date : Aug 01, 2006
Therapeutic Actions Aquatic therapy

NCBI pubmed

Assessment of variability in traction interventions for patients with low back pain: a systematic review.

Related Articles Assessment of variability in traction interventions for patients with low back pain: a systematic review. Chiropr Man Therap. 2018;26:35 Authors: Alrwaily M, Almutiri M, Schneider M Abstract Background: Previous systematic reviews have concluded that lumbar traction is not effective for patients with low back pain (LBP), yet many clinicians continue to assert its clinical effectiveness. Objective: To systematically identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of traction and explore the variability of traction interventions used in each RCT. Method: A literature search started in September 2016 to retrieve systematic reviews and individual RCTs of lumbar traction. The term "lumbar traction" and other key words were used in the following databases: Cochrane Registry, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. The retrieved systematic reviews were used to extract individual RCTs. The most current systematic review included RCTs from inception until August 2012. We performed an additional literature search to update this systematic review with newer RCTs published between September 2012 and December 2016. All of the identified RCTs were combined and summarized into a single evidence table. Results: We identified a total of 37 traction RCTs that varied greatly in their method of traction intervention. The RCTs included several types of traction: mechanical (57%), auto-traction (16%), manual (10.8%), gravitational (8.1%) and aquatic (5.4%). There was also great variability in the types of traction force, rhythm, session duration and treatment frequency used in the RCTs. Patient characteristics were a mixture of acute, subacute and chronic LBP; with or without sciatica. Conclusion: There is wide variability in the type of traction, traction parameters and patient characteristics found among the RCTs of lumbar traction. The variability may call into question the conclusion that lumbar traction has little no or value on clinical outcomes. Also, this variability emphasizes the need for targeted delivery methods of traction that match appropriate dosages with specific subgroups of patients with LBP. PMID: 30237870 [PubMed - in process]