Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Yawning

Yawn, yawn, yawn, yawn; yawn, yawn, yawn! The social, evolutionary and neuroscientific facets of contagious yawning.

Abstract Title: Yawn, yawn, yawn, yawn; yawn, yawn, yawn! The social, evolutionary and neuroscientific facets of contagious yawning. Abstract Source: Front Neurol Neurosci. 2010;28:107-12. Epub 2010 Mar 26. PMID: 20357468 Abstract Author(s): Steven M Platek Article Affiliation: Georgia Gwinnett College, Lawrenceville, Ga. 30043, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Contagious yawning is a common phenomenon affecting upwards of 60% of healthy humans. It has also been observed, at a lesser rate, in great apes and other primates. Here I summarize the suggestion that contagious yawning is a primitive expression of social cognition, namely empathy. Susceptibility to contagious yawning is correlated with the speed in recognizing one's own face, theory of mind processing, and is also associated with activation in regions of the brain that have been associated with social cognitive processes. This suggests that contagious yawning may be an evolutionarily old process that begot a higher level of social cognition in certain species. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2010

Contagious yawning in chimpanzees. 📎

Abstract Title: Contagious yawning in chimpanzees. Abstract Source: Gynecol Oncol. 2009 Jun;113(3):374-8. Epub 2009 Mar 25. PMID: 15801606 Abstract Author(s): James R Anderson, Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi, Tetsuro Matsuzawa Article Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Six adult female chimpanzees were shown video scenes of chimpanzees repeatedly yawning or of chimpanzees showing open-mouth facial expressions that were not yawns. Two out of the six females showed significantly higher frequencies of yawning in response to yawn videos; no chimpanzees showed the inverse. Three infant chimpanzees that accompanied their mothers did not yawn at all. These data are highly reminiscent of the contagious yawning effects reported for humans. Contagious yawning is thought to be based on the capacity for empathy. Contagious yawning in chimpanzees provides further evidence that these apes may possess advanced self-awareness and empathic abilities. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2009
Therapeutic Actions Yawning

NCBI pubmed

The Migraine Premonitory Phase.

Related Articles The Migraine Premonitory Phase. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2018 Aug;24(4, Headache):996-1008 Authors: Karsan N, Bose P, Goadsby PJ Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The premonitory phase of migraine is defined as the presence of nonpainful symptomatology occurring hours to days before the onset of headache. Symptoms can include neck stiffness, yawning, thirst, and increased frequency of micturition. Clinical recognition of these symptoms is important to ensure early and effective attack management. Further understanding of the clinical phenotype and neurobiological mediation of these symptoms is important in the advancement of therapeutics research in both acute and preventive treatments of migraine. RECENT FINDINGS: Since 2014, functional imaging studies have been conducted during the premonitory stage of migraine and have provided novel insights into the early neurobiology and anatomy of the earliest stage of the migraine attack. These studies have shown early involvement of subcortical brain areas including the hypothalamus, substantia nigra, dorsal pons, and various limbic cortical areas, including the anterior cingulate cortex during the premonitory phase. More recent work has revealed altered hypothalamic-brainstem functional connectivity during migraine, which starts before the onset of pain. These exciting findings have provided functional correlation of the symptoms experienced by patients and changes seen on functional brain imaging. SUMMARY: This article focuses on the prevalence, phenotype, and proposed neurobiology of premonitory symptomatology in migraineurs as well as the scope of future research. PMID: 30074545 [PubMed - in process]