Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Virtual Reality Mirror Visual Feedback Therapy

Nonimmersive virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy and its application for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome: an open-label pilot study. 📎

Abstract Title: Nonimmersive virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy and its application for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome: an open-label pilot study. Abstract Source: Pain Med. 2010 Apr;11(4):622-9. Epub 2010 Mar 1. PMID: 20202141 Abstract Author(s): Kenji Sato, Satoshi Fukumori, Takashi Matsusaki, Tomoko Maruo, Shinichi Ishikawa, Hiroyuki Nishie, Ken Takata, Hiroaki Mizuhara, Satoshi Mizobuchi, Hideki Nakatsuka, Masaki Matsumi, Akio Gofuku, Masataka Yokoyama, Kiyoshi Morita Article Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Resuscitology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine and Dentistry, Okayama City, Okayama Prefecture, 700-8551, Japan. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Chronic pain conditions such as phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome are difficult to treat, and traditional pharmacological treatment and invasive neural block are not always effective. Plasticity in the central nervous system occurs in these conditions and may be associated with pain. Mirror visual feedback therapy aims to restore normal cortical organization and is applied in the treatment of chronic pain conditions. However, not all patients benefit from this treatment. Virtual reality technology is increasingly attracting attention for medical application, including as an analgesic modality. An advanced mirror visual feedback system with virtual reality technology may have increased analgesic efficacy and benefit a wider patient population. In this preliminary work, we developed a virtual reality mirror visual feedback system and applied it to the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome. DESIGN: A small open-label case series. Five patients with complex regional pain syndrome received virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy once a week for five to eight sessions on an outpatient basis. Patients were monitored for continued medication use and pain intensity. RESULTS: Four of the five patients showed>50% reduction in pain intensity. Two of these patients ended their visits to our pain clinic after five sessions. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy is a promising alternative treatment for complex regional pain syndrome. Further studies are necessary before concluding that analgesia provided from virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy is the result of reversing maladaptive changes in pain perception. Article Published Date : Apr 01, 2010

Training with virtual visual feedback to alleviate phantom limb pain.

Abstract Title: Training with virtual visual feedback to alleviate phantom limb pain. Abstract Source: Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2009 Jul-Aug;23(6):587-94. Epub 2009 Jan 26. PMID: 19171946 Abstract Author(s): Catherine Mercier, Angela Sirigu Article Affiliation: Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Bron, France. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Performing phantom movements with visual virtual feedback, or mirror therapy, is a promising treatment avenue to alleviate phantom limb pain. However the effectiveness of this approach appears to vary from one patient to another. OBJECTIVE: To assess the individual response to training with visual virtual feedback and to explore factors influencing the response to that approach. METHODS: Eight male participants with phantom limb pain (PLP) resulting from either a traumatic upper limb amputation or a brachial plexus avulsion participated in this single case multiple baseline study. Training was performed 2 times per week for 8 weeks where a virtual image of a missing limb performing different movements was presented and the participant was asked to follow the movements with his phantom limb. RESULTS: Patients reported an average 38% decrease in background pain on a visual analog scale (VAS), with 5 patients out of 8 reporting a reduction greater than 30%. This decrease in pain was maintained at 4 weeks postintervention in 4 of the 5 participants. No significant relationship was found between the long-term pain relief and the duration of the deafferentation or with the immediate pain relief during exposure to the feedback. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the use of training with virtual feedback to alleviate phantom limb pain. Our observations suggest that between-participant differences in the effectiveness of the treatment might be related more to a difference in the susceptibility to the virtual visual feedback, than to factors related to the lesion, such as the duration of the deafferentation. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2009
Therapeutic Actions Virtual Reality Mirror Visual Feedback Therapy

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[Psychotherapies for the Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain].

Related Articles [Psychotherapies for the Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain]. Rev Colomb Psiquiatr. 2017 Jul - Sep;46(3):178-186 Authors: Cárdenas K, Aranda M Abstract INTRODUCTION: The phantom limb pain has been described as a condition in which patients experience a feeling of itching, spasm or pain in a limb or body part that has been previously amputated. Such pain can be induced by a conflict between the representation of the visual and proprioceptive feedback of the previously healthy limb. The phantom limb pain occurs in at least 42 to 90% of amputees. Regular drug treatment of phantom limb pain is almost never effective. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was conducted in Medline and Cochrane using the MESH terms "phantom limb pain" and "psychotherapy", published in the last 10 years, in English and Spanish, finding 49 items. After reviewing the abstracts, 25 articles were excluded for not being related to the objective of the research. Additionally cross references of included articles and literature were reviewed. OBJECTIVES: To describe the psychotherapies used in the management of phantom limb pain, their effectiveness and clinical application reported in the literature. AIMS: The mechanisms underlying phantom limb pain were initially explained, as were the published studies on the usefulness of some psychotherapies such as mirror visual feedback and immersive virtual reality, visual imagery, desensitization and reprocessing eye movements and hypnosis. CONCLUSIONS: The phantom limb pain is a complex syndrome that requires pharmacological and psychotherapeutic intervention. The psychotherapies that have been used the most as adjuvants in the treatment of phantom limb pain are mirror visual feedback, desensitization and reprocessing eye movements, imagery and hypnosis. Studies with more representative samples, specifically randomized trials are required. PMID: 28728802 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]