Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Chiropractic Treatment Cervical Manipulation

Subclinical neck pain and the effects of cervical manipulation on elbow joint position sense.

Abstract Title: Subclinical neck pain and the effects of cervical manipulation on elbow joint position sense. Abstract Source: J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2011 Feb ;34(2):88-97. PMID: 21334540 Abstract Author(s): Heidi Haavik, Bernadette Murphy Article Affiliation: New Zealand College of Chiropractic, Auckland, New Zealand. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to investigate whether elbow joint position sense (JPS) accuracy differs between participants with a history of subclinical neck pain (SCNP) and those with no neck complaints and to determine whether adjusting dysfunctional cervical segments in the SCNP group improves their JPS accuracy. METHOD: Twenty-five SCNP participants and 18 control participants took part in this pre-post experimental study. Elbow JPS was measured using an electrogoniometer (MLTS700, ADInstruments, New Zealand). Participants reproduced a previously presented angle of the elbow joint with their neck in 4 positions: neutral, flexion, rotation, and combined flexion/rotation. The experimental intervention was high-velocity, low-amplitude cervical adjustments, and the control intervention was a 5-minute rest period. Group JPS data were compared, and it was assessed pre and post interventions using 3 parameters: absolute, constant, and variable errors. RESULTS: At baseline, the control group was significantly better at reproducing the elbow target angle. The SCNP group's absolute error significantly improved after the cervical adjustments when the participants' heads were in the neutral and left-rotation positions. They displayed a significant overall decrease in variable error after the cervical adjustments. The control group participants' JPS accuracy was worse after the control intervention, with a significant overall effect in absolute and variable errors. No other significant effects were detected. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that asymptomatic people with a history of SCNP have reduced elbow JPS accuracy compared to those with no history of any neck complaints. Furthermore, the results suggest that adjusting dysfunctional cervical segments in people with SCNP can improve their upper limb JPS accuracy. Article Published Date : Feb 01, 2011
Therapeutic Actions Chiropractic Treatment Cervical Manipulation

NCBI pubmed

Metastatic Cancer of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Presenting as Mid- and Low Back Pain in a Long Distance Runner.

Related Articles Metastatic Cancer of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Presenting as Mid- and Low Back Pain in a Long Distance Runner. J Chiropr Med. 2018 Jun;17(2):121-127 Authors: Leri JP Abstract Objective: The purpose of this case study is to describe the presentation of a patient with persistent back pain and a history of carcinoma. Clinical Features: A 50-year-old female runner presented to a chiropractic office with persistent moderate low back and mid-back pain. She had a history of breast carcinoma. She had no positive neurologic signs or symptoms suggestive of radiculopathy. She denied any other health symptoms and received mild relief with only 1 office visit consisting of spinal manipulation, moist heat, and electrical stimulation. Although the patient experienced some pain relief after her chiropractic treatment, she continued to experience persistent mild pain in the thoracolumbar area. Intervention and Outcome: Because of the patient's lingering back pain, she was referred for lumbar spine radiographs. On evaluation of the radiographs, a missing right L3 pedicle was seen. A subsequent computed tomography scan of the lumbar spine revealed marked metastatic changes to the lower thoracic and upper lumbar spine. The patient was immediately referred to her oncologist. The metastatic changes had progressed to her liver, and she succumbed to the disease 6 months later. Conclusion: This case highlights the importance of patient health history and further investigation of the red flag of persistent pain in patients with a history of carcinoma. PMID: 30166969 [PubMed]