Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Breast Ultrasound

How reliable is modern breast imaging in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions in the symptomatic population?

Abstract Title: How reliable is modern breast imaging in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions in the symptomatic population? Abstract Source: Clin Radiol. 1999 Oct;54(10):676-82. PMID: 10541394 Abstract Author(s): H A Moss, P D Britton, C D Flower, A H Freeman, D J Lomas, R M Warren Article Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke's Hospital Cambridge and University of Cambridge, UK. Abstract: AIM: To assess the ability of mammography and ultrasound individually and in combination to predict whether a breast abnormality is benign or malignant in patients with symptomatic breast disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients included were those in whom histological confirmation of the abnormality following surgical excision was available. Mammographic and ultrasound appearances were prospectively classified using a four-point scale (1 = no significant lesion, 2 = benign lesion, 3 = possibly malignant, 4 = probably malignant). RESULTS: Histological confirmation following surgical excision was available in 559 patients, of which 303 were benign and 256 were malignant. The imaging classification was correlated with histology in these 559 lesions. In predicting final histology, the sensitivity and specificity of mammography alone were 78.9 and 82.7%, respectively, of ultrasound alone were 88.9 and 77.9%, respectively, and of mammography and ultrasound in combination were 94.2 and 67.9%, respectively. Only one patient had both a mammogram and ultrasound reported as normal (category 1 for both tests) in whom subsequent histology revealed a carcinoma (0.4% of all carcinomas). CONCLUSION: We found that the extensive use of ultrasound increases the cancer detection rate in this selected population by 14%. Article Published Date : Oct 01, 1999

The accuracy of breast ultrasound in the evaluation of clinically benign discrete, symptomatic breast lumps.

Abstract Title: The accuracy of breast ultrasound in the evaluation of clinically benign discrete, symptomatic breast lumps. Abstract Source: Clin Radiol. 1998 Jul;53(7):490-2. PMID: 9714387 Abstract Author(s): D Lister, A J Evans, H C Burrell, R W Blamey, A R Wilson, S E Pinder, I O Ellis, C W Elston, J Kollias Article Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham, UK. Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Recent reports have suggested that breast ultrasound (US) is of value in distinguishing malignant from benign processes. The aim of this study was to establish the accuracy of US in detecting invasive malignancy in clinically benign, discrete, symptomatic breast lumps. METHODS: The US appearances of 205 clinically benign breast masses were documented prospectively and prior to mammography by one radiologist (AJE). The US appearances were then correlated with the fine needle aspiration (FNA), core biopsy and surgical findings and compared with the mammographic findings. RESULTS: The US findings were normal 72 (35%), simple cyst 63 (31%), solid benign 51 (25%), solid indeterminate 15 (7%) and solid malignant four (2%). Ultrasound characterized 13 (93%) of the 14 patients found to have invasive carcinoma as indeterminate or malignant. No patients with normal or simple cyst US findings had invasive malignancy. Ultrasound had significantly better accuracy (97% vs 87%, P<0.02) sensitivity (93% vs 57%, P<0.05) and negative predictive value (99% vs 92%, P<0.002) than mammography in the detection of invasive carcinoma when indeterminate and malignant imaging findings were taken as positive. CONCLUSION: US is a useful adjunct to FNA/core biopsy in confirming the nature of symptomatic, clinically benign breast masses and is superior to mammography in this clinical setting. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 1998
Therapeutic Actions Breast Ultrasound

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