CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Light Therapy

An open-label pilot study of a home wearable light therapy device for postpartum depression.

Abstract Title: An open-label pilot study of a home wearable light therapy device for postpartum depression. Abstract Source: Arch Womens Ment Health. 2018 Mar 30. Epub 2018 Mar 30. PMID: 29603017 Abstract Author(s): Leslie M Swanson, Helen J Burgess, Jennifer Zollars, J Todd Arnedt Article Affiliation: Leslie M Swanson Abstract: We sought to establish the feasibility and preliminary effects of home-wearable light therapy for postpartum depression, and its effects on circadian measures. Eight women within 6 months postpartum were prescribed 60 min of daily morning light therapy for 5 weeks. The device was well tolerated. Significant improvements were observed in self-report and clinician-rated depression symptoms, with little change in objective circadian measures. Home-wearable light therapy is feasible for postpartum women and may be a promising treatment for postpartum depression. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02769858. Article Published Date : Mar 29, 2018

Optimal Laser Phototherapy Parameters for Pain Relief.

Abstract Title: Optimal Laser Phototherapy Parameters for Pain Relief. Abstract Source: Photomed Laser Surg. 2018 Mar 27. Epub 2018 Mar 27. PMID: 29583080 Abstract Author(s): Rohit J Kate, Sarah Rubatt, Chukuka S Enwemeka, Wendy E Huddleston Article Affiliation: Rohit J Kate Abstract: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Studies on laser phototherapy for pain relief have used parameters that vary widely and have reported varying outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal parameter ranges of laser phototherapy for pain relief by analyzing data aggregated from existing primary literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Original studies were gathered from available sources and were screened to meet the pre-established inclusion criteria. The included articles were then subjected to meta-analysis using Cohen's d statistic for determining treatment effect size. From these studies, ranges of the reported parameters that always resulted into large effect sizes were determined. These optimal ranges were evaluated for their accuracy using leave-one-article-out cross-validation procedure. RESULTS: A total of 96 articles met the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis and yielded 232 effect sizes. The average effect size was highly significant: d = +1.36 (confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.04-1.68). Among all the parameters, total energy was found to have the greatest effect on pain relief and had the most prominent optimal ranges of 120-162 and 15.36-20.16 J, which always resulted in large effect sizes. The cross-validation accuracy of the optimal ranges for total energy was 68.57% (95% CI = 53.19-83.97). Fewer and less-prominent optimal ranges were obtained for the energy density and duration parameters. None of the remaining parameters was found to be independently related to pain relief outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of meta-analysis indicate that laser phototherapy is highly effective for pain relief. Based on the analysis of parameters, total energy can be optimized to yield the largest effect on pain relief. Article Published Date : Mar 26, 2018

Precision Light for the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders. 📎

Abstract Title: Precision Light for the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders. Abstract Source: Neural Plast. 2018 ;2018:5868570. Epub 2018 Jan 11. PMID: 29593784 Abstract Author(s): Sevag Kaladchibachi, Fabian Fernandez Article Affiliation: Sevag Kaladchibachi Abstract: Circadian timekeeping can be reset by brief flashes of light using stimulation protocols thousands of times shorter than those previously assumed to be necessary for traditional phototherapy. These observations point to a future where flexible architectures of nanosecond-, microsecond-, and millisecond-scale light pulses are compiled to reprogram the brain's internal clock when it has been altered by psychiatric illness or advanced age. In the current review, we present a chronology of seminal experiments that established the synchronizing influence of light on the human circadian system and the efficacy of prolonged bright-light exposure for reducing symptoms associated with seasonal affective disorder. We conclude with a discussion of the different ways that precision flashes could be parlayed during sleep to effect neuroadaptive changes in brain function. This article is a contribution to a special issue oncurated by editors Shimon Amir, Karen Gamble, Oliver Stork, and Harry Pantazopoulos. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2017

Photobiomodulation therapy promotes neurogenesis by improving post-stroke local microenvironment and stimulating neuroprogenitor cells.

Abstract Title: Photobiomodulation therapy promotes neurogenesis by improving post-stroke local microenvironment and stimulating neuroprogenitor cells. Abstract Source: Exp Neurol. 2017 Oct 19. Epub 2017 Oct 19. PMID: 29056360 Abstract Author(s): Luodan Yang, Donovan Tucker, Yan Dong, Chongyun Wu, Yujiao Lu, Yong Li, Juan Zhang, Timon Cheng-Yi Liu, Quanguang Zhang Article Affiliation: Luodan Yang Abstract: Recent work has indicated that photobiomodulation (PBM) may beneficially alter the pathological status of several neurological disorders, although the mechanism currently remains unclear. The current study was designed to investigate the beneficial effect of PBM on behavioral deficits and neurogenesis in a photothrombotic (PT) model of ischemic stroke in rats. From day 1 to day 7 after the establishment of PT model, 2-minute daily PBM (CW, 808nm, 350mW/cm(2), total 294J at scalp level) was applied on the infarct injury area (1.8mm anterior to the bregma and 2.5mm lateral from the midline). Rats received intraperitoneal injections of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) twice daily (50mg/kg) from day 2 to 8 post-stoke, and samples were collected at day 14. We demonstrated that PBM significantly attenuated behavioral deficits and infarct volume induced by PT stroke. Further investigation displayed that PBM remarkably enhanced neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, as evidenced by immunostaining of BrdU, Ki67, DCX, MAP2, spinophilin, and synaptophysin. Mechanistic studies suggested beneficial effects of PBM were accompanied by robust suppression of reactive gliosis and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. On the contrary, the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP production in peri-infarct regions were elevated following PBM treatment. Intriguingly, PBM could effectively switch an M1 microglial phenotype to an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. Our novel findings indicated that PBM is capable of promoting neurogenesis after ischemic stroke. The underlying mechanisms may rely on: 1) promotion of proliferation and differentiation of internal neuroprogenitor cells in the peri-infarct zone; 2) improvement of the neuronal microenvironment by altering inflammatory status and promoting mitochondrial function. These findings provide strong support for the promising therapeutic effect of PBM on neuronal repair following ischemic stroke. Article Published Date : Oct 18, 2017

Nonpharmacological Treatments for Post-Stroke Depression: An Integrative Review of the Literature.

Abstract Title: Nonpharmacological Treatments for Post-Stroke Depression: An Integrative Review of the Literature. Abstract Source: Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017 May 30:1-14. Epub 2017 May 30. PMID: 28556875 Abstract Author(s): Niloufar Niakosari Hadidi, Roberta L Huna Wagner, Ruth Lindquist Article Affiliation: Niloufar Niakosari Hadidi Abstract: Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and the number one cause of long-term disability. Seventy-five percent of annual stroke victims are older than 65. Post-stroke depression (PSD) is a common consequence of stroke, with the estimated prevalence ranging from 25% to 79%. Although several studies have investigated the impact of pharmacological interventions on PSD, there is a significant gap in knowledge regarding the efficacy of nonpharmacological measures for treatment of PSD. The purpose of the current integrative literature review was to synthesize the state of knowledge on selected nonpharmacological treatments for PSD and present findings regarding the efficacy of investigated treatments. Twenty-one studies published from 1992-2016 were identified and synthesized. Results indicated that studies demonstrating improvement in depressive symptoms included ecosystem-focused therapy, life review therapy, problem solving therapy, meridian acupressure, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, music therapy, exercise, light therapy, motivational interviewing, and robotic-assisted neurorehabilitation. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; x(x):xx-xx.]. Article Published Date : May 29, 2017

A Systematic Review of Bright Light Therapy for Eating Disorders.

Abstract Title: A Systematic Review of Bright Light Therapy for Eating Disorders. Abstract Source: Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2016 Oct 27 ;18(5). Epub 2016 Aug 27. PMID: 27835724 Abstract Author(s): Marshall T Beauchamp, Jennifer D Lundgren Article Affiliation: Marshall T Beauchamp Abstract: Objective: Bright light therapy is a noninvasive biological intervention for disorders with nonnormative circadian features. Eating disorders, particularly those with binge-eating and night-eating features, have documented nonnormative circadian eating and mood patterns, suggesting that bright light therapy may be an efficacious stand-alone or adjunctive intervention. The purpose of this systematic literature review, using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, was (1) to evaluate the state of the empirical treatment outcome literature on bright light therapy for eating disorders and (2) to explore the timing of eating behavior, mood, and sleep-related symptom change so as to understand potential mechanisms of bright light therapy action in the context of eating disorder treatment. Data Sources: A comprehensive literature search using PsycInfo and PubMed/MEDLINE was conducted in April 2016 with no date restrictions to identify studies published using bright light therapy as a treatment for eating disorders. Keywords included combinations of terms describing disordered eating (eating disorder, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating, binge, eating behavior, eating, and night eating) and the use of bright light therapy (bright light therapy, light therapy, phototherapy). After excluding duplicates, 34 articles were reviewed for inclusion. Study Selection and Data Extraction: 14 published studies of bright light therapy for eating disorders met inclusion criteria (included participants with an eating disorder/disordered-eating behaviors; presented as a case study, case series, open-label clinical trial, or randomized/nonrandomized controlled trial; written in English; and published and available by the time of manuscript review). Results: Results suggest that bright light therapy is potentially effective at improving both disordered-eating behavior and mood acutely, although the timing of symptom response and the duration of treatment effects remain unknown. Conclusions: Future research should systematically control for placebo response, assess symptom change frequently and across a broad range of systems, and evaluate the longer-term efficacy of bright light therapy for eating disorders. Article Published Date : Oct 26, 2016

Bright Light Therapy as Augmentation of Pharmacotherapy for Treatment of Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Abstract Title: Bright Light Therapy as Augmentation of Pharmacotherapy for Treatment of Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Abstract Source: Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2016 Oct 20 ;18(5). Epub 2016 Aug 20. PMID: 27835725 Abstract Author(s): Thomas M Penders, Cornel N Stanciu, Alexander M Schoemann, Philip T Ninan, Richard Bloch, Sy A Saeed Article Affiliation: Thomas M Penders Abstract: Background: Bright light therapy has demonstrated efficacy and is an accepted treatment for seasonal depression. It has been suggested that bright light therapy may have efficacy in nonseasonal depressions. Also, there is evidence that bright light therapy may improve responsiveness to antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Data Sources: We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, CINAHL, EMBASE, Scopus, and Academic OneFile for English-language literature published between January 1998 and April 2016, using the keywords bright light therapy AND major depression, bright light therapy AND depress*, bright light therapy AND bipolar depression, bright light therapy AND affective disorders, circadian rhythm AND major depression, circadian rhythm AND depress*, and circadian rhythm AND affective disorder. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Studies that reported randomized trials comparing antidepressant pharmacotherapy with bright light therapy≥ 5,000 lux for ≥ 30 minutes to antidepressant pharmacotherapy without bright light therapy for the treatment of nonseasonal depression were included. Studies of seasonal depression were excluded. Following review of the initial 112 returns, 2 of the authors independently judged each trial, applying the inclusionary and exclusionary criteria. Ten studies were selected as meeting these criteria. Subjects in these studies were pooled using standard techniques of meta-analysis. Results: Ten studies involving 458 patients showed improvement using bright light therapy augmentation versus antidepressant pharmacotherapy alone. The effect size was similar to that of other accepted augmentation strategies, roughly 0.5. Conclusions: Analysis of pooled data from randomized trials provides evidence for the efficacy of use of bright light therapy≥ 5,000 lux for periods ≥ 30 minutes when used as augmentation to standard antidepressant pharmacotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder and bipolar depression without a seasonal pattern. Article Published Date : Oct 19, 2016

Effects of melatonin and bright light treatment in childhood chronic sleep onset insomnia with late melatonin onset: A randomised controlled study.

Abstract Title: Effects of melatonin and bright light treatment in childhood chronic sleep onset insomnia with late melatonin onset: A randomised controlled study. Abstract Source: Sleep. 2016 Oct 10. Epub 2016 Aug 10. PMID: 27748241 Abstract Author(s): Annette van Maanen, Anne Marie Meijer, Marcel G Smits, Kristiaan B van der Heijden, Frans J Oort Article Affiliation: Annette van Maanen Abstract: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Chronic sleep onset insomnia with late melatonin onset is prevalent in childhood, and has negative daytime consequences. Melatonin treatment is known to be effective in treating these sleep problems. Bright light therapy might be an alternative treatment, with potential advantages over melatonin treatment. In this study, we compare the effects of melatonin and bright light treatment with a placebo condition in children with chronic sleep onset insomnia and late melatonin onset. METHODS: 84 children (mean age 10.0 years, 61% boys) first entered a baseline week, after which they received melatonin (N=26), light (N=30), or placebo pills (N=28) for three to four weeks. Sleep was measured daily with sleep diaries and actigraphy. Before and after treatment children completed a questionnaire on chronic sleep reduction, and Dim Light Melatonin Onset (DLMO) was measured. Results were analysed with linear mixed model analyses. RESULTS: Melatonin treatment and light therapy decreased sleep latency (sleep diary) and advanced sleep onset (sleep diary and actigraphy), although for sleep onset the effects of melatonin were stronger. In addition, melatonin treatment advanced DLMO and had positive effects on sleep latency and sleep efficiency (actigraphy data), and sleep time (sleep diary and actigraphy data). However, wake after sleep onset (actigraphy) increased with melatonin treatment. No effects on chronic sleep reduction were found. CONCLUSIONS: We found positive effects of both melatonin and light treatment on various sleep outcomes, but more and stronger effects were found for melatonin treatment. NEDERLANDS TRIAL REGISTER (NTR): NTR4045 (http://www.trialregister.nl). Article Published Date : Oct 09, 2016

A sham-controlled randomized trial of adjunctive light therapy for non-seasonal depression.

Abstract Title: A sham-controlled randomized trial of adjunctive light therapy for non-seasonal depression. Abstract Source: J Affect Disord. 2016 Oct ;203:1-8. Epub 2016 Aug 26. PMID: 27267951 Abstract Author(s): Magdalena Chojnacka, Anna Z Antosik-Wójcińska, Monika Dominiak, Dorota Bzinkowska, Agnieszka Borzym, Marlena Sokół-Szawłowska, Gabriela Bodzak-Opolska, Dorota Antoniak, Łukasz Święcicki Article Affiliation: Magdalena Chojnacka Abstract: BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to examine the efficacy and safety of morning bright light therapy (BLT) in the treatment of patients with a current major depressive episode (MDE) in bipolar and unipolar disorder without a seasonal pattern. It was a randomized, sham-controlled trial. METHODS: Adults, ages 18-70 years were randomized to treatment either with BLT or a sham negative ion generator (as a placebo control). The subjects were required to be on a stable and therapeutic dose of psychotropic medication for at least 4 weeks prior to enrollment and their treatment had to be insufficiently effective. Their clinical state was monitored at the baseline and at the end of treatment. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-21 items (HDRS-21), Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) and Patient Global Impression (PGI) were used. The results were analyzed with an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis. RESULTS: Ninety-five patients were enrolled (50 diagnosed with bipolar disorder and 45 with unipolar depression). Fifty-two patients were randomized to treatment with BLT and forty-three were in the placebo group (ITT population). Eighty-three subjects completed the study. There were 12 dropouts (5 in the light group and 7 in the placebo group). After 14 days of treatment, a significant improvement was found in all groups (p<0.001). The subjects treated with BLT did not significantly differ in terms of improvement in HDRS-21 scores at the endpoint when compared to patients treated with placebo (p=0.2). However, further analysis demonstrated significantly higher response (50% v. 27.9%, p=0.02) and remission rates (28.8% v. 11.6%, p=0.04) among patients treated with morning BLT when compared to placebo group. It should be noted that in the population of drug-resistant patients, BLT was more efficacious than placebo. There were no statistically significant differences between unipolar and bipolar disorders (p=0.4). CONCLUSION: Although overall improvement in HDRS-21 scores were not superior in the BLT group, both response and remission rates were significantly higher among patients treated with BLT relative to those receiving the sham intervention. BLT was also more efficacious than placebo in the population of patients with drug-resistant depression. Further studies to define the subpopulation of patients with non-seasonal depression who may benefit the most from BLT are needed. Article Published Date : Sep 30, 2016

Photo Inactivation of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm by Violet-Blue light.

Abstract Title: Photo Inactivation of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm by Violet-Blue light. Abstract Source: Curr Microbiol. 2016 Sep ;73(3):426-33. Epub 2016 Aug 8. PMID: 27278805 Abstract Author(s): Grace F Gomez, Ruijie Huang, Meoghan MacPherson, Andrea G Ferreira Zandona, Richard L Gregory Article Affiliation: Grace F Gomez Abstract: Among various preventive approaches, non-invasive phototherapy/photodynamic therapy is one of the methods used to control oral biofilm. Studies indicate that light at specific wavelengths has a potent antibacterial effect. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of violet-blue light at 380-440 nm to inhibit biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans or kill S. mutans. S. mutans UA159 biofilm cells were grown for 12-16 h in 96-well flat-bottom microtiter plates using tryptic soy broth (TSB) or TSB with 1 % sucrose (TSBS). Biofilm was irradiated with violet-blue light for 5 min. After exposure, plates were re-incubated at 37 °C for either 2 or 6 h to allow the bacteria to recover. A crystal violet biofilm assay was used to determine relative densities of the biofilm cells grown in TSB, but not in TSBS, exposed to violet-blue light. The results indicated a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease compared to the non-treated groups after the 2 or 6 h recovery period. Growth rates of planktonic and biofilm cells indicated a significant reduction in the growth rate of the violet-blue light-treated groups grown in TSB and TSBS. Biofilm viability assays confirmed a statisticallysignificant difference between violet-blue light-treated and non-treated groups in TSB and TSBS. Visible violet-blue light of the electromagnetic spectrum has the ability to inhibit S. mutans growth and reduce the formation of S. mutans biofilm. This in vitro study demonstrated that violet-blue light has the capacity to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. Potential clinical applications of light therapy in the future remain bright in preventing the development and progression of dental caries. Article Published Date : Aug 31, 2016

Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo. 📎

Abstract Title: Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo. Abstract Source: Braz J Med Biol Res. 2016 Jul 25 ;49(8). PMID: 27464024 Abstract Author(s): K H Mou, D Han, W L Liu, P Li Article Affiliation: K H Mou Abstract: Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. Article Published Date : Jul 24, 2016

PURLs: Light therapy for nonseasonal major depressive disorder? 📎

Abstract Title: PURLs: Light therapy for nonseasonal major depressive disorder? Abstract Source: J Fam Pract. 2016 Jul ;65(7):486-8. PMID: 27565102 Abstract Author(s): Kehinde Eniola, Angela Bacigalupo, Anne Mounsey Article Affiliation: Kehinde Eniola Abstract: While bright light therapy already has a place in the treatment of seasonal affective disorder, a recent trial spotlights its utility beyond the winter months. Article Published Date : Jun 30, 2016

Efficacy of Bright Light Treatment, Fluoxetine, and the Combination in Patients With Nonseasonal Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Efficacy of Bright Light Treatment, Fluoxetine, and the Combination in Patients With Nonseasonal Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Abstract Source: JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Jan ;73(1):56-63. PMID: 26580307 Abstract Author(s): Raymond W Lam, Anthony J Levitt, Robert D Levitan, Erin E Michalak, Amy H Cheung, Rachel Morehouse, Rajamannar Ramasubbu, Lakshmi N Yatham, Edwin M Tam Article Affiliation: Raymond W Lam Abstract: IMPORTANCE: Bright light therapy is an evidence-based treatment for seasonal depression, but there is limited evidence for its efficacy in nonseasonal major depressive disorder (MDD). OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of light treatment, in monotherapy and in combination with fluoxetine hydrochloride, compared with a sham-placebo condition in adults with nonseasonal MDD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Randomized, double-blind, placebo- and sham-controlled, 8-week trial in adults (aged 19-60 years) with MDD of at least moderate severity in outpatient psychiatry clinics in academic medical centers. Data were collected from October 7, 2009, to March 11, 2014. Analysis was based on modified intent to treat (randomized patients with≥1 follow-up rating). INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomly assigned to (1) light monotherapy (active 10,000-lux fluorescent white light box for 30 min/d in the early morning plus placebo pill); (2) antidepressant monotherapy (inactive negative ion generator for 30 min/d plus fluoxetine hydrochloride, 20 mg/d); (3) combination light and antidepressant; or (4) placebo (inactive negative ion generator plus placebo pill). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Change score on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) from baseline to the 8-week end point. Secondary outcomes included response (≥50% reduction in MADRS score) and remission (MADRS score ≤10 at end point). RESULTS: A total of 122 patients were randomized (light monotherapy, 32; fluoxetine monotherapy, 31; combination therapy, 29; placebo, 30). The mean (SD) changes in MADRS score for the light, fluoxetine, combination, and placebo groups were 13.4 (7.5), 8.8 (9.9), 16.9 (9.2), and 6.5 (9.6), respectively. The combination (effect size [d] = 1.11; 95% CI, 0.54 to 1.64) and light monotherapy (d = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.28 to 1.31) were significantly superior to placebo in the MADRS change score, but fluoxetine monotherapy (d = 0.24; 95% CI, -0.27 to 0.74) was not superior to placebo. For the respective placebo, fluoxetine, light,and combination groups at the end point, response was achieved by 10 (33.3%), 9 (29.0%), 16 (50.0%), and 22 (75.9%) and remission was achieved by 9 (30.0%), 6 (19.4%), 14 (43.8%), and 17 (58.6%). Combination therapy was superior to placebo in MADRS response (β = 1.70; df = 1; P = .005)and remission (β = 1.33; df = 1; P = .02), with numbers needed to treat of 2.4 (95% CI, 1.6 to 5.8) and 3.5 (95% CI, 2.0 to 29.9), respectively. All treatments were generally well tolerated, with few significant differences in treatment-emergent adverse events. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Bright light treatment, both as monotherapy and in combination with fluoxetine, was efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of adults with nonseasonal MDD. The combination treatment had the most consistent effects. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00958204. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2015

Trends of inflammatory markers and cytokines after one month of phototherapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. 📎

Abstract Title: Trends of inflammatory markers and cytokines after one month of phototherapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Abstract Source: Acta Med Acad. 2015 Nov ;44(2):102-8. PMID: 26702905 Abstract Author(s): José Meneses Calderón, Irma González Sánchez, Guillermo Aburto Huacuz, Arely Sarai Alonso Barreto, María Del Carmen Colín Ferreyra, Hugo Mendieta Zerón Article Affiliation: José Meneses Calderón Abstract: OBJECTIVE: to evaluate changes in the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in patients with rheumatoid arthritis submitted to phototherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was an open label study, enrolling ten patients. The phototherapy scheme within a range of 425 to 650 nm, 11.33 Joules/cm2, 30 cm above the chest was as follows: a) 45-min daily sessions from Monday to Friday for 2 to 3 months; b) three, 45- min weekly sessions for 1 to 2 months; c) twice weekly 45-min sessions for 1 to 2 months, and d) one weekly session for 1 to 2 months until completion. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and rheumatoid factor were measured in peripheral blood and tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-10 in leukocytes by quantitative real-time Reverse transcriptase-Polymerase chain reaction. In all the patients the next indexes: Karnofsky scale, Rheumatoid Arthritis-specific quality of life instrument, Steinbrocker Functional Capacity Rating and the Visual Analog Scale were evaluated. RESULTS: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and rheumatoid factor declined notoriously after the indicated sessions. In gene expression, there was a tendency in tumor necrosis factor-α to decrease after 1 month, from 24.5±11.4 to 18±9.2 relative units, without reaching a significant statistical difference. The four tested indexes showed improvement. CONCLUSION: Phototherapy appears to be a plausible complementary option to reduce the inflammatory component in rheumatoid arthritis. Article Published Date : Oct 31, 2015

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) associated with aerobic plus resistance training to improve inflammatory biomarkers in obese adults.

Abstract Title: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) associated with aerobic plus resistance training to improve inflammatory biomarkers in obese adults. Abstract Source: Lasers Med Sci. 2015 May 10. Epub 2015 May 10. PMID: 25958170 Abstract Author(s): Raquel Munhoz da Silveira Campos, Ana Raimunda Dâmaso, Deborah Cristina Landi Masquio, Antonio Eduardo Aquino, Marcela Sene-Fiorese, Fernanda Oliveira Duarte, Lian Tock, Nivaldo Antonio Parizotto, Vanderlei Salvador Bagnato Article Affiliation: Raquel Munhoz da Silveira Campos Abstract: Recently, investigations suggest the benefits of low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in noninvasive treatment of cellulite, improvement of body countering, and control of lipid profile. However, the underlying key mechanism for such potential effects associated to aerobic plus resistance training to reduce body fat and inflammatory process, related to obesity in women still unclear. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the effects of combined therapy of LLLT and aerobic plus resistance training in inflammatory profile and body composition of obese women. For this study, it involved 40 obese women with age of 20-40 years. Inclusion criteria were primary obesity and body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m(2) and less than 40 kg/m(2). The voluntaries were allocated in two different groups: phototherapy group and SHAM group. The interventions consisted on physical exercise training and application of phototherapy (808 nm), immediately after the physical exercise, with special designed device. Proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory adipokines were measured. It was showed that LLLT associated to physical exercise is more effective than physical exercise alone to increase adiponectin concentration, an anti-inflammatory adipokine. Also, it showed reduced values of neck circumference (cm), insulin concentration (μU/ml), and interleukin-6 (pg/ml) in LLLT group. In conclusion, phototherapy can be an important tool in the obesity, mostly considering its potential effects associated to exercise training inattenuating inflammation in women, being these results applicable in the clinical practices to control related risk associated to obesity. Article Published Date : May 09, 2015
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Therapeutic application of light emitting diode: Photo-oncomic approach.

Related Articles Therapeutic application of light emitting diode: Photo-oncomic approach. J Photochem Photobiol B. 2019 Jan 09;192:1-7 Authors: Oh PS, Jeong HJ Abstract As a new light source, light emitting diode (LED) with high brightness and lower cost has been rapidly developed in medical application and light therapy. LED phototherapy can activate target cells with appropriate power and adequate energy density. This review provides general information on therapeutic applications of blue, green, yellow, red, and infrared LED in medical treatments for various physical abnormalities and on bio-imaging. The bio-imaging system is improved by decreasing the number of microscopes apparatuses including neutral-density filter, excitation filters and mechanical shutters. The numbers of excitation photons are increased and the fluorescent excitation efficiency is improved at cellular level. In the target tissue, the therapeutic effect of LEDs is dependent on incident photons irrespective of the system used to generate these photons. Photomodulated light from LED device is delivered in pulsed mode with specific pulse sequences and time. Too low or too high dose of energy may be ineffective at all. Clinical applications of LED light depending on different wavelengths are summarized. The author's photo-oncomic experiments using a specific blue light emitting diode were introduced, showing that blue LED possessed anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic abilities in cancer cells and mice. As a promising light source, photo-oncomic approach of blue LED could be applied to treat cancers and inflammatory diseases. PMID: 30654264 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Exploring resting state connectivity in patients with psychotic depression.

Related Articles Exploring resting state connectivity in patients with psychotic depression. PLoS One. 2019;14(1):e0209908 Authors: Oudega ML, van der Werf YD, Dols A, Wattjes MP, Barkhof F, Bouckaert F, Vandenbulcke M, De Winter FL, Sienaert P, Eikelenboom P, Stek ML, van den Heuvel OA, Emsell L, Rhebergen D, van Exel E Abstract BACKGROUND: Severe depression is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Neural network dysfunction may contribute to disease mechanisms underlying different clinical subtypes. Here, we apply resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging based measures of brain connectivity to investigate network dysfunction in severely depressed in-patients with and without psychotic symptoms. METHODS: A cohort study was performed at two sites. Older patients with major depressive disorder with or without psychotic symptoms were included (n = 23 at site one, n = 26 at site two). Resting state 3-Tesla functional MRI scans, with eyes closed, were obtained and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scales were completed. We denoised data and calculated resting state networks in the two groups separately. We selected five networks of interest (1. bilateral frontoparietal, 2.left lateralized frontoparietal, 3.right lateralized frontoparietal, 4.default mode network (DMN) and 5.bilateral basal ganglia and insula network) and performed regression analyses with severity of depression, as well as presence or absence of psychotic symptoms. RESULTS: The functional connectivity (FC) patterns did not correlate with severity of depression. Depressed patients with psychotic symptoms (n = 14, 61%) compared with patients without psychotic symptoms (n = 9, 39%) from site one showed significantly decreased FC in the right part of the bilateral frontoparietal network (p = 0.002). This result was not replicated when comparing patients with (n = 9, 35%) and without (n = 17, 65%) psychotic symptoms from site two. CONCLUSION: Psychotic depression may be associated with decreased FC of the frontoparietal network, which is involved in cognitive control processes, such as attention and emotion regulation. These findings suggest that FC in the frontoparietal network may be related to the subtype of depression, i.e. presence of psychotic symptoms, rather than severity of depression. Since the findings could not be replicated in the 2nd sample, replication is needed before drawing definite conclusions. PMID: 30653516 [PubMed - in process]

Pleural amyloidosis with recurrent pleural effusion and pulmonary embolism: A case report.

Related Articles Pleural amyloidosis with recurrent pleural effusion and pulmonary embolism: A case report. Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 Jan;98(3):e14151 Authors: Dai Y, Liu C, Chen J, Zeng Q, Duan C Abstract RATIONAL: Clinical and radiologic manifestations of pleural amyloidosis are non-specific. And it can easily be missed or misdiagnosed. Meanwhile, few studies document amyloidosis presenting with pulmonary infarcts at the same time. Hereby, we report a case of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL) pleural amyloidosis with pulmonary embolism rarely reported. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 66-year-old male patient who suffered recurrent pleural effusion for more than 6 months and coughed for 2 months was admitted to hospital for clear diagnosis and treatment. He was previously engaged in a job which exposed him to dust and talcum powder for a long time. He underwent right thoracentesis and anti-infective treatment before admission. The patient's cough and shortness of breath were slightly relieved. He still experienced pleural effusion and had symptoms of cough and shortness of breath. DIAGNOSIS: Chest X-ray demonstrated bilateral pleural effusion. Chest computed tomography (CT) angiography demonstrated left lower pulmonary embolism. The thorascopy showed hyperaemia and black tissue of the parietal pleura, which were biopsied. The pathological diagnosis was amyloidosis. The final diagnosis of this patient was AL pleural amyloidosis and left lower pulmonary embolism. INTERVENTION: During the hospitalization, the patient underwent thoracentesis several times without any conclusive diagnosis. After the diagnosis of pleural amyloidosis, the patient was repeatedly advised to undergo bone marrow biopsy and pleurodesis which the patient refused. For pulmonary embolism, Nadroparin calcium combined Warfarin were administered as anticoagulative therapy. OUTCOMES: The pulmonary embolism resolved 13 days after the anticoagulant therapy. The patient refused treatment for pleural effusion and requested for discharge. At the time of discharge, shortness of breath was relieved, and the pleural effusion had decreased. The patient was lost to follow-up. LESSONS: Amyloidosis is a rare disease which can be ignored by many clinicians. It needs to be diagnosed promptly since the prognosis of amyloidosis is poor. Clinicians must improve relevant understandings of this kind of disease so as not to delay the diagnosis and treatment. We must be alert to the occurrence of embolic disease among amyloidosis patients. Last but not least, we should also think of the possibility of amyloidosis in patients with pulmonary embolism and recurrent pleural effusion. PMID: 30653153 [PubMed - in process]

Superoxide Radical Photogenerator with Amplification Effect: Surmounting the Achilles' heels of Photodynamic Oncotherapy.

Related Articles Superoxide Radical Photogenerator with Amplification Effect: Surmounting the Achilles' heels of Photodynamic Oncotherapy. J Am Chem Soc. 2019 Jan 17;: Authors: Li M, Xiong T, Du J, Tian R, Xiao M, Guo L, Long S, Fan J, Sun W, Shao K, Song X, Foley JW, Peng X Abstract Strong oxygen dependence, poor tumor targeting, and limited treatment depth have been considered as the "Achilles' heels" facing the clinical usage of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Different from common approaches, here, we propose an innovative tactic by using photon-initiated dyad cationic superoxide radical (O2-•) generator (ENBOS) featuring "0 + 1 > 1" amplification effect to simultaneously overcome these drawbacks. In particular, by taking advantage of the Förster resonance energy transfer theory, the energy donor successfully endows ENBOS with significantly enhanced NIR absorbance and photon utility, which in turn lead to ENBOS more easily activated and generating more O2-• in deep tissues, thus dramatically intensifies the type I PDT against hypoxic deep tumors. Moreover, benefiting from the dyad cationic feature, ENBOS achieves superior "structure-inherent targeting" abilities with the signal-to-background ratio as high as 25.2 at 48 h post intravenous injection, offering opportunities for accurate imaging-guided tumor treatment. Meanwhile, the intratumoral accumulation and retention performance are also markedly improved (> 120 h). Based on these unique merits, ENBOS selectively inhibits the deep-seated hypoxic tumor proliferation at a low light-dose irradiation. Therefore, this delicate design may open up new horizons and cause a paradigm change for PDT in future cancer therapy. PMID: 30652866 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Combination of bortezomib in the induction, conditioning and consolidation with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis.

Related Articles Combination of bortezomib in the induction, conditioning and consolidation with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis. Am J Hematol. 2019 Jan 16;: Authors: Huang X, Fu Z, Chen L, Chen W, Ren G, Guo J, Zhao L, Zeng C, Zhang H, Gong D, Ren Q, Liu Z Abstract Bortezomib and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) are both active regimen in AL amyloidosis. In this study, we assessed safety and efficacy of combination of bortezomib in the induction, conditioning and consolidation with ASCT in patients with newly diagnosed AL amyloidosis. Treatment schedule consisted of two cycles of bortezomib and dexamethasone (BD) induction therapy, ASCT treatment (the conditioning regimen consisted of melphalan and bortezomib), and four additional 21-day cycles of bortezomib treatment after ASCT. Twenty-one patients were enrolled in the study. Nine patients had cardiac involvement. The overall response rate (ORR) was 90% (18/20) at 12 months after ASCT in evaluable patients, including 10 patients (50%) with complete response, 7 patients (35%) with very good partial response. The organ response rate was 72.2%. The renal and cardiac response was 55% and 40% at 12 months after ASCT respectively, and reached to 66.7% and 50% at 24 months. Peripheral neuropathy and infection were the common adverse events during the treatment, and five patients have been discontinued bortezomib for neuropathy. No death occurred in this study. After a median follow-up of 53 months, the overall survival was 100%, and the estimated progression free survival was 79.9% at 60 months. Data from this study demonstrate that incorporating bortezomib into induction, conditioning and consolidation with ASCT yielded a high rate of hematologic response with tolerable toxicity in patients with AL amyloidosis. The overall survival and progression-free survival also improved after long term follow-up in these patients. (ClinicalTrial.gov Identifier: NCT01273844). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30652338 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Study progression of anti-angiogenetic therapy and its combination with other agents for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

Related Articles Study progression of anti-angiogenetic therapy and its combination with other agents for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatobiliary Surg Nutr. 2018 Dec;7(6):466-474 Authors: Gong X, Qin S Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy worldwide and is especially prevalent in the Chinese population. Treatment of advanced HCC has posed a considerable challenge to clinicians and highly effective therapies remain elusive. Angiogenesis contributes greatly to the pathogenesis, invasion and metastasis of HCC. Therefore, anti-angiogenesis therapy could be instrumental to the treatment of HCC. In recent years, several anti-angiogenesis drugs have generated significant outcomes in a few key clinical studies, and in this light, anti-angiogenesis therapy has become a critical aspect of comprehensive treatment of HCC. In this article, to provide a reference for clinicians, we review these advances and discuss the future direction of development. PMID: 30652091 [PubMed]

The public health benefit and burden of mass drug administration programs in Vietnamese schoolchildren: Impact of mebendazole.

Related Articles The public health benefit and burden of mass drug administration programs in Vietnamese schoolchildren: Impact of mebendazole. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2018 11;12(11):e0006954 Authors: Debaveye S, Gonzalez Torres CV, De Smedt D, Heirman B, Kavanagh S, Dewulf J Abstract BACKGROUND: Mass anthelmintic drug administration is recommended in developing countries to address infection by soil-transmitted helminthiases (STH). We quantified the public health benefit of treatment with mebendazole in eight million Vietnamese children aged 5-14 years from 2006 to 2011. This was compared to the environmental impact of the pharmaceutical supply chain of mebendazole, as the resource use and emissions associated with pharmaceutical production can be associated with a public health burden, e.g. through emissions of fine particulate matter. METHODOLOGY: Through Markov modelling the disability due to STH was quantified for hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura. For each worm type, four levels of intensity of infection were included: none, light, medium and heavy. The treatment effect on patients was quantified in Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). The public health burden induced by the pharmaceutical supply chain of mebendazole was quantified in DALYs through Life Cycle Assessment. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Compared to 'no treatment', the modelled results of five-year treatment averted 116,587 DALYs (68% reduction) for the three worms combined and largely driven by A. lumbricoides. The main change in DALYs occurred in the first year of treatment, after which the results stabilized. The public health burden associated with the pharmaceutical supply chain was 6 DALYs. CONCLUSIONS: The public health benefit of the Mass Drug Administration (MDA) averted substantially more DALYs than those induced by the pharmaceutical supply chain. These results were verified in a sensitivity analysis. The starting prevalence for each worm was the most sensitive model parameter. This methodology is useful for policymakers interested in a holistic approach towards the public health performance of MDA programs, enveloping both the treatment benefit received by the patient and the public health burden associated with the resource consumption and environmental emissions of the pharmaceutical production and supply chain. PMID: 30419030 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The X-ray structure of human calbindin-D28K: an improved model.

Related Articles The X-ray structure of human calbindin-D28K: an improved model. Acta Crystallogr D Struct Biol. 2018 Oct 01;74(Pt 10):1008-1014 Authors: Noble JW, Almalki R, Roe SM, Wagner A, Duman R, Atack JR Abstract Calbindin-D28K is a widely expressed calcium-buffering cytoplasmic protein that is involved in many physiological processes. It has been shown to interact with other proteins, suggesting a role as a calcium sensor. Many of the targets of calbindin-D28K are of therapeutic interest: for example, inositol monophosphatase, the putative target of lithium therapy in bipolar disorder. Presented here is the first crystal structure of human calbindin-D28K. There are significant deviations in the tertiary structure when compared with the NMR structure of rat calbindin-D28K (PDB entry 2g9b), despite 98% sequence identity. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) indicates that the crystal structure better predicts the properties of calbindin-D28K in solution compared with the NMR structure. Here, the first direct visualization of the calcium-binding properties of calbindin-D28K is presented. Four of the six EF-hands that make up the secondary structure of the protein contain a calcium-binding site. Two distinct conformations of the N-terminal EF-hand calcium-binding site were identified using long-wavelength calcium single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD). This flexible region has previously been recognized as a protein-protein interaction interface. SAXS data collected in both the presence and absence of calcium indicate that there are no large structural differences in the globular structure of calbindin-D28K between the calcium-loaded and unloaded proteins. PMID: 30289411 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The case of the dog and the blue light.

Related Articles The case of the dog and the blue light. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Oct;79(4):782-784 Authors: Grabell DA, Hebert AA PMID: 30241626 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Antidepressive and anxiolytic effects of ostruthin, a TREK-1 channel activator.

Related Articles Antidepressive and anxiolytic effects of ostruthin, a TREK-1 channel activator. PLoS One. 2018;13(8):e0201092 Authors: Joseph A, Thuy TTT, Thanh LT, Okada M Abstract We screened a library of botanical compounds purified from plants of Vietnam for modulators of the activity of a two-pore domain K+ channel, TREK-1, and we identified a hydroxycoumarin-related compound, ostruthin, as an activator of this channel. Ostruthin increased whole-cell TREK-1 channel currents in 293T cells at a low concentration (EC50 = 5.3 μM), and also activity of the TREK-2 channel (EC50 = 3.7 mM). In contrast, ostruthin inhibited other K+ channels, e.g. human ether-à-go-go-related gene (HERG1), inward-rectifier (Kir2.1), voltage-gated (Kv1.4), and two-pore domain (TASK-1) at higher concentrations, without affecting voltage-gated potassium channel (KCNQ1 and 3). We tested the effect of this compound on mouse anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and found anxiolytic activity in the open-field, elevated plus maze, and light/dark box tests. Of note, ostruthin also showed antidepressive effects in the forced swim and tail suspension tests, although previous studies reported that inhibition of TREK-1 channels resulted in an antidepressive effect. The anxiolytic and antidepressive effect was diminished by co-administration of a TREK-1 blocker, amlodipine, indicating the involvement of TREK-1 channels. Administration of ostruthin suppressed the stress-induced increase in anti-c-Fos immunoreactivity in the lateral septum, without affecting immunoreactivity in other mood disorder-related nuclei, e.g. the amygdala, paraventricular nuclei, and dorsal raphe nucleus. Ostruthin may exert its anxiolytic and antidepressive effects through a different mechanism from current drugs. PMID: 30110354 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Overuse of inhaled corticosteroids in COPD: five questions for withdrawal in daily practice.

Related Articles Overuse of inhaled corticosteroids in COPD: five questions for withdrawal in daily practice. Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2018;13:2089-2099 Authors: Cataldo D, Derom E, Liistro G, Marchand E, Ninane V, Peché R, Slabbynck H, Vincken W, Janssens W Abstract Evidence and guidelines are becoming increasingly clear about imbalance between the risks and benefits of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) in patients with COPD. While selected patients may benefit from ICS-containing regimens, ICSs are often inappropriately prescribed with - according to Belgian market research data - up to 70% of patients in current practice receiving ICSs, usually as a fixed combination with a long-acting β2-adrenoreceptor agonist. Studies and recommendations support withdrawal of ICSs in a large group of patients with COPD. However, historical habits appear difficult to change even in the light of recent scientific evidence. We have built a collaborative educational platform with chest physicians and primary care physicians to increase awareness and provide guidance and support in this matter. PMID: 30013336 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Does Maintaining Apical Patency during Instrumentation Increase Postoperative Pain or Flare-up Rate after Nonsurgical Root Canal Treatment? A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Related Articles Does Maintaining Apical Patency during Instrumentation Increase Postoperative Pain or Flare-up Rate after Nonsurgical Root Canal Treatment? A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials. J Endod. 2018 Aug;44(8):1228-1236 Authors: Yaylali IE, Demirci GK, Kurnaz S, Celik G, Kaya BU, Tunca YM Abstract INTRODUCTION: The concept of maintaining apical patency (AP) is a controversial issue in endodontics. The primary objectives of this systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were to determine the influence of maintaining AP during instrumentation on postoperative pain severity and the prevalence of flare-ups. A second objective was to assess the effect of maintaining AP on the use of analgesics. METHODS: RCTs and controlled clinical trials were searched for in MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), and the Cochrane Library. Four reviewers independently screened all identified articles for eligibility. The included studies were assessed for bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach was used to rate the quality of the body of evidence. Because of the considerable heterogeneity of the studies, a meta-analysis was not possible. Therefore, the results were analyzed narratively. RESULTS: Five RCTs that included a total of 848 patients were found eligible and included in the review. An assessment of the risk of bias in the included studies provided results that classified the studies as showing a low risk (n = 1), high risk (n = 1), or unclear risk (n = 3) of bias. The available evidence indicated that maintaining AP (1) did not increase postoperative pain in teeth with nonvital pulp, (2) did not increase postoperative pain in teeth with vital pulp, and (3) did not cause (0%) flare-ups. The available evidence also indicated that maintaining AP did not increase analgesic use. The available evidence indicated that maintaining AP did not increase postoperative pain when a single-visit or 2-visit root canal treatment approach was used. CONCLUSIONS: In light of the current evidence, maintaining AP does not increase postoperative pain in teeth with vital/nonvital pulp when compared with nonapical patency (low to moderate quality evidence). Furthermore, maintaining AP did not cause flare-ups (low evidence) and did not increase analgesic use (moderate evidence). PMID: 29935875 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Motorized 0.8-mm micropunch grafting for refractory vitiligo: A retrospective study of 230 cases.

Related Articles Motorized 0.8-mm micropunch grafting for refractory vitiligo: A retrospective study of 230 cases. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Oct;79(4):720-727.e1 Authors: Bae JM, Lee JH, Kwon HS, Kim J, Kim DS Abstract BACKGROUND: Punch grafting for vitiligo is time-consuming and can result in cobblestone-like appearances. We devised a motorized 0.8-mm micropunch grafting procedure to overcome these limitations. OBJECTIVE: To assess the therapeutic effectiveness and adverse events associated with micropunch grafting in refractory vitiligo. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 230 cases in 208 patients with stable vitiligo who underwent motorized 0.8-mm micropunch grafting during January 2015-August 2017. Treatment success was defined as ≥75% repigmentation, and factors associated with the outcome were assessed. RESULTS: Overall, 181 of 230 lesions (78.7%) achieved treatment success after a median of 6 months with postoperative excimer therapy. Lesions on the face and neck, and disease stability of ≥12 months were good prognostic factors for treatment success. Common adverse events were color mismatch (24.8%) and cobblestone appearance (18.3%). Overall, the treatment was tolerable. LIMITATIONS: This was a retrospective study. CONCLUSION: Micropunch grafting using a motorized 0.8-mm punch can successfully treat refractory vitiligo with short procedure times and excellent outcomes. This technique could be a rapid and convenient surgical option with acceptable adverse events and is promising for treating refractory vitiligo on an outpatient basis, particularly in patients who are unlikely to tolerate prolonged surgery. PMID: 29913258 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Custom paper shield to prevent perilesional hyperpigmentation after excimer laser treatment for vitiligo.

Related Articles Custom paper shield to prevent perilesional hyperpigmentation after excimer laser treatment for vitiligo. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Oct;79(4):e65-e66 Authors: AlJasser MI, Altalhab S, Al-Issa A PMID: 29803906 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Management of radiation-induced mucosal necrosis with photobiomodulation therapy.

Related Articles Management of radiation-induced mucosal necrosis with photobiomodulation therapy. Support Care Cancer. 2018 08;26(8):2493 Authors: Epstein JB, Song P, Ho A, Larian B, Asher A, Bensadoun RJ PMID: 29728844 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Ibrutinib improves the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death.

Related Articles Ibrutinib improves the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death. Pharmazie. 2018 05 01;73(5):294-299 Authors: Li Z, Wu J, Sheng L Abstract The current study mainly aims to evaluate the effects of ibrutinib on endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)-induced apoptosis in Reh cells, which may shed light on the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) among children. In line with previous studies, our data show that ibrutinib significantly suppressed Reh cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We further evaluated the role of ibrutinib on Reh cell colony formation and apoptosis. Ibrutinib inhibited clonogenic capacity and induced Reh cell apoptosis, suggesting an anti-tumor effects of ibrutinib in the progression of ALL. Further study showed that ibrutinib treatment increased ERS-related protein expression, including Bip, ATF4 and CHOP, suggesting the induction of ER-stress in Reh cells. More importantly, once ER-stress was suppressed by tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), an ER-stress inhibitor, the upregulation of Bip, ATF4, CHOP, cleaved-caspase3 and cleaved-PARP after ibrutinib treatment was partially reversed, suggesting that induction of ALL cell apoptosis by ibrutinib was partially attributed to activation of ER stress. In summary, we showed novel data that ER-stress induced cell apoptosis plays a key role in the therapeutic effects of ibrutinib on ALL cell malignancies. PMID: 29724297 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Hyperglycemia elicits anxiety-like behaviors in zebrafish: Protective role of dietary diphenyl diselenide.

Related Articles Hyperglycemia elicits anxiety-like behaviors in zebrafish: Protective role of dietary diphenyl diselenide. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2018 07 13;85:128-135 Authors: Dos Santos MM, de Macedo GT, Prestes AS, Loro VL, Heidrich GM, Picoloto RS, Rosemberg DB, Barbosa NV Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disease that may comorbid with various psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and depression. The search for effective therapeutics to alleviate hyperglycemia and complications resulting from DM is continuous. Here we investigate the effects of diphenyl diselenide (DD), an organoselenium compound with several pharmacological properties, in a zebrafish model of hyperglycemia. Fish were fed for 74 days with a diet containing 3 mg/Kg DD, a concentration chosen after experiments based in a dose-response curve (DD 1, 2 and 3 mg/Kg) that did not cause overt toxicity (mortality, weight loss and neurobehavioral deficits). In the last 14 days of the experimental period, fish were concomitantly exposed to a glucose solution (111 mM). Afterwards, blood glucose levels, brain selenium (Se) content, and behavioral analysis aiming to assess anxiety-like behaviors and locomotor/exploratory activities were performed. In the novel tank diving test, glucose decreased vertical exploration and fish spent less time in the lit area when tested in the light-dark test, suggesting increased anxiety-like behavior. Moreover, DD decreased blood glucose levels in hyperglycemic fish as well as prevented the development of anxiety-related symptoms. DD diet alone did not change glycemia and behavioral parameters, but increased Se levels in the brain without affecting the cellular viability. Collectively, our findings highlight the growing utility of this zebrafish hyperglycemia model as a valuable strategy for further research in DM field and neuroprotective approaches. PMID: 29723547 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Connecting Alzheimer's disease to diabetes: Underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets.

Related Articles Connecting Alzheimer's disease to diabetes: Underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. Neuropharmacology. 2018 07 01;136(Pt B):160-171 Authors: Vieira MNN, Lima-Filho RAS, De Felice FG Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and vice versa, and a growing body of evidence indicates that these diseases are connected both at epidemiological, clinical and molecular levels. Recent studies have begun to reveal common pathogenic mechanisms shared by AD and type 2 diabetes. Impaired neuronal insulin signaling and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are present in animal models of AD, similar to observations in peripheral tissue in T2D. These findings shed light into novel diabetes-related mechanisms leading to brain dysfunction in AD. Here, we review the literature on selected mechanisms shared between these diseases and discuss how the identification of such mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic targets in AD. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Metabolic Impairment as Risk Factors for Neurodegenerative Disorders.' PMID: 29129775 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Management of radiation-induced mucosal necrosis with photobiomodulation therapy.

Related Articles Management of radiation-induced mucosal necrosis with photobiomodulation therapy. Support Care Cancer. 2018 08;26(8):2491-2492 Authors: de Bataille C, Sibaud V, Prioul A, Laprie A, Vigarios E PMID: 28993904 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Photoconversion-Tunable Fluorophore Vesicles for Wavelength-Dependent Photoinduced Cancer Therapy.

Related Articles Photoconversion-Tunable Fluorophore Vesicles for Wavelength-Dependent Photoinduced Cancer Therapy. Adv Mater. 2017 May;29(19): Authors: He H, Ji S, He Y, Zhu A, Zou Y, Deng Y, Ke H, Yang H, Zhao Y, Guo Z, Chen H Abstract Photoconversion tunability of fluorophore dye is of great interest in cancer nanomedicine such as fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy (PDT), and photothermal therapy (PTT). Herein, this paper reports wavelength-dependent photoconversional polymeric vesicles of boron dipyrromethene (Bodipy) fluorophore for either PDT under 660 nm irradiation or PTT under 785 nm irradiation. After being assembled within polymeric vesicles at a high drug loading, Bodipy molecules aggregate in the conformations of both J-type and H-type, thereby causing red-shifted absorption into near-infrared region, ultralow radiative transition, and ideal resistance to photobleaching. Such vesicles further possess enhanced blood circulation, preferable tumor accumulation, as well as superior cell uptake as compared to free Bodipy. In particular, the vesicles mainly generate abundant intracellular singlet oxygen for PDT treatment under 660 nm irradiation, while they primarily produce a potent hyperthermia for PTT with tumor ablation through singlet oxygen-synergized photothermal necrosis under 785 nm irradiation. This approach provides a facile and general strategy to tune photoconversion characteristics of fluorophore dyes for wavelength-dependent photoinduced cancer therapy. PMID: 28295684 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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