Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Exercise Swimming

Nigella sativa seed extract attenuates the fatigue induced by exhaustive swimming in rats. 📎

Abstract Title: Nigella sativa seed extract attenuates the fatigue induced by exhaustive swimming in rats. Abstract Source: Biomed Rep. 2017 Apr ;6(4):468-474. Epub 2017 Feb 24. PMID: 28413647 Abstract Author(s): Mahbubur Rahman, Dong Kwon Yang, Gi-Beum Kim, Sei-Jin Lee, Shang-Jin Kim Article Affiliation: Mahbubur Rahman Abstract: In previous studies, Nigella sativa (NS) has been studied due to its various physiological and pharmacological activities. However, evidence on the effects of NS on physical fatigue following exhaustive swimming remains limited. In the present study, the authors evaluated the potential beneficial effects of NS against the fatigue activity following exhaustive swimming. Rats were orally administered with NS extract (2 g/kg/day) for 21 days, and the anti-fatigue effect was assessed by exhaustive swimming exercise. The presented results indicated that pre-treatment of NS extract significantly increased the time to exhaustion. In hemodynamic parameters, NS extract increased blood pO2 and O2sat, but decreased pCO2. For underlying mechanisms, NS extract protected depletion of energy, indicated by increased levels of blood pH, glucose and tissue glycogen contents, and decreased levels of blood lactate, tissue lactic dehydrogenase and creatine kinase, when the NS extract was pre-treated. In addition, the NS extract inhibited oxidative stress following exhaustive swimming, as reflected by the results of increased levels of superoxide dismutase and redox ratio, and decreased the level of malondialdehyde when the NS extract was pre-treated. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that NS extract has an anti-fatigue activity against exhaustive swimming by energy restoration and oxidative-stress defense. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2017

Effect of exercise on serum vitamin D and tissue vitamin D receptors in experimentally induced type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of exercise on serum vitamin D and tissue vitamin D receptors in experimentally induced type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Abstract Source: J Adv Res. 2016 Sep ;7(5):671-9. Epub 2016 Jul 15. PMID: 27504197 Abstract Author(s): Yosria E Aly, Azza S Abdou, Mona M Rashad, Menatallah M Nassef Article Affiliation: Yosria E Aly Abstract: This work aimed to study the effect of swimming exercise on serum vitamin D level and tissue vitamin D receptors in experimentally induced type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Sixty adult male rats were divided into control and diabetic groups. Each was further subdivided into sedentary and exercised subgroups. Diabetes Mellitus was induced by a single intraperitoneal dose of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg) dissolved in cold 0.01 M citrate buffer (pH 4.5). The exercised subgroups underwent swimming for 60 min, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Serum glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), lipids, vitamin D and tissue Vitamin D receptors (VDR) were evaluated. Significant increase in serum glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, cholesterol, triglycerides, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels in sedentary diabetic rats was detected. On the other hand, high density lipoprotein (HDL), free fatty acids, serum vitamin D and pancreatic, adipose, and muscular VDR showed a significant decrease in the same group. It is evident that all these parameters were reversed by swimming exercise indicating its beneficial role in type 2 Diabetes. In diabetic groups; serum vitamin D was found to be correlated negatively with serum glucose, insulin, HOMA, cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL and positively correlated with HDL and tissue VDR. In conclusion, Disturbed vitamin D is associated with metabolic impairments in sedentary diabetic rats. Moderate swimming exercise is beneficial in improving these consequences through modulation of vitamin D status. Future studies could be designed to investigate the effect of the combination of vitamin D intake with exercise in diabetic patients. Article Published Date : Aug 31, 2016

In vivo and in vitro evaluation of the effects of Urtica dioica and swimming activity on diabetic factors and pancreatic beta cells. 📎

Abstract Title: In vivo and in vitro evaluation of the effects of Urtica dioica and swimming activity on diabetic factors and pancreatic beta cells. Abstract Source: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2016 ;16(1):101. Epub 2016 Mar 15. PMID: 26980377 Abstract Author(s): Abbas Ranjbari, Mohammad Ali Azarbayjani, Ashril Yusof, Abdul Halim Mokhtar, Samad Akbarzadeh, Mohamed Yousif Ibrahim, Bahman Tarverdizadeh, Parviz Farzadinia, Reza Hajiaghaee, Firouzeh Dehghan Article Affiliation: Abbas Ranjbari Abstract: BACKGROUND: Urtica dioica (UD) has been identified as a traditional herbal medicine. This study aimed to investigate the effect of UD extract and swimming activity on diabetic parameters through in vivo and in vitro experiments. METHODS: Adult WKY male rats were randomly distributed in nine groups: intact control, diabetic control, diabetic + 625 mg/kg, 1.25 g/kg UD, diabetic + 100 mg/kg Metformin, diabetic + swimming, diabetic + swimming 625 mg/kg, 1.25 g/kg UD, and diabetic +100 mg/kg Metformin + swimming. The hearts of the animals were punctured, and blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis. The entire pancreas was exposed for histologic examination. The effect of UD on insulin secretion by RIN-5F cells in 6.25 or 12.5 mM glucose dose was examined. Glucose uptake by cultured L6 myotubes was determined. RESULTS: The serum glucose concentration decreased, the insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity significantly increased in treated groups. These changes were more pronounced in the group that received UD extract and swimming training. Regeneration and less beta cell damage of Langerhans islets were observed in the treated groups. UD treatment increased insulin secretion in the RIN-5F cells and glucose uptake in the L6 myotubes cells. CONCLUSIONS: Swimming exercises accompanied by consuming UD aqueous extracts effectively improved diabetic parameters, repaired pancreatic tissues in streptozotocin-induced diabetics in vivo, and increased glucose uptake or insulin in UD-treated cells in vitro. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2015

Evaluation of Trigonella foenum-graecum extract in combination with swimming exercise compared to glibenclamide consumption on type 2 Diabetic rodents. 📎

Abstract Title: Evaluation of Trigonella foenum-graecum extract in combination with swimming exercise compared to glibenclamide consumption on type 2 Diabetic rodents. Abstract Source: Food Nutr Res. 2015 ;59:29717. Epub 2015 Dec 22. PMID: 26699937 Abstract Author(s): Sajad Arshadi, Mohammad Ali Azarbayjani, Fatemeh Hajaghaalipor, Ashril Yusof, Maghsoud Peeri, Salar Bakhtiyari, Robert S Stannard, Noor Azuan Abu Osman, Firouzeh Dehghan Article Affiliation: Sajad Arshadi Abstract: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of fenugreek seed extract in combination with swimming exercise compared to glibenclamide consumption on type 2 diabetic rats. DESIGN: The acute toxicity test was carried out to choose the safe doses and identify the toxicity effects of the fenugreek seed extract. To investigate the hypoglycemic effect of the extract and its effect in combination with swimming training, 80 Wistar Kyoto male streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were divided randomly into eight groups: diabetic control (C); fenugreek seed extract 0.8 g/kg (F1); fenugreek extract 1.6 g/kg (F2); swimming training (S); swimming training plus fenugreek extract 0.8 g/kg (SF1); swimming training plus fenugreek extract 1.6 g/kg (SF2); glibenclamide (G) and swimming training plus glibenclamide (SG). The rats were orally administrated with the treatments once a day with the respective treatment, and the training groups were subjected to swimming training every day for 60 min. Fasting blood samples were collected to measure fasting blood glucose, lipid profile, adiponectin, leptin, and insulin concentrations. RESULTS: The results obtained from acute toxicity study showed no toxicity effect of fenugreek seed extract on the tested dose. Biochemical analysis showed significant improvements in all of the groups compared to the control group (p<0.05). Plasma insulin concentration and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was significantly reduced in treated groups compared with the diabetic control group. Plasma leptin were significantly decreased in treated groups compared with the control group; while adiponectin had markedly increased (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that fenugreek seed consuming, alongside swimming exercise, has a strong therapeutic effect on the improvement of diabetic parameters. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2014

Effects of probiotic yogurt on performance, respiratory and digestive systems of young adult female endurance swimmers: a randomized controlled trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Effects of probiotic yogurt on performance, respiratory and digestive systems of young adult female endurance swimmers: a randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: Med J Islam Repub Iran. 2013 Aug ;27(3):141-6. PMID: 24791124 Abstract Author(s): Nahid Salarkia, Leili Ghadamli, Farid Zaeri, Leila Sabaghian Rad Article Affiliation: Nahid Salarkia Abstract: BACKGROUND: To determine the effects of probiotic yogurt on performance and health status of young adultfemale endurance swimmers. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial, 46 endurance swimmers girls with mean age of 13.8±1.8 years,weight of 48.6±7.5kg and height of 159±5.6cm, were studied. Subjects were randomly assigned into two groups,receiving either 400 ml probiotic yogurt (intervention group) or ordinary yogurt (control group) daily for 8weeks. At the beginning and at the end of the study, the 400-m free swimming record was done and the HarvardStep test was employed to measure VO2max. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using SPSS software.This trial has been registered with IRCT ID of IRCT2012122311849N1. RESULTS: Average changes in the records of the intervention and control groups were 3.9 and 0.5 seconds, respectively(p= 0.22). The intervention group complained of dyspnea for 2.4 days and the value for the controlwas 4.4 days (p=0.024). Values for ear pain were 0.5 and 1.6 days (p=0.008) respectively. The average numberof episodes of respiratory infection in the intervention group was 0.9 day, which was statistically fewer than thatin the control group (1.4 days), P=0.009. CONCLUSIONS: A reduction in the number of episodes of respiratory infections and duration of some symptomssuch as dyspnea and ear pain was observed. Due to the reduction in upper respiratory tract infections of theathletes following intake of probiotic yogurt, improvement in VO2max is possible. Article Published Date : Jul 31, 2013

Low-Intensity swimming training after weaning improves glucose and lipid homeostasis in MSG hypothalamic obese mice.

Abstract Title: Low-Intensity swimming training after weaning improves glucose and lipid homeostasis in MSG hypothalamic obese mice. Abstract Source: Biomed Sci Instrum. 2007;43:272-7. PMID: 21539446 Abstract Author(s): Dionízia Xavier Scomparin, Sabrina Grassiolli, Rodrigo Mello Gomes, Rosana Torrezan, Júlio Cezar de Oliveira, Clarice Gravena, Carolina Costa Pêra, Paulo Cezar de Freitas Mathias Article Affiliation: Laboratory of Secretion Cell Biology, Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, State University of Maringá, Maringá, Paraná, Brazil. Abstract: Low-intensity swimming training, started at an early age, was undertaken to observe glycemic control in hypothalamic obese mice produced by neonatal monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) treatment. Although swimming exercises by weaning pups inhibited hypothalamic obesity onset and recovered sympathoadrenal axis activity, this event was not observed when exercise training is applied to young adult mice. However, the mechanisms producing this improved metabolism are still not fully understood. Current work verifies whether, besides reducing fat tissue accumulation, low-intensity swimming in MSG-weaned mice also improves glycemic control. Although MSG and control mice swam for 15 min/day, 3 days a week, from the weaning stage up to 90 days old, sedentary MSG and normal mice did not exercise at all. After 14 h of fasting, animals were killed at 90 days of age. Retroperitonial fat accumulation was measured to estimate obesity. Fasting blood glucose and insulin concentrations were also measured. Mice were also submitted to ipGTT. MSG obese mice showed fasting hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, the exercise was able to block MSG treatment effects. Higher total cholesterol and triglycerides observed in MSG mice were normalized by exercise after weaning. Exercised MSG animals had higher HDLc than the sedentary group. Data suggest that early exercise training maintains normoglycemia, insulin tissue sensitivity, and normal lipid profile in mice programmed to develop metabolic syndrome. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2007
Therapeutic Actions EXERCISE Swimming

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The effect of a high-impact jumping intervention on bone mass, bone stiffness and fitness parameters in adolescent athletes.

Related Articles The effect of a high-impact jumping intervention on bone mass, bone stiffness and fitness parameters in adolescent athletes. Arch Osteoporos. 2018 Nov 17;13(1):128 Authors: Vlachopoulos D, Barker AR, Ubago-Guisado E, Williams CA, Gracia-Marco L Abstract This study demonstrates that a 9-month jumping intervention can improve bone mass gains and physical fitness performance in adolescent males participating in non-osteogenic sports, such as swimming and cycling. PURPOSE: To examine the effect of a jumping intervention on bone mass, bone stiffness and fitness parameters in adolescents involved in different sports. METHODS: Ninety-three adolescent male swimmers (SWI), footballers (FOO) and cyclists (CYC) were randomised to intervention (INT) and sport (INT-SWI = 19, INT-FOO = 15, INT-CYC = 14) or sport only (CON-SWI = 18, CON-FOO = 15, CON-CYC = 12) groups. The 9-month jumping intervention consisted of 3 levels (12 weeks each) of 20 repetitions per set of counter movement jumps (CMJ) using adjustable weight vests (level 1 = 20 CMJ jumps/set, 0 kg, 3 sets/day, 3 times/week; level 2 = 20 CMJ jumps/set, 2 kg, 4 sets/day, 3 times/week; level 3 = 20 CMJ jumps/set, 5 kg, 4 sets/day, 4 times/week). Total body bone mineral content (BMC) at total body less head (TBLH) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and bone stiffness using quantitative ultrasound. Fitness was assessed using the 20-m shuttle run (20mSRT), CMJ and standing long jump (SLJ) tests. RESULTS: INT-SWI had significantly higher increase in BMC legs and bone stiffness compared to CON-SWI (4.2-12.7%). INT-CYC had significantly higher increase in BMC at TBLH and legs and bone stiffness compared to CON-CYC (5.0-12.3%). There were no significant differences between INT-FOO and CON-FOO in any bone outcomes (0.9-3.9%). The increase in CMJ performance was significantly higher in INT-SWI (3.1 cm) and INT-CYC (3.2 cm) compared to CON-SWI and CON-CYC groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A 9-month jumping intervention can improve bone mass, bone stiffness and muscular fitness in adolescent males participating in non-osteogenic sports, such as swimming and cycling. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN17982776. PMID: 30446875 [PubMed - in process]

The role of nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in selegiline antidepressant-like effect in the mice forced swim test.

Related Articles The role of nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in selegiline antidepressant-like effect in the mice forced swim test. Pharmacol Rep. 2018 Oct;70(5):1015-1022 Authors: Ostadhadi S, Shakiba S, Norouzi-Javidan A, Nikoui V, Zolfaghari S, Chamanara M, Dehpour AR Abstract BACKGROUND: Considering the pivotal role of nitric oxide (NO) pathway in depressive disorders, the aim of the present study was to investigate the antidepressant-like effect of selegiline in mice forced swimming test (FST), and possible involvement of NO-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in this action. METHODS: After assessment of locomotor activity in open-field test, mice were forced to swim individually and the immobility time of the last 4min was evaluated. All drugs were given intraperitoneally (ip). RESULTS: Selegiline (10mg/kg) decreased the immobility time in the FST similar to fluoxetine (20mg/kg). Pretreatment with l-arginine (NO precursor, 750mg/kg) or sildenafil (a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, 5mg/kg) significantly reversed the selegiline anti-immobility effect. Sub-effective dose of selegiline (1mg/kg) showed a synergistic antidepressant effect with NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, inhibitor of NO synthase, 10mg/kg) or 7-nitroindazole (specific neuronal NO synthase inhibitor, 30mg/kg), but not with aminoguanidine (specific inducible NO synthase inhibitor, 50mg/kg). Pretreatment of mice with methylene blue (an inhibitor of NO synthase and soluble guanylyl cyclase, 10mg/kg) significantly produced a synergistic response with the sub-effective dose of selegiline. Neither of the drugs changed the locomotor activity. Also, hippocampal and prefrontal cortex (PFC) nitrite content was significantly lower in selegiline-injected mice compared to saline-administrated mice. Also, co-injection of 7-nitroindazole with selegiline produced a significant reduction in hippocampal or PFC nitrite contents. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that selegiline possesses antidepressant-like effect in mice FST through inhibition of l-arginine-NO-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. PMID: 30144662 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

A prospective injury surveillance study in canyoning.

Related Articles A prospective injury surveillance study in canyoning. Injury. 2018 Apr;49(4):792-797 Authors: Ernstbrunner L, Schulz E, Ernstbrunner M, Hoffelner T, Freude T, Resch H, Haas M Abstract INTRODUCTION: Little is known about injuries in canyoning. It was the purpose of this study to determine injury rates, patterns, causes and risk factors in canyoning; and to identify targets for future injury prevention strategies. METHODS: From May to October 2015, 109 participants from 17 different countries were prospectively followed via a monthly e-mail-based questionnaire. RESULTS: During 13,690 h of canyoning, 57 injury-events occurred. The overall injury-rate was 4.2 injuries/1000 h of canyoning. The hand (23%) and lower leg and foot (25%) were most frequently involved. Most of the injuries were mild (n = 27, 49%) and limited to the soft-tissue. There were seven severe injuries (12%) with two lateral malleolar fractures, both necessitating surgery. The majority of injuries were due to material failure (44%) and significantly more injury-events were reported when the tour included rappelling (p = 0.037). Canyoning guides suffered from significantly less injuries compared to beginners and advanced canyoneers (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of canyoning injuries are mild. On the other side, roughly one-tenth suffered from severe injury. Canyoning guides are less prone to injury-events and beginners should consider performing tours with experienced guides. Notwithstanding, rappelling was the most common activity associated with an injury and the material used was deemed causative for an injury-event in almost half of all cases. Further improvement in canyoning equipment, frequent equipment service, and instructional courses to ensure adequate employment of equipment might minimize the risk of getting injured. PMID: 29530512 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Oxygen, animals and aquatic bioturbation: An updated account.

Related Articles Oxygen, animals and aquatic bioturbation: An updated account. Geobiology. 2018 01;16(1):3-16 Authors: Butterfield NJ PMID: 29130581 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]