CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Sweating

Human Excretion of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Flame Retardants: Blood, Urine, and Sweat Study. 📎

Abstract Title: Human Excretion of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Flame Retardants: Blood, Urine, and Sweat Study. Abstract Source: Biomed Res Int. 2017 ;2017:3676089. Epub 2017 Mar 8. PMID: 28373979 Abstract Author(s): Shelagh K Genuis, Detlef Birkholz, Stephen J Genuis Article Affiliation: Shelagh K Genuis Abstract: Commonly used as flame retardants, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are routinely detected in the environment, animals, and humans. Although these persistent organic pollutants are increasingly recognized as having serious health implications, particularly for children, this is the first study, to our knowledge, to investigate an intervention for human elimination of bioaccumulated PBDEs. Objectives. To determine the efficacy of blood, urine, and perspiration as PBDE biomonitoring mediums; assess excretion of five common PBDE congeners (28, 47, 99, 100, and 153) in urine and perspiration; and explore the potential of induced sweating for decreasing bioaccumulated PBDEs. Results. PBDE congeners were not found in urine samples; findings focus on blood and perspiration. 80% of participants tested positive in one or more body fluids for PBDE 28, 100% for PBDE 47, 95% for PBDE 99, and 90% for PBDE 100 and PBDE 153. Induced perspiration facilitated excretion of the five congeners, with different rates of excretion for different congeners. Conclusion. Blood testing provides only a partial understanding of human PBDE bioaccumulation; testing of both blood and perspiration provides a better understanding. This study provides important baseline evidence for regular induced perspiration as a potential means for therapeutic PBDE elimination. Fetotoxic and reproductive effects of PBDE exposure highlight the importance of further detoxification research. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2016

Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in sweat: a systematic review. 📎

Abstract Title: Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in sweat: a systematic review. Abstract Source: J Environ Public Health. 2012 ;2012:184745. Epub 2012 Feb 22. PMID: 22505948 Abstract Author(s): Margaret E Sears, Kathleen J Kerr, Riina I Bray Article Affiliation: Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L1. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury exposures are ubiquitous. These toxic elements have no physiological benefits, engendering interest in minimizing body burden. The physiological process of sweating has long been regarded as"cleansing"and of low risk. Reports of toxicant levels in sweat were sought in Medline, Embase, Toxline, Biosis, and AMED as well as reference lists and grey literature, from inception to March 22, 2011. Of 122 records identified, 24 were included in evidence synthesis. Populations, and sweat collection methods and concentrations varied widely. In individuals with higher exposure or body burden, sweat generally exceeded plasma or urine concentrations, and dermal could match or surpass urinary daily excretion. Arsenic dermal excretion was severalfold higher in arsenic-exposed individuals than in unexposed controls. Cadmium was more concentrated in sweat than in blood plasma. Sweat lead was associated with high-molecular-weight molecules, and in an interventional study, levels were higher with endurance compared with intensive exercise. Mercury levels normalized with repeated saunas in a case report. Sweating deserves consideration for toxic element detoxification. Research including appropriately sized trials is needed to establish safe, effective therapeutic protocols. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2011

Human elimination of phthalate compounds: blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) study. 📎

Abstract Title: Human elimination of phthalate compounds: blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) study. Abstract Source: ScientificWorldJournal. 2012 ;2012:615068. Epub 2012 Oct 31. PMID: 23213291 Abstract Author(s): Stephen J Genuis, Sanjay Beesoon, Rebecca A Lobo, Detlef Birkholz Article Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, 2935-66 Street, Edmonton, AB T6K 4C1, Canada. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Individual members of the phthalate family of chemical compounds are components of innumerable everyday consumer products, resulting in a high exposure scenario for some individuals and population groups. Multiple epidemiological studies have demonstrated statistically significant exposure-disease relationships involving phthalates and toxicological studies have shown estrogenic effects in vitro. Data is lacking in the medical literature, however, on effective means to facilitate phthalate excretion. METHODS: Blood, urine, and sweat were collected from 20 individuals (10 healthy participants and 10 participants with assorted health problems) and analyzed for parent phthalate compounds as well as phthalate metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Some parent phthalates as well as their metabolites were excreted into sweat. All patients had MEHP (mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate) in their blood, sweat, and urine samples, suggesting widespread phthalate exposure. In several individuals, DEHP (di (2-ethylhexl) phthalate) was found in sweat but not in serum, suggesting the possibility of phthalate retention and bioaccumulation. On average, MEHP concentration in sweat was more than twice as high as urine levels. CONCLUSIONS: Induced perspiration may be useful to facilitate elimination of some potentially toxic phthalate compounds including DEHP and MEHP. Sweat analysis may be helpful in establishing the existence of accrued DEHP in the human body. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2011

Human excretion of bisphenol A: blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) study. 📎

Abstract Title: Human excretion of bisphenol A: blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) study. Abstract Source: J Environ Public Health. 2012 ;2012:185731. Epub 2011 Dec 27. PMID: 22253637 Abstract Author(s): Stephen J Genuis, Sanjay Beesoon, Detlef Birkholz, Rebecca A Lobo Article Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Bisphenol A (BPA) is an ubiquitous chemical contaminant that has recently been associated with adverse effects on human health. There is incomplete understanding of BPA toxicokinetics, and there are no established interventions to eliminate this compound from the human body. Using 20 study participants, this study was designed to assess the relative concentration of BPA in three body fluids-blood, urine, and sweat-and to determine whether induced sweating may be a therapeutic intervention with potential to facilitate elimination of this compound. METHODS: Blood, urine, and sweat were collected from 20 individuals (10 healthy participants and 10 participants with assorted health problems) and analyzed for various environmental toxicants including BPA. RESULTS: BPA was found to differing degrees in each of blood, urine, and sweat. In 16 of 20 participants, BPA was identified in sweat, even in some individuals with no BPA detected in their serum or urine samples. CONCLUSIONS: Biomonitoring of BPA through blood and/or urine testing may underestimate the total body burden of this potential toxicant. Sweat analysis should be considered as an additional method for monitoring bioaccumulation of BPA in humans. Induced sweating appears to be a potential method for elimination of BPA. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2011

Blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) study: monitoring and elimination of bioaccumulated toxic elements.

Abstract Title: Blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) study: monitoring and elimination of bioaccumulated toxic elements. Abstract Source: Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 2011 Aug ;61(2):344-57. Epub 2010 Nov 6. PMID: 21057782 Abstract Author(s): Stephen J Genuis, Detlef Birkholz, Ilia Rodushkin, Sanjay Beesoon Article Affiliation: University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: There is limited understanding of the toxicokinetics of bioaccumulated toxic elements and their methods of excretion from the human body. This study was designed to assess the concentration of various toxic elements in three body fluids: blood, urine and sweat. Blood, urine, and sweat were collected from 20 individuals (10 healthy participants and 10 participants with various health problems) and analyzed for approximately 120 various compounds, including toxic elements. Toxic elements were found to differing degrees in each of blood, urine, and sweat. Serum levels for most metals and metalloids were comparable with those found in other studies in the scientific literature. Many toxic elements appeared to be preferentially excreted through sweat. Presumably stored in tissues, some toxic elements readily identified in the perspiration of some participants were not found in their serum. Induced sweating appears to be a potential method for elimination of many toxic elements from the human body. Biomonitoring for toxic elements through blood and/or urine testing may underestimate the total body burden of such toxicants. Sweat analysis should be considered as an additional method for monitoring bioaccumulation of toxic elements in humans. Article Published Date : Jul 31, 2011
Therapeutic Actions Sweating

NCBI pubmed

Local arginase inhibition does not modulate cutaneous vasodilation or sweating in young and older men during exercise.

Related Articles Local arginase inhibition does not modulate cutaneous vasodilation or sweating in young and older men during exercise. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2019 Jan 17;: Authors: Meade RD, Fujii N, McGarr GW, Alexander LM, Boulay P, Sigal RJ, Kenny GP Abstract Age-related impairments in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate (SR) during exercise may result from increased arginase activity, which can attenuate endogenous nitric oxide (NO) production. We therefore evaluated whether arginase inhibition modulates these heat loss responses in young (n=9, 23±3 years) and older (n=9, 66 ± 6 years) men during two 30-min bouts of moderate-intensity cycling (Ex1 and Ex2) in the heat (35°C). CVC and SR were measured at forearm skin sites perfused with: 1) lactated Ringer's (Control); 2) NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, NO synthase-inhibited); or 3) Nω-hydroxy-nor-Arginine and S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (Nor-NOHA + BEC, arginase-inhibited). In both groups, CVC was reduced at L-NAME relative to Control and Nor-NOHA + BEC (both P<0.01). Likewise, SR was attenuated with L-NAME compared to Control and Nor-NOHA + BEC during each exercise bout in the young (all P≤0.05); however, no influence of treatment on SR in the older men ( P=0.14). Based on these findings, we then evaluated responses in seven older men (64 ± 7 years) during passively-induced elevations in esophageal temperature (∆Tes) equal to those in Ex1 (0.6°C) and Ex2 (0.8°C). L-NAME reduced CVC by 18 ± 20%CVCmax at a ∆Tes of 0.8°C ( P=0.03) compared to Control whereas Nor-NOHA + BEC augmented CVC by 20 ± 18%CVCmax, on average, throughout heating (both P≤0.03). SR was not influenced by either treatment ( P=0.80) Thus, arginase inhibition does not modulate CVC or SR during exercise in the heat, but, consistent with previous findings, augments CVC in older men during passive heating. PMID: 30653418 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Update on treatments for nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease-an evidence-based medicine review.

Related Articles Update on treatments for nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease-an evidence-based medicine review. Mov Disord. 2019 Jan 17;: Authors: Seppi K, Ray Chaudhuri K, Coelho M, Fox SH, Katzenschlager R, Lloret SP, Weintraub D, Sampaio C, and the collaborators of the Parkinson's Disease Update on Non-Motor Symptoms Study Group on behalf of the Movement Disorders Society Evidence-Based Medicine Committee Abstract OBJECTIVE: To update evidence-based medicine recommendations for treating nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). BACKGROUND: The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Evidence-Based Medicine Committee's recommendations for treatments of PD were first published in 2002, updated in 2011, and now updated again through December 31, 2016. METHODS: Level I studies testing pharmacological, surgical, or nonpharmacological interventions for the treatment of nonmotor symptoms in PD were reviewed. Criteria for inclusion and quality scoring were as previously reported. The disorders covered were a range of neuropsychiatric symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, disorders of sleep and wakefulness, pain, fatigue, impaired olfaction, and ophthalmologic dysfunction. Clinical efficacy, implications for clinical practice, and safety conclusions are reported. RESULTS: A total of 37 new studies qualified for review. There were no randomized controlled trials that met inclusion criteria for the treatment of anxiety disorders, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, excessive sweating, impaired olfaction, or ophthalmologic dysfunction. We identified clinically useful or possibly useful interventions for the treatment of depression, apathy, impulse control and related disorders, dementia, psychosis, insomnia, daytime sleepiness, drooling, orthostatic hypotension, gastrointestinal dysfunction, urinary dysfunction, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, and pain. There were no clinically useful interventions identified to treat non-dementia-level cognitive impairment. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence base for treating a range of nonmotor symptoms in PD has grown substantially in recent years. However, treatment options overall remain limited given the high prevalence and adverse impact of these disorders, so the development and testing of new treatments for nonmotor symptoms in PD remains a top priority. © 2019 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID: 30653247 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Type III B endoleak leading to aortic rupture after endovascular repair: analysis of errors in follow up and treatment.

Related Articles Type III B endoleak leading to aortic rupture after endovascular repair: analysis of errors in follow up and treatment. CVIR Endovasc. 2018;1(1):9 Authors: Leopardi M, Salerno A, Scarpelli P, Ventura M Abstract Background: The aim of this paper is to describe the case of a patient with a type III endoleak which was misdiagnosed and treated without success as a type I-II endoleak. An incorrect endoleak diagnosis lead to aortic rupture, which could be avoided with a correct diagnosis. Type III B endoleaks presents some diagnostic difficulties, in the case we describe, they were increased by late presentation and poor follow up. Case presentation: We revised this 89 years old patient history, he underwent EVAR 11 years before, a control scan six month after surgery, showed a type I-II endoleak which was still present after first intervention. He was treated with proximal cuff positioning and embolization coils. Eight years after first intervention, a Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) showed persisting type I-II endoleak so same problem was suspected and patient was treated with another proximal cuff and right iliac extension. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) control, six months later, showed an increase of the aneurysm sac size of 12 mm. Two years later patient presented at emergency room at our hospital with malaise, sweating and abdominal pain. Computed Tomography (CT-scan) showed increased abdominal aortic diameter (140 × 130 mm) with rupture and hemoperitoneum. He was treated in urgent fashion with endograft removal and aortic-iliac Dacron graft reconstruction. During surgery three large tears on endograft fabric and a stent suture rupture were observed. After surgery patient was admitted in intensive care unit and died on second postoperative day due to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Type III endoleak is an uncommon complication: a correct and prompt diagnosis is mandatory for appropriate treatment After EVAR, and especially in those cases of known endoleak, a correct follow-up is mandatory and in case of diagnostic doubts correct imaging should be performed. Media contrast allergies should not be neglected and should not represent a CTA limitation. PMID: 30652142 [PubMed]

A novel anatomical woodworking chisel handle.

Related Articles A novel anatomical woodworking chisel handle. Appl Ergon. 2019 Apr;76:38-47 Authors: Bisht DS, Khan MR Abstract A novel anatomically shaped ("anatomical") woodworking chisel handle was developed for wood scraping operation. 18 students participated in an evaluation study to compare the new handle against seven readymade handles of ¾-inch bench chisels in the context of a standard wood scraping task. A comfort questionnaire for hand tools (CQH) and a hand-based pain map were used for evaluating and comparing the handles. 'Functionality' and 'sweating' were found to be the most and least important comfort concerns, respectively. Maximum pain was reported at distal digit 1, and least pain at proximal digit 4. The anatomical handle was rated best for most of the comfort descriptors, least painful for most hand regions and took the least time for a standardized task. PMID: 30642523 [PubMed - in process]
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