Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Low Glycemic Load

Clinical and histological effect of a low glycaemic load diet in treatment of acne vulgaris in Korean patients: a randomized, controlled trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Clinical and histological effect of a low glycaemic load diet in treatment of acne vulgaris in Korean patients: a randomized, controlled trial. Abstract Source: Acta Derm Venereol. 2012 May ;92(3):241-6. PMID: 22678562 Abstract Author(s): Hyuck Hoon Kwon, Ji Young Yoon, Jong Soo Hong, Jae Yoon Jung, Mi Sun Park, Dae Hun Suh Article Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Abstract: Recent studies have suggested that dietary factors, specifically glycaemic load, may be involved in the pathogenesis of acne. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and histological effects on acne lesions of a low glycaemic load diet. A total of 32 patients with mild to moderate acne were randomly assigned to either a low glycaemic load diet or a control group diet, and completed a 10-week, parallel dietary intervention trial. Results indicate successful lowering of the glycaemic load. Subjects within the low glycaemic group demonstrated significant clinical improvement in the number of both non-inflammatory and inflammatory acne lesions. Histopathological examination of skin samples revealed several characteristics, including reduced size of sebaceous glands, decreased inflammation, and reduced expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1, and interleukin-8 in the low glycaemic load group. A reduction in glycaemic load of the diet for 10 weeks resulted in improvements in acne. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2012

Effect of a low glycemic load on body composition and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) in overweight and obese subjects. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of a low glycemic load on body composition and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) in overweight and obese subjects. Abstract Source: Nutr Hosp. 2011 Feb;26(1):170-175. PMID: 21519744 Abstract Author(s): A L Armendáriz-Anguiano, A Jiménez-Cruz, M Bacardí-Gascón, L Hurtado-Ayala Article Affiliation: Medicine and Psychology School, Universidad Auntónoma de Baja California, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different glycemic load diets on biochemical data and body composition, in overweight and obese subjects, during a 6-month period. Research design and methods: This study was an experimental, randomized, parallel design. Anthropo-metric measurements and biochemical data were measured at baseline at 3 and at 6 months. All subjects completed 3-day dietary intake diaries at the baseline period and during the third and the sixth months. At the sixth month, LGL group had a mean intake of 1,360± 300 kcal/day and the high glycemic load group (HGL) had a mean intake of 1,544 ± 595 kcal/day. Results: LGL group obtained a weight reduction of 4.5% (p = 0.006) and the HGL group of 3.0% (p = 0.18). Significant reductions in waist circumference (5%, p = 0.001) of the LGL group were observed, 10% of body fat percentage (p = 0.001), 4.3 kg (13%) of body fat (p = 0.001), 14% of total cholesterol (p=0.007), 35% of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (p = 0.001), and 10% of HOMA (p = 0.009). In the HGL group, reductions of 4.5% of waist circumference (p = 0.02), 37% of HDL (p = 0.002), and an increase of 8 % of LDL (p = 0.04) were observed. Conclusions: These results suggest that long term LGL diets are more effective for reducing body mass index, body fat, waist circumference and HOMA and, therefore, may contribute in the prevention of diabetes. Article Published Date : Feb 01, 2011

Does diet really affect acne? 📎

Abstract Title: Does diet really affect acne? Abstract Source: Skin Therapy Lett. 2010 Mar ;15(3):1-2, 5. PMID: 20361171 Abstract Author(s): H R Ferdowsian, S Levin Article Affiliation: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. Abstract: Acne vulgaris has anecdotally been attributed to diet by individuals affected by this skin condition. In a 2009 systematic literature review of 21 observational studies and 6 clinical trials, the association between acne and diet was evaluated. Observational studies, including 2 large controlled prospective trials, reported that cow's milk intake increased acne prevalence and severity. Furthermore, prospective studies, including randomized controlled trials, demonstrated a positive association between a high-glycemic-load diet, hormonal mediators, and acne risk. Based on these findings, there exists convincing data supporting the role of dairy products and high-glycemic-index foods in influencing hormonal and inflammatory factors, which can increase acne prevalence and severity. Studies have been inconclusive regarding the association between acne and other foods. Article Published Date : Feb 28, 2010
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Low Glycemic Load

NCBI pubmed

The relationship between carbohydrate quality and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome: challenges of glycemic index and glycemic load.

Related Articles The relationship between carbohydrate quality and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome: challenges of glycemic index and glycemic load. Eur J Nutr. 2018 Apr;57(3):1197-1205 Authors: de Mello Fontanelli M, Sales CH, Carioca AAF, Marchioni DM, Fisberg RM Abstract PURPOSE: To estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in adults and older adults residents of São Paulo, the association of MetS with the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) and the foods that contribute to dietary GI and GL in this population. METHODS: Data from 591 adults and older adults participants in the Health Survey of São Paulo were used. This is a cross-sectional, population-based study with a complex multistage sample design of residents in the urban area of the municipality. Dietary consumption data, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure and blood samples were collected. The associations between GI, GL and MetS and its components were tested using logistic regression models, considering the sample design of the study. RESULTS: The prevalence of MetS in the adult and older adults residents of São Paulo was 30.3%. There was no association between GI, GL and MetS. GI and GL were positively associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), OR = 1.113 (95% CI 1.007-1.230) and OR = 1.019 (95% CI 1.002-1.037), respectively. GL was inversely associated with high blood pressure and this association differed by age group (OR = 0.981; 95% CI 0.964-0.998). Foods that most contributed to dietary GI and GL were sugar, white rice and French bread. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the high prevalence of low HDL-c in the population of São Paulo, GI and GL may contribute to the nutritional therapy of this dyslipidemia. However, findings should be treated with caution, considering several conflicting results between studies. PMID: 28251342 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]