Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Naturopathic Care

Naturopathic treatment of rotator cuff tendinitis among Canadian postal workers: a randomized controlled trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Naturopathic treatment of rotator cuff tendinitis among Canadian postal workers: a randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Aug 15;61(8):1037-45. PMID: 19644905 Abstract Author(s): Orest Szczurko, Kieran Cooley, Edward J Mills, Qi Zhou, Dan Perri, Dugald Seely Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To explore the effectiveness of naturopathic care (NC) on rotator cuff tendinitis using a prospective randomized clinical trial design. METHODS: Canadian postal workers with rotator cuff tendinitis for a duration of >6 weeks were randomized to receive NC (n = 43) or standardized physical exercises (PEs; n = 42) over 12 weeks. Participants in the NC group received dietary counseling, acupuncture, and Phlogenzym (2 tablets 3 times/day). The PE intervention group received passive, active-assisted, and active range of motion exercises and matched placebo. The primary outcome measure was the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), and secondary outcomes were the pain visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form 36 (SF-36), Measure Yourself Medical Outcomes Profile (MYMOP), and shoulder maximal range of motion. Participants and assessors were blinded to group and placebo allocation. RESULTS: Seventy-seven participants (87%) completed >or=8 weeks of the trial. Final total SPADI scores decreased by 54.5% (P < 0.0001) in the NC group and by 18% (P = 0.0241) in the PE group. Between-group differences in changes to SPADI scores showed statistically significant decreases in shoulder pain and disability in the NC group compared with the PE group (P < 0.0001). Significant differences between groups were also observed in the pain VAS, MYMOP, SF-36, and shoulder extension, flexion, and abduction, with the NC group showing superiority in each outcome. No serious adverse reactions were observed. CONCLUSION: NC and PE provided significant improvements, with greater improvement in shoulder function in the NC group compared with the PE group. Statistically significant improvements in quality of life measures were observed in the NC group as compared with the PE group. Article Published Date : Aug 15, 2009

Naturopathic therapy for acute otitis media. An alternative to the primary use of antibiotics

Abstract Title: [Naturopathic therapy for acute otitis media. An alternative to the primary use of antibiotics]. Abstract Source: HNO. 2005 Aug;53(8):728-34. PMID: 15614570 Abstract Author(s): T P U Wustrow Article Affiliation: HNO-Gemeinschaftspraxis, München. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: First line antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated acute otitis media has been questioned. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In an prospective, open, controlled study, 390 children aged 1-10 years were treated either conventionally (free combinations of decongestant nose drops, mucolytics, analgesics and antibiotics) or alternatively with Otovowen, supplemented by conventional medications when considered necessary. RESULTS: Patients treated conventionally took more antibiotics (80.5% vs 14.4%) and analgesics (66.8% vs 53.2%). The time to recovery (5.3 vs 5.1 days) and absence from school or pre-school nursery (both 1.7 days) were not significantly different between groups. Pain resolution was slightly better with conventional treatment (-5.8 vs -5.2 score points). The alternative treatment was judged both by doctors, and parents, to be significantly better tolerated. CONCLUSION: In uncomplicated acute otitis media of childhood, an alternative treatment strategy with the natural medicine Otovowen may substantially reduce the use of antibiotics without disadvantage to the clinical outcome. Article Published Date : Aug 01, 2005
Therapeutic Actions Naturopathic Care

NCBI pubmed

Cannabidiol in the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Case Series.

Related Articles Cannabidiol in the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Case Series. J Altern Complement Med. 2018 Dec 13;: Authors: Elms L, Shannon S, Hughes S, Lewis N Abstract OBJECTIVES: Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychotomimetic cannabinoid compound that is found in plants of the genus Cannabis. Preclinical research has suggested that CBD may have a beneficial effect in rodent models of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This effect is believed to be due to the action of CBD on the endocannabinoid system. CBD has seen a recent surge in research regarding its potential value in a number of neuro-psychiatric conditions. This is the first study to date examining the clinical benefit of CBD for patients with PTSD. METHODS: This retrospective case series examines the effect of oral CBD administration on symptoms of PTSD in a series of 11 adult patients at an outpatient psychiatry clinic. CBD was given on an open-label, flexible dosing regimen to patients diagnosed with PTSD by a mental health professional. Patients also received routine psychiatric care, including concurrent treatment with psychiatric medications and psychotherapy. The length of the study was 8 weeks. PTSD symptom severity was assessed every 4 weeks by patient-completed PTSD Checklist for the DSM-5 (PCL-5) questionnaires. RESULTS: From the total sample of 11 patients, 91% (n = 10) experienced a decrease in PTSD symptom severity, as evidenced by a lower PCL-5 score at 8 weeks than at their initial baseline. The mean total PCL-5 score decreased 28%, from a mean baseline score of 51.82 down to 37.14, after eight consecutive weeks of treatment with CBD. CBD was generally well tolerated, and no patients discontinued treatment due to side effects. CONCLUSIONS: Administration of oral CBD in addition to routine psychiatric care was associated with PTSD symptom reduction in adults with PTSD. CBD also appeared to offer relief in a subset of patients who reported frequent nightmares as a symptom of their PTSD. Additional clinical investigation, including double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, would be necessary to further substantiate the response to CBD that was observed in this study. PMID: 30543451 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Effect of pasta in the context of low-glycaemic index dietary patterns on body weight and markers of adiposity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials in adults.

Related Articles Effect of pasta in the context of low-glycaemic index dietary patterns on body weight and markers of adiposity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials in adults. BMJ Open. 2018 04 02;8(3):e019438 Authors: Chiavaroli L, Kendall CWC, Braunstein CR, Blanco Mejia S, Leiter LA, Jenkins DJA, Sievenpiper JL Abstract OBJECTIVE: Carbohydrate staples such as pasta have been implicated in the obesity epidemic. It is unclear whether pasta contributes to weight gain or like other low-glycaemic index (GI) foods contributes to weight loss. We synthesised the evidence of the effect of pasta on measures of adiposity. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched through 7 February 2017. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING STUDIES: We included randomised controlled trials ≥3 weeks assessing the effect of pasta alone or in the context of low-GI dietary patterns on measures of global (body weight, body mass index (BMI), body fat) and regional (waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD)) adiposity in adults. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Data were pooled using the generic inverse-variance method and expressed as mean differences (MDs) with 95% CIs. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q statistic) and quantified (I2 statistic). GRADE assessed the certainty of the evidence. RESULTS: We identified no trial comparisons of the effect of pasta alone and 32 trial comparisons (n=2448 participants) of the effect of pasta in the context of low-GI dietary patterns. Pasta in the context of low-GI dietary patterns significantly reduced body weight (MD=-0.63 kg; 95% CI -0.84 to -0.42 kg) and BMI (MD=-0.26 kg/m2; 95% CI -0.36 to -0.16 kg/m2) compared with higher-GI dietary patterns. There was no effect on other measures of adiposity. The certainty of the evidence was graded as moderate for body weight, BMI, WHR and SAD and low for WC and body fat. CONCLUSIONS: Pasta in the context of low-GI dietary patterns does not adversely affect adiposity and even reduces body weight and BMI compared with higher-GI dietary patterns. Future trials should assess the effect of pasta in the context of other 'healthy' dietary patterns. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02961088; Results. PMID: 29615407 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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