Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Naturopathic Care

Naturopathic treatment of rotator cuff tendinitis among Canadian postal workers: a randomized controlled trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Naturopathic treatment of rotator cuff tendinitis among Canadian postal workers: a randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Aug 15;61(8):1037-45. PMID: 19644905 Abstract Author(s): Orest Szczurko, Kieran Cooley, Edward J Mills, Qi Zhou, Dan Perri, Dugald Seely Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To explore the effectiveness of naturopathic care (NC) on rotator cuff tendinitis using a prospective randomized clinical trial design. METHODS: Canadian postal workers with rotator cuff tendinitis for a duration of >6 weeks were randomized to receive NC (n = 43) or standardized physical exercises (PEs; n = 42) over 12 weeks. Participants in the NC group received dietary counseling, acupuncture, and Phlogenzym (2 tablets 3 times/day). The PE intervention group received passive, active-assisted, and active range of motion exercises and matched placebo. The primary outcome measure was the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), and secondary outcomes were the pain visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form 36 (SF-36), Measure Yourself Medical Outcomes Profile (MYMOP), and shoulder maximal range of motion. Participants and assessors were blinded to group and placebo allocation. RESULTS: Seventy-seven participants (87%) completed >or=8 weeks of the trial. Final total SPADI scores decreased by 54.5% (P < 0.0001) in the NC group and by 18% (P = 0.0241) in the PE group. Between-group differences in changes to SPADI scores showed statistically significant decreases in shoulder pain and disability in the NC group compared with the PE group (P < 0.0001). Significant differences between groups were also observed in the pain VAS, MYMOP, SF-36, and shoulder extension, flexion, and abduction, with the NC group showing superiority in each outcome. No serious adverse reactions were observed. CONCLUSION: NC and PE provided significant improvements, with greater improvement in shoulder function in the NC group compared with the PE group. Statistically significant improvements in quality of life measures were observed in the NC group as compared with the PE group. Article Published Date : Aug 15, 2009

Naturopathic therapy for acute otitis media. An alternative to the primary use of antibiotics

Abstract Title: [Naturopathic therapy for acute otitis media. An alternative to the primary use of antibiotics]. Abstract Source: HNO. 2005 Aug;53(8):728-34. PMID: 15614570 Abstract Author(s): T P U Wustrow Article Affiliation: HNO-Gemeinschaftspraxis, München. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: First line antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated acute otitis media has been questioned. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In an prospective, open, controlled study, 390 children aged 1-10 years were treated either conventionally (free combinations of decongestant nose drops, mucolytics, analgesics and antibiotics) or alternatively with Otovowen, supplemented by conventional medications when considered necessary. RESULTS: Patients treated conventionally took more antibiotics (80.5% vs 14.4%) and analgesics (66.8% vs 53.2%). The time to recovery (5.3 vs 5.1 days) and absence from school or pre-school nursery (both 1.7 days) were not significantly different between groups. Pain resolution was slightly better with conventional treatment (-5.8 vs -5.2 score points). The alternative treatment was judged both by doctors, and parents, to be significantly better tolerated. CONCLUSION: In uncomplicated acute otitis media of childhood, an alternative treatment strategy with the natural medicine Otovowen may substantially reduce the use of antibiotics without disadvantage to the clinical outcome. Article Published Date : Aug 01, 2005
Therapeutic Actions Naturopathic Care

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North American naturopathic medicine in the 21st century: Time for a seventh guiding principle - Scientia Critica.

Related Articles North American naturopathic medicine in the 21st century: Time for a seventh guiding principle - Scientia Critica. Explore (NY). 2018 Aug 02;: Authors: Logan AC, Goldenberg JZ, Guiltinan J, Seely D, Katz DL Abstract The World Health Organization strategy for global health includes a culturally-sensitive blending of western biomedicine with traditional forms of healing; in practical terms this approach is often referred to as integrative medicine. One distinct element within the systems of North American integrative healthcare is naturopathic medicine; while the basic premise of its fundamental approach to care - supporting healthy lifestyle behaviors - is as old as medicine itself, the early history of organized naturopathy in North America was heavy in theory and light on critical analysis. Dozens of questionable modalities and protocols have been housed under the rubric of naturopathy. It is our contention that the progression of professional naturopathic medicine in the 21st century - with goals of personal, public and planetary health - requires the active pursuit of critical analysis. We examine the primary guiding principles which drive the training and practice of North American naturopathic medicine; while these principles are laudable in the age of patient-centered care, we argue that there are shortcomings by absentia. We propose a seventh principle - Scientia Critica; that is, the ability to critically analyze accumulated knowledge - including scientific facts, knowledge about the self (critical consciousness) and values of the patient. PMID: 30217641 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]