Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Spiritual-Religious Practice

Adolescents' Spirituality and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Clearance Treatment Adherence: Examining Mediators. 📎

Abstract Title: Adolescents' Spirituality and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Clearance Treatment Adherence: Examining Mediators. Abstract Source: J Pediatr Psychol. 2016 Apr 1. Epub 2016 Apr 1. PMID: 27037417 Abstract Author(s): Daniel H Grossoehme, Rhonda D Szczesniak, Sylvie Mrug, Sophia M Dimitriou, Alec Marshall, Gary L McPhail Article Affiliation: Daniel H Grossoehme Abstract:  Adolescent cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment adherence is a significant multidimensional issue. Using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), this study examined the role of spiritual factors in adherence.  METHODS:  Forty-five 11-19-year-olds diagnosed with CF completed questionnaires concerning psychosocial, spiritual, and adherence-related constructs and Daily Phone Diaries to calculate treatment adherence. Exploratory Factor Analysis identified two spiritual factors used in subsequent analyses. The mediating roles of attitude toward the treatment's value (utility), subjective behavioral norms (the product of perceived behavioral norms and one's motivation to comply with them), self-efficacy for completing the treatments and treatment intentions in the relationship between spiritual factors and treatment adherence were tested with path analysis.  RESULTS:  Lower 'spiritual struggle' and greater 'engaged spirituality' predicted treatment attitude (utility) and subjective behavioral norms, which, together with self-efficacy, predicted treatment intentions. Finally, treatment intentions predicted airway clearance adherence.  CONCLUSIONS:  Findings were consistent with theTRA. Engaged spirituality supports pro-adherence determinants and behavior. Spiritual struggle's negative associations with outcomes warrant screening and intervention. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2016

Existential well-being and spirituality of individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is related to psychological well-being of their caregivers.

Abstract Title: Existential well-being and spirituality of individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is related to psychological well-being of their caregivers. Abstract Source: Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2011 Mar ;12(2):105-8. Epub 2010 Jul 26. PMID: 20653520 Abstract Author(s): Francesco Pagnini, Christian Lunetta, Gabriella Rossi, Paolo Banfi, Ksenija Gorni, Nadia Cellotto, Gianluca Castelnuovo, Enrico Molinari, Massimo Corbo Article Affiliation: Francesco Pagnini Abstract: Existential well-being (EWB) and spirituality issues are important factors in determining quality of life (QoL) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. No conclusive data among the relation between patient's EWB, their spirituality and caregivers' QoL are available. In the mainframe of a longitudinal study, we performed a cross-sectional analysis aimed to investigate EWB and spirituality issues in sporadic ALS (SALS) patients and the relations with caregivers' psychological features. Thirty-seven SALS patients, together with their caregivers, consecutively recruited at NEuroMuscular Omnicentre, in Milan, were included in this study. EWB and spirituality questions were administrated to patients and caregivers. Caregivers also completed questionnaires about quality of life (MQoL-SI), care burden (ZBI), depression (BDI) and anxiety (STAI). Both EWBs and questions about spirituality of SALS patients showed a positive correlation with MQoL-SI and EWBs in their caregivers. Conversely, SALS patients' EWB and spirituality were negatively correlated with caregivers' STAI, BDI and ZBI scores. In conclusion, existential well-being, as well as spirituality issues, perceived by SALS patients seems to be directly related with quality of life, severity of mood disturbance and burden experienced by their caregivers. Article Published Date : Feb 28, 2011

Study of the therapeutic effects of proximal intercessory prayer (STEPP) on auditory and visual impairments in rural Mozambique.

Abstract Title: Study of the therapeutic effects of proximal intercessory prayer (STEPP) on auditory and visual impairments in rural Mozambique. Abstract Source: South Med J. 2010 Sep;103(9):864-9. PMID: 20686441 Abstract Author(s): Candy Gunther Brown, Stephen C Mory, Rebecca Williams, Michael J McClymond Article Affiliation: Department of Religious Studies, Indiana University, 1033 E 3rd St., Bloomington, IN 47405-7005, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Proximal intercessory prayer (PIP) is a common complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy, but clinical effects are poorly understood, partly because studies have focused on distant intercessory prayer (DIP). METHODS: This prospective study used an audiometer (Earscan(R) 3) and vision charts (40 cm, 6 m "Illiterate E") to evaluate 24 consecutive Mozambican subjects (19 males/5 females) reporting impaired hearing (14) and/or vision (11) who subsequently received PIP interventions. RESULTS: We measured significant improvements in auditory (P<0.003) and visual (P<0.02) function across both tested populations. CONCLUSIONS: Rural Mozambican subjects exhibited improved audition and/or visual acuity subsequent to PIP. The magnitude of measured effects exceeds that reported in previous suggestion and hypnosis studies. Future study seems warranted to assess whether PIP may be a useful adjunct to standard medical care for certain patients with auditory and/or visual impairments, especially in contexts where access to conventional treatment is limited. Article Published Date : Sep 01, 2010

Spirituality as coping in Tibetan torture survivors

Abstract Title: [Spirituality as coping in Tibetan torture survivors]. Abstract Source: Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Jan 11;172(2):137-40. PMID: 20074492 Abstract Author(s): Peter Elsass, Jessica Carlsson, Kristian Husum Article Affiliation: Psykologisk Institut, Københavns Universitet, DK-1353 København K, Denmark. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: INTRODUCTION: There is solid documentation for the positive relationship between spirituality and health, but few examples of how this link may be used in projects of rehabilitation after war, civil conflicts and natural disasters. One such example is the Danida funded Tibetan Torture Program in India. This study aims to provide evidence of the Tibetan torture survivors' degree of traumatisation and their use of spirituality to overcome their difficult situation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study consists of an assessment and a rehabilitation part. A total of 102 Tibetan torture survivors were interviewed about their coping mechanisms in overcoming trauma. In all, 36 of these survivors were receiving counselling and both the clients and their 16 professionals were interviewed after the treatment with open-ended questions about what was helpful and not helpful. RESULTS: The torture survivors had symptoms of severe traumatisation (Hopkin's Symptom Checklist), but probably not as extensive as torture survivors from other cultures. CONCLUSION: The Tibetan torture survivors use Tibetan Buddhism as an important coping mechanism. Most clients expressed satisfaction with counselling, but criticised the crudeness of our methods. Article Published Date : Jan 11, 2010

Exploring heart and soul: effects of religiosity/spirituality and gender on blood pressure and cortisol stress responses.

Abstract Title: Exploring heart and soul: effects of religiosity/spirituality and gender on blood pressure and cortisol stress responses. Abstract Source: Integr Cancer Ther. 2008 Dec;7(4):311-6. PMID: 16176954 Abstract Author(s): Jessica Tartaro, Linda J Luecken, Heather E Gunn Abstract: The current study investigated gender effects on the influence of self-reported religiosity and spirituality on cardiovascular and cortisol responses to a laboratory stressor among young adults. Participants with higher composite religiosity/spirituality scores, religiosity, levels of forgiveness and frequency of prayer showed lower cortisol responses. Greater composite religiosity/spirituality, religiosity, frequency of prayer and attendance at services were associated with lower blood pressure in males and elevated blood pressure in females. Findings suggest that spiritual and/or religious individuals may experience a protective effect against the neuroendocrine consequences of stress, though cardiovascular benefits may vary by gender. This work represents an important step in the convergence of multiple realms of research by linking physiological measures with indicators of individual belief systems. Article Published Date : Dec 01, 2008

Religiosity may help preserve the cortisol rhythm in women with stress-related illness.

Abstract Title: Religiosity may help preserve the cortisol rhythm in women with stress-related illness. Abstract Source: Int J Psychiatry Med. 2004;34(1):61-77. PMID: 15242142 Abstract Author(s): Eric A Dedert, Jamie L Studts, Inka Weissbecker, Paul G Salmon, Phyllis L Banis, Sandra E Sephton Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Fibromyalgia has been characterized as a basic disorder of endocrine stress responses in which psychological stress has been linked both with etiology and symptom severity. This study investigated associations of religiosity and spirituality with psychological and physiological (endocrine) measures of stress in a sample of women with fibromyalgia. METHOD: Ninety-one participants provided self-reports of religiosity and spirituality using the Duke University Religion Index (DUREL) and the Index of Core Spiritual Experiences (INSPIRIT). Psychological outcomes were measured with the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and diurnal salivary cortisol profiles were measured as an indicator of neuroendocrine regulation. RESULTS: Hierarchal regression analyses controlling for age and medications likely to affect cortisol levels revealed significant associations of nonorganizational religiosity and intrinsic religiosity with the diurnal cortisol rhythm. Patients reporting medium or high religiosity had rhythmic cortisol profiles characterized by high morning and low evening levels. In contrast, cortisol rhythms of those reporting low religiosity appeared flattened. The association between intrinsic religiosity and cortisol rhythm persisted after controlling for social support. No significant effects of religiosity or spirituality on perceived stress were observed. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that religiosity may have a protective effect on the physiological effects of stress among women with fibromyalgia. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2004
Therapeutic Actions Spiritual-Religious Practice

NCBI pubmed

Spiritual and Religious coping and depression among family caregivers of pediatric cancer patients in Latin America.

Related Articles Spiritual and Religious coping and depression among family caregivers of pediatric cancer patients in Latin America. Psychooncology. 2018 Apr 16;: Authors: Vitorino LM, Lopes-Júnior LC, de Oliveira GH, Tenaglia M, Brunheroto A, Cortez PJO, Lucchetti G Abstract OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown that spiritual/religious beliefs are associated with mental health and quality of life. However, so far, no study assessed the relationship between spiritual/religious coping (SRC) and depressive symptoms in family caregivers (FCs) of pediatric cancer patients, particularly in Latin America. This study aimed to investigate whether Positive and Negative SRC strategies are associated with depressive symptoms in FCs of pediatric cancer patients in Brazil. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study comprising 77 FCs of pediatric cancer patients from one Brazilian Pediatric Oncology Institute. SRC was assessed using the Brief SRC scale and depressive symptoms were evaluated by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Multiple regression models were performed to identify factors associated with SRC of FCs and their depressive symptoms. RESULTS: In the unadjusted linear regression models, depressive symptoms were positively associated with Negative SRC (B = 0.401; P < .001; Adjusted R2 = 16.1%) but not with Positive SRC (B = 0.111; P = .334). After adjusting for socio-demographics, religious practice/faith and health, Negative SRC remained associated with depressive symptoms (B = 3.56, P = .01, Adjusted R2 = 37.8%). In the logistic regression models, depressive symptoms were positively associated with Negative SRC (OR=3.68, CI95%: 1.46-9.25; P = .006), but not with Positive SRC (OR=1.49, CI95% : .69-3.22; P = .309). After adjustements, Negative SRC remained significant (OR=4.01, CI95% : 1.21-13.33; P =.023). CONCLUSIONS: Negative SRC was associated with depressive symptoms in family caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. Health professionals must be aware of the use of Negative SRC strategies in oncology care. PMID: 29663569 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]